ADLT 402. How Adults Learn. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Overview of the adult as a learner. Topics include how and what adults learn, why adults participate in learning and major barriers to learning for adults. Implications for teachers/trainers of adults are explored.

ADLT 600. Adult Education Perspective. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides a basic perspective on adult education. Presents a survey of the philosophical underpinnings of the field, including schools of thought and associated theorists, roles and functions of adult educators, agencies and organizations that sponsor adult education programs. Examines selected processes and procedures used by adult educators and current issues impacting adult education.

ADLT 601. Adult Learning and Development. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An examination of the research findings from the applied behavioral sciences that affect adult learning throughout the lifespan, including psychological, social and physical attributes of adults as learners. Explores the philosophical and theoretical foundations of the field, including schools of thought and associated theorists. Emphasis on the effects of age on learning, the importance of self-image and factors affecting adult motivation for learning. Addresses different learning styles, application of adult learning theories to practice and the relationship of adult learning to adult development.

ADLT 606. Design and Delivery of Adult Learning Programs. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides a comprehensive understanding of the design, development and delivery process necessary to create a program, course or workshop for adult learners. Emphasis is on actual design of an adult learning experience from initial stages of needs assessment to concluding evaluation and assessment of effectiveness, including development of instructional strategies and methods for delivery.

ADLT 607. Writing Instruction for Adult Learners. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Designed for individuals interested in teaching adult literacy learners. Course participants will study and practice methods for the teaching of writing. This course is designed to provide an overview of the practices, research and application of instructional techniques for effectively working with adult learners in the writing classroom. Participants will be introduced to these techniques through readings from various websites, online documents and a required textbook.

ADLT 608. Adult Education Practicum. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Designed for individuals interested in teaching adult literacy learners. This 120-hour field-based capstone experience for adult education students is an integral component of the professional preparation of adult education educators. The practicum must be supervised jointly by the adult education adviser at VCU's School of Education and the field supervisor in the adult education program in which the experience is being conducted.

ADLT 610. Consulting Skills In Adult Learning Environments. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An introduction to the consultation skills necessary to effect change when the educator is in a position of influence, rather than direct control or management responsibility. Presents historical and theoretical models of change, facilitation skills necessary for introducing and sustaining change, strategies for dealing with resistance, and ethical issues involved in consultation. Students gain practical experience by conducting an intervention as the major project assignment in the course.

ADLT 612. Learning in Groups and Teams. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Explores fundamentals of learning in groups and teams, including effects of leadership, group member roles and processes, performance, development, goals, and culture. Examines group theory, models and practices of collective learning. Addresses the situated nature of learning, effects of social context and the concepts inherent in sustaining communities of practice.

ADLT 614. Curriculum Development for Adult Educators. 3 Hours.

Semester course delivered online; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Those wishing to apply this course to the five-course endorsement in adult literacy must be licensed to teach in Virginia, however a teaching license is not a prerequisite of the course. Designed to provide an overview of research and practice related to effective curriculum design. The course introduces models of program planning, curriculum development and evaluation appropriate for a variety of adult learners, including those requiring accommodations for disability, literacy, non-native English-speaking ability and multicultural backgrounds.

ADLT 620. Human Resource Development Overview. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides an overview of the HRD field to include theories, practices and emerging concepts. Emphasis is on roles, functions and responsibilities of the HRD practitioner in supporting the strategies, mission and goals of the enterprise, whether public, private or nonprofit.

ADLT 621. Skills Development for Human Resource Development. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Develops skills and understandings critical to success as an HRD practitioner. Exposes students to techniques of instruction and survey instruments to gauge organizational climate and learning style differences. Emphasizes practical experience and issue analysis in gaining HRD skills that can be immediately employed.

ADLT 622. Human Resource Development Strategies and Interventions. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines organizational development, nature of interventions, when to use them (and not use them), and a variety of models for aligning human resources capabilities with organizational needs. Focuses on introduction of change and transformation of organizational culture.

ADLT 623. Organizational Learning. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines the theoretical basis for organizational learning and the practices inherent in developing a learning organization. Examines organizational culture and socialization; systems thinking; organizations as interpretative systems; the leader's role in creating, sustaining and changing culture; strategies for enhancing collective learning; distributed cognition; and strategies for knowledge management.

ADLT 625. Change Strategies for HRD Practitioners. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Develops skills in change intervention strategies by employing the theoretical frameworks of organization development and organization transformation to address critical organizational issues and problems. Explores the HRD practitioner's role in facilitating organizational change through action research, action science, action learning and large-scale, whole-system interventions. Examines the differing roles and ethical issues for improving organizational effectiveness with special attention to organizational culture and a systems perspective of change.

ADLT 632. The Changing Face of Higher Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines how higher education is changing and explores the reasons for these changes; studies how the academy is responding to social pressures and explores scenarios for future change. Crosslisted as: EDUS 632.

ADLT 636. Capstone Seminar in Action Learning. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Restricted to students who have completed all other foundation and core courses or are taking this course in conjunction with the final specialty track courses in the M.Ed. in Adult Learning program; permission of adviser required. An integrative end-of-program course that utilizes skills and knowledge gained in all earlier courses, including philosophical and theoretical assumptions of adult learning and strategies for creating effective individual and collective learning environments. Students consult with a community-based, educational, nonprofit or for-profit organization using action learning methods of inquiry to solve a real organizational problem. Requires synthesis of knowledge and expertise in all aspects of adult learning and demonstrated proficiency in research and evaluation skills appropriate for the master's degree level. An end-of-semester presentation and consulting report are provided to the organization's leaders.

ADLT 640. Theory and Practice of eLearning Integration Into Adult Learning Environments. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides learners with a theoretical foundation and rationale for the successful integration of eLearning into formal and informal adult learning environments. This course begins with an overview of educational theory and social constructivist teaching philosophy before addressing the fundamental issues that instructional designers should consider when designing, delivering and assessing eLearning in adult learning environments. Note: This is a hybrid course.

ADLT 641. Exploration of Digital Media for Adult Learning. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Designed to engage students in an exploration of digital media to enhance adult learning. Through hands-on experience with tools, examination of emerging media formats and the evaluation of course learning products, students will learn to create, critique and explore a variety of digital media to support learning in a variety of instructional contexts. Special emphasis will be placed on using digital technology tools to support communication, knowledge building and learning in both formal and informal adult learning settings.

ADLT 642. Design Challenges in Creating eLearning for Adults. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides learners who have developed a deep understanding of the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of instructional design in eLearning environments through ADLT 640 and who have developed fluency in developing content using new freely available digital media tools in ADLT 641 with an opportunity to undertake a major project in eLearning design. Note: This is a hybrid course.

ADLT 650. Adult Literacy and Diversity. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Surveys the field of adult literacy and its many purposes, definitions, contexts and ideologies by exploring relationships between literacy and learning in numerous contexts, from corporate HRD programs to refugee communities. By applying analytical tools of critical theorists to raise awareness of the ideological nature of adult learning, and by examining contexts and foundations of adult literacy, the course takes up epistemological, ethical and instructional issues that relate to all aspects of adult learning.

ADLT 670. Curriculum Design in Medical Education. 2 Hours.

Hybrid course; 2 credits Restricted to faculty in the School of Medicine. Introduces adult learning principles and practices for the design and assessment of courses, units and individual lessons within a medical education curriculum in both preclinical and clinical settings.

ADLT 671. Theory and Practice of Adult Learning for Medical Educators. 2 Hours.

Hybrid course; 2 credits. Restricted to faculty in the School of Medicine. Provides an overview of the major adult learning theories that are applicable to medical education and explores how these form the basis for teaching and learning in medicine. Examines behavioral, cognitive, social, experiential and transformative learning orientations for relevance in medical education. Emphasis is on how knowledge is constructed and organized in the development of expertise.

ADLT 672. Instructional Strategies for Teaching in Medicine. 2 Hours.

Hybrid course; 2 credits. Restricted to faculty in the School of Medicine. Designed to provide medical educators with knowledge and skills practice in teaching effectively in large and small groups using discussion-based strategies, team-based learning, process-oriented guided inquiry learning and problem-based learning, as well as other active learning methods. Learners design and implement a small-group learning strategy appropriate for a medical education setting.

ADLT 673. Teaching as Scholarship in Medical Education. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 30 contact hours. 2 credits. Restricted to faculty in the School of Medicine. Orients the medical educator to basic design principles for conducting research that contributes to the scholarship of teaching and learning in medical education using qualitative, quantitative or mixed methods. Examines basic research paradigms, problem identification, question development, selection of methodology, IRB preparation and requirements for journal submission and publication.

ADLT 674. Performance Feedback and Simulation in the Medical Education Curriculum. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 30 contact hours. 2 credits. Restricted to faculty in the School of Medicine. Introduces medical educators to the use of simulated learning experiences in preparing health care professionals for patient care. The emphasis is on acquiring skills to develop and lead simulation exercises and on developing facilitation skills needed to provide effective feedback to debrief the activity. Requires hands-on observation and participation in simulation at the VCU Center for Human Simulation and Safety.

ADLT 675. Group and Team Facilitation for Medical Educators. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 30 contact hours. 2 credits. Restricted to faculty in the School of Medicine. An introduction to the nature of learning in groups and teams. The course explores basic issues fundamental to all groups such as leadership, goals, group member roles, stages of group and team development, issues in team performance and an understanding of how institutional culture shapes group behavior.

ADLT 676. Digital Media Technologies for Teaching in Medicine. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 30 contact hours. 2 credits. Restricted to faculty in the School of Medicine. Introduces digital media technologies to bring state-of-the art teaching and learning strategies into the medical education curriculum. Explores Web 2.0 tools including wikis, blogs, podcasts and other emerging media, as well as the evaluation of digital media technologies to support learning in the preclinical or clinical curriculum. Emphasis is on building student engagement and community through participatory strategies for learning.

ADLT 677. Reflective Practice in Medical Education. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 30 contact hours. 2 credits. Restricted to faculty in the School of Medicine. Introduces the concept of reflective practice for medical educators, including the educator's role in developing trainees as reflective practitioners and the role of reflection in one's own professional development. Includes the concept of narrative medicine as a reflective practice that enables a more holistic understanding of patients and their illnesses, with application for the education of medical professionals.

ADLT 688. Lifespan Issues for Adults with Learning and Behavioral Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Explores the literature, research, issues and best practices for the population of individuals with learning disabilities and behavior disorders (including ADHD) beyond the school-age years. Focus on disabilities as they are manifested in a variety of settings and contexts in which adults with learning and behavior disorders function. These include areas such as employment, post-secondary education, community, family and leisure. In addition, social-emotional functioning and daily living challenges will be interspersed in the course material. Course goal is to develop understanding and the skill of critical reflection about persons with learning disabilities and behavior disorders in their adult years.

ADLT 702. Seminal Readings in Adult Learning Literature. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A seminal readings course to explore some of the prominent classics in adult learning literature. Designed for doctoral students in adult learning and other disciplines in which knowledge and understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of adult education is desirable as a foundation for effective pedagogy/andragogy. While prior participation in a master's-level adult learning theories class may be beneficial, it is not a prerequisite.