EGRE   101. Introduction to Engineering. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Course open to first-year students majoring in electrical or computer engineering. Introduction to engineering through instruction on basic concepts of engineering. Topics will include an introduction to basic circuit components and circuit analysis, digital logic design and programming. General topics important to all engineers will also be covered, such as mathematics, improving written and oral communication skills, teamwork, ethics and life-long learning. The laboratory introduces fundamental testing, measurement, troubleshooting methodology and proper laboratory notebook maintenance. Engineering design and analysis is also emphasized through a team-based design that involves designing, building and programming a robot.

EGRE   206. Electric Circuits. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: MATH   200 and EGRE   101, EGRM 101 or EGRB   102, as applicable per department, both with minimum grades of C. Corequisite: MATH   201. An introduction to electrical circuit theory and its application to practical direct and alternating current circuits. Topics include: Kirchhoff's Laws (review from EGRE   101, EGRM 101 or EGRB   102, as applicable), fundamental principles of network theorems, transient and steady-state response of RC, RL and RLC circuits by classical methods, time-domain and frequency-domain relationships, phasor analysis and power. Laboratory work, practical applications and integral laboratory demonstrations emphasize and illustrate the fundamentals presented in this course.

EGRE   207. Electric Circuits II. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   206, with a minimum grade of C. An introduction to higher level electric circuit theory, including the study of basic active components, such as diodes and operational amplifiers. Emphasis will be placed on design rather than analysis. The laboratory exercises will serve to train students in the art of designing a circuit to perform specific tasks and to conform to specific design parameters.

EGRE   224. Introduction to Microelectronics. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisites: EGRE   207 and MATH   301, both with a minimum grade of C. This course covers the analysis, modeling and design of electrical circuits which contain electronic devices. Students will learn to design analog circuits to specifications through laboratory problems, a design project and circuit simulation.

EGRE   245. Engineering Programming Using C. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Restricted to electrical and computer engineering majors. Prerequisite: MATH   151 with a minimum grade of C. Students are expected to have fundamental computer skills. Introduction to the concepts and practice of structured programming using C. Problem-solving, top-down design of algorithms, basic C syntax, control structures, functions, arrays, files and strings.

EGRE   246. Advanced Engineering Programming Using C++. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to electrical and computer engineering majors. Prerequisite: EGRE   245 with a minimum grade of C. Advanced programming for engineering applications in C++. Topics include objects, classes and inheritance; linked lists; recursion; basic searching and sorting techniques; and program design for control and monitoring type applications.

EGRE   254. Digital Logic Design. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisites: EGRE   101 and EGRE   245 or equivalents, both with a minimum grade of C. An introduction to digital logic design with an emphasis on practical design techniques and circuit implementations. Topics include number representation in digital computers, Boolean algebra, theory of logic functions, mapping techniques and function minimization, design of combinational, clocked sequential and interactive digital circuits such as comparators, counters, pattern detectors, adders and subtractors. An introduction on designing digital circuits using schematic capture, logic simulation and hardware description languages is included. Students will use the above basic skills in the laboratory to design and fabricate digital logic circuits using discrete logic and field programmable gate arrays.

EGRE   303. Electronic Devices. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: EGRE   306 and MATH   301, both with a minimum grade of C. An introduction to solid state electronic devices covering the fundamentals of atomic structure, band theory, charge transport in solids and terminal electrical characteristics of semiconductor devices including p-n junction and Schottky diodes, bipolar junction and insulated gate field-effect transistors.

EGRE   306. Introduction to Microelectronics.. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisites: EGRE   207 and MATH   301, both with a minimum grade of C. This course covers the analysis, modeling and design of electrical circuits which contain electronic devices. Students will learn to design analog circuits to specifications through laboratory problems, a design project and circuit simulation.

EGRE   307. Integrated Circuits. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   306 with a minimum grade of C or consent of instructor. Analysis, modeling, design and measurement of advanced MOSFET and bipolar analog integrated circuits. Topics include active filters, differential amplifiers, frequency response and feedback topologies. Operational amplifier circuit topologies are used as a means of studying input, gain, level shift and output stages. Circuit design techniques are explored for mixed signal analog-digital circuits. This course provides the opportunity for a group design project of an integrated circuit chip, using advanced software tools for simulation and physical layout.

EGRE   309. Electromagnetic Fields. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: EGRE   207, MATH   301, MATH   307 and PHYS   208, all with a minimum grade of C. Fundamentals of engineering electromagnetics, including electrostatics, magnetostatics, electrodynamics, analysis and understanding of the phenomena associated with electric and magnetic fields, wave dynamical solutions of Maxwell's equations, reflection and transmission of electromagnetic waves in dielectric materials, waveguides and transmission line structures, and radiation from antennas.

EGRE   310. Microwave and Photonic Engineering. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   309 with a minimum grade of C. Wireless and optical communications applications of electromagnetic fields. Theory of microwave transmission line and waveguiding structures including impedance transformation and matching. Essential concepts from geometrical and physical optics and the interaction of photons with materials will be studied. Operating principles and design considerations of fiber optics, photodetectors and receivers are considered.

EGRE   334. Introduction to Microfabrication. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisites: CHEM   101, MATH   201 and PHYS   208, all with a minimum grade of C. This course gives an overview of microscale device fabrication and testing for a general audience. A wide variety of new terms, equipment and processes are presented. Fundamentals of photolithography, mask making, diffusion, oxidation, ion implantation, film deposition and etching are covered. Laboratory work consists of safety training, hands-on fabrication experience and testing. A laboratory chip test is fabricated from start to finish and then tested. The test chip includes basic integrated circuit elements as well as solar cells.

EGRE   335. Signals and Systems I. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisites: EGRE   206 and 245 and MATH   301, all with a minimum grade of C. Presents the concept of linear continuous-time and discrete-time signals and systems, their classification, and analysis and design using mathematical models. Topics to be covered: the concepts of linear systems and classification of these systems, continuous-time linear systems and differential and difference equations, convolution, frequency domain analysis of systems, Fourier series and Fourier transforms and their application, and continuous-time to discrete-time conversion.

EGRE   336. Introduction to Communication Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   337 with a minimum grade of C. Introduction to the theory and application of analog and digital communications including signal analysis, baseband transmission, amplitude and angle modulation, digital modulation, baseband digital communication, and design considerations.

EGRE   337. Signals and Systems II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   335 with a minimum grade of C. This class presents the Laplace and Z transforms and their application to electrical circuits and discrete-time systems, an introduction to probability, random variables and random processes with applications in electrical engineering.

EGRE   364. Microcomputer Systems. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisites: EGRE   246 and 254, both with a minimum grade of C. Basic computer organization, microprocessor instruction sets and architectures, assembly language programming and the function of computer memory and I/O subsystems will be discussed. The laboratory is designed to reinforce the lectures by providing the opportunity to study the workings of a simple computer system in detail using simulation models and real hardware. Students will write and execute assembly language programs and make use of commercial design automation tools.

EGRE   365. Digital Systems. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisites: EGRE   246 and 254, both with a minimum grade of C. Corequisite: EGRE   364. Focuses on the design of modern digital systems. Topics covered include: introduction to modeling, simulation, synthesis and FPGA design techniques using VHDL; microprocessor peripherals and interfacing; embedded system hardware and software design issues.

EGRE   397. Vertically Integrated Projects in Electrical and Computer Engineering. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 3 laboratory hours. 1 credit. May be repeated for a maximum of 2 credits. Requires permission of the project faculty adviser. Restricted to electrical engineering and computer engineering majors. This course provides undergraduate students the opportunity to participate in multiyear, multidisciplinary projects under the guidance of faculty and graduate students in their areas of expertise. As they address research and development issues, students learn and practice many different professional skills, make substantial technical contributions to the project, and experience many different roles on a large, multidisciplinary design/discovery team.

EGRE   402. Senior Design Studio I (Laboratory/Project Time). 2 Hours.

Semester course; 6 laboratory hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: senior standing in electrical engineering, participation in a senior design (capstone) project, EGRE   207, 246, 254, 335, and completion of any of EGRE   307, 310, 334, 365, 426, 435, 444, 454, 455, 520, 521, 522, 525, 526, 531, 533, 535, all with a minimum grade of C. Co-requisite: any 400-level electrical engineering technical elective. A minimum of six laboratory hours per week dedicated to the execution phase of the senior design (capstone) project, which should meet appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints. Tasks include team meetings, brainstorming, sponsor advising, designing, fabrications, assembling, reviewing, studying, researching, testing and validating projects.

EGRE   403. Senior Design Studio II (Laboratory/Project Time). 2 Hours.

Semester course; 6 laboratory hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   402 with a minimum grade of C. A minimum of six laboratory hours per week dedicated to the execution phase of the senior design (capstone) project, which should meet appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints. Tasks include team meetings, brainstorming, sponsor advising, designing, fabrications, assembling, reviewing, studying, researching, testing and validating projects.

EGRE   426. Computer Organization and Design. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 1 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   364 or CMSC   311 with a minimum grade of C. This course presents the foundation for computer design at the register transfer level. Starting from an instruction set architecture, students will learn the process used to design a data path and control unit to implement that instruction set. In addition, the topics of computer components and structures, data paths and control unit organizations, I/O and memory systems, interrupt systems, pipelining, and multiprocessing will be discussed. In addition to reinforcing the lecture material, the laboratory exercises will teach students the art of modeling and designing computer system components using a hardware description language.

EGRE   427. Advanced Digital Design. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   365 and 426, both with a minimum grade of C. This course provides students with practical foundations for the design, implementation and testing of digital systems. It expands on the digital and computer system theory presented in prerequisite courses. Topics covered include: microcontrollers and embedded processors, application specific IC (ASIC) architectures and implementing digital systems with ACISs, logic families and high-speed interfacing, logic synthesis, design methodologies, hardware/software codesign, production testing and design for testability, and construction, testing and debugging of digital system prototypes. In the laboratory, the students will design, construct, test and debug a multidisciplinary, computer-based hardware/software system to meet appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints.

EGRE   428. Introduction to Integrated Systems Design. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Prerequisite: EGRE   364 with a minimum grade of C. This course provides an introduction to senior capstone design for computer engineers. Topics include hardware/software project design methodologies, integrated hardware and software design tools, life cycle costs analysis and requirements and specification analysis. Students are also introduced to concepts and design tools for FPGA and system-on-a-chip devices. Lectures are intended to support tasks required to execute a successful senior capstone experience. These tasks include, but are not limited to, project configuration management, customer interaction skills, requirements elicitation, simulation, procurement, design, testing and validation.

EGRE   429. Advanced Digital Systems Design. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: EGRE   365 and EGRE   428, both with a minimum grade of C. This course provides students with theoretical and practical foundations for advanced embedded systems design and cyber physical system applications. It extends the concepts introduced in EGRE 418. Special emphasis is placed on the design of advanced embedded computing platforms for cyber physical system applications. Topics covered include: introduction to cyber physical systems; cyber physical systems theory; FPGA and system-on-a-chip design environments; designing, developing and implementing cyber physical systems using FPGA and system-on-a-chip technology; real-time computing and operating systems; real-time sensor networks; engineering design standards; and verification and validation of complex designs. In the laboratory the students will use state-of-the-art system development tools to design, construct, test and verify a system-on-a-chip-based system to meet appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic system constraints.

EGRE   435. Microscale and Nanoscale Fabrication. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisites: EGRE   303 and EGRE   334, both with a minimum grade of C. This course presents the design tools and techniques for designing a fabrication process as well as a device design and layout for advanced microscale and nanoscale devices. A number of different types of device technologies are covered, incorporating electronic, micromechanical and microfluidic devices and sensors. In the laboratory section of the course, students work in design teams to develop a complete fabrication process and design layout for a microscale device to meet appropriate engineering standards and multiple realistic constraints. Computer simulations and computer-aided design tools are used in the final design. The laboratory section of this course accomplishes the design phase of the senior design capstone project, which is presented at the end of semester and fabricated in the subsequent course, EGRE   436.

EGRE   436. Advanced Microscale and Nanoscale Fabrication. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   435 with a minimum grade of C. This course presents a detailed analysis of the physics and modeling of the fundamental processes used in semiconductor processing. Emphasis is placed on the non-ideal effects that cause realistic processes to deviate from first order models, including second order effects such as interactions on the atomic level and the influence of crystal defects. Processes covered in detail include oxidation, diffusion, ion implementation, thin film deposition and plasma etching techniques. Student work in design teams in the laboratory section, which focuses on the fabrication and testing of the microscale device developed in EGRE   435. The laboratory section of the course accomplishes the fabrication and testing phase of the senior design capstone project.

EGRE   444. Communication Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   336 with a minimum grade of C. Design and analysis of analog and digital communication systems, pulse modulation, information and digital transmission, digital modulation, information theory and coding will be treated. Emphasis is placed on the student gaining an appreciation for and an understanding of the role of optimization and trade-offs by considering bandwidth requirements, signal-to-noise ratio limitations, complexity and cost of analog and digital communication systems.

EGRE   454. Automatic Controls. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   337, EGMN   305 or EGMN   315 with a minimum grade of C. For computer engineering or electrical engineering majors, the prerequisite is EGRE   337 with a minimum grade of C.This course covers the design and analysis of linear feedback systems. Emphasis is placed upon the student gaining mathematical modeling experience and performing sensitivity and stability analysis. The use of compensators to meet systems design specifications will be treated. Topics include: an overview and brief history of feedback control, dynamic models, dynamic response, basic properties of feedback, root-locus, frequency response and state space design methods. The laboratory will consist of modeling and control demonstrations and experiments of single-input/single-output and multivariable systems, analysis and simulation using MATLAB/Simulink and other control system analysis/design/implementation software.

EGRE   455. Control Systems Design. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   454 with a minimum grade of C. This course covers the use of state space methods to model analog and digital linear and nonlinear systems. Emphasis is placed on the student gaining mathematical modeling experience, performing sensitivity and stability analysis and designing compensators to meet systems specifications. Topics treated will include a review of root locus and frequency design methods, linear algebraic equations, state variable equations, state space design and digital control systems (principles and case studies). The students will use complex dynamic systems for analysis and design.

EGRE   471. Power System Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   206 with a minimum grade of C. Provides a comprehensive overview of electrical power system operation and design. Students develop models and tools for investigating system behavior and have opportunities for using those tools in design processes. At the completion of the course students will be able to develop appropriate models for an interconnected power system, perform power flow analysis, economic dispatch, power system protection and controls. Students will also be able to write a basic power flow computer program.

EGRE   491. Special Topics. 1-5 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-5 credits. May be repeated with different topics for a total of 21 credits. Advanced study of a selected topic in electrical or computer engineering. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester and prerequisites.

EGRE   492. Independent Study in Electrical and Computer Engineering. 1-5 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-5 credits. May be repeated with different content for a total of 9 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Students must submit a written proposal to be approved by the supervising instructor prior to registration. Investigation of specialized electrical or computer engineering problems through literature search, mathematical analysis, computer simulation and/or laboratory experimentation. Written and oral progress reports as well as a final report and presentation are required.

EGRE   497. Vertically Integrated Project in Electrical and Computer Engineering. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 6 laboratory hours. 2 credits. May be repeated for a maximum total of 6 credits. Prerequisites: EGRE   397 and permission of the project faculty adviser. Restricted to electrical engineering and computer engineering majors. This course allows undergraduate students to continue to participate in multiyear, multidisciplinary projects under the guidance of faculty and graduate students in their areas of expertise. As they address research and development issues, students learn and practice many different professional skills, make substantial technical contributions to the project, and experience many different roles on a large, multidisciplinary design/discovery team.

EGRE   521. Advanced Semiconductor Devices. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: EGRE   303, PHYS   420 and 440, or equivalents or permission of instructor. Studies the fundamentals of semiconductor heterojunctions, metal-semiconductor contacts, metal-oxide-semiconductor structures, defects, interface states, scaled MOS transistors and heterojunction bipolar transistors.

EGRE   525. Fundamentals of Photonics Engineering. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: EGRE   303, 309 and 310 or equivalents. An introduction to the interaction of electromagnetic lightwaves with solid-state materials. Based on the quantum mechanics of photon emission and absorption, the generation and detection of coherent light by semiconductor lasers and photodetectors are investigated. Optical waveguides also are studies for use in sensors employing interferometric and evanescent-field principles. Examples of integrated photonic sensors are presented for mechanical, chemical and biological systems.

EGRE   526. Computer Networks and Communications. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CMSC   312. Theoretical and applied analysis of basic data communication systems; design of networks in the framework of the OSI reference model; Local and Wide Area Networks; performance analysis of networks; error control and security. Students will work in teams to design and implement a small computer network. Crosslisted as: CMSC   506.

EGRE   531. Multicore and Multithreaded Programming. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   364 or CMSC   311 or permission of instructor. Introducing multicore architectures, multithreaded programming models, OpenMP, Pthreads, thread synchronization, performance evaluation and optimization, load balancing and software tools for multicore/multithread programming.

EGRE   533. VLSI Design. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisites: EGRE   224 and EGRE   364. Analysis of NMOS and PMOS transistor design and their use in implementing digital logic. Implementation and layout of simple and complex digital logic cells using CMOS and other techniques. Fabrication design rules and design technology. VLSI chip layout and implementation. Students will design a complete VLSI chip using commercial design tools. The resulting designs will be submitted for fabrication using the MOSIS process.

EGRE   535. Digital Signal Processing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: EGRE   337 or consent of instructor. The course focuses on digital signal processing theory and algorithms, including sampling theorems, transform analysis and filter design techniques. Discrete-time signals and systems, and filter design techniques are treated. Several applications of DSP in telecommunications, image and video processing, and speech and audio processing are studied.

EGRE   540. Electromagnetics and Passive RF Components. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   309 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Basics of electromagnetics and passive RF components such as filters, isolators, tuners, phase shifters, resonators and tees are discussed, along with a succinct description of media such as ferrites and tunable ferrites.

EGRE   553. Industrial Control Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: senior or graduate student standing in the School of Engineering, EGRE   246 and EGRE   254, or permission of the instructor. This course provides an introduction to the systems, techniques and languages used in the control of manufacturing and process industries. Major topics include programmable logic controller operation and programming, supervisory control and data acquisition systems, and human machine interfaces. Other topics include an introduction to feedback control systems, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog conversion, sensors and transducers, and actuators and motors.

EGRE   555. Dynamics and Multivariable Control I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH   301 and 310 or the equivalent. Systems of differential equations with controls, linear control systems, controllability, observability, introduction to feedback control and stabilization. Crosslisted as: MATH   555.

EGRE   572. Electric Machines. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: EGRE   206 and EGRE   309. Presents the principles of electric machines, including transformers, AC machinery fundamentals, modeling and simulation of AC machines, synchronous machines, induction machines, DC motors and generators, and special-purpose motors.

EGRE   591. Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-4 credits. Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing in the School of Engineering or permission of the instructor. Lectures, tutorial studies, library assignments in selected areas of advanced study or specialized laboratory procedures not available in other courses or as part of research training.

EGRE   620. Electron Theory of Solids. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHYS   420 and 440 or permission of instructor. The study of electronic structures, band structure calculations, optical absorption and emission, lasing in semiconductors, electron-photon interactions, heterostructures and nanostructures. Quantum theory of electron-photon interaction, absorption and emission, semiconductor lasers, linear response transport, Landauer Buttiker formulas, mesoscopic devices and phenomena, resonant tunneling, single electronics, non-equilibrium Green's function formalism, second quantization, coupled mode theory, electrons in a magnetic field, and integer quantum Hall effect.

EGRE   621. Spintronics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   620 or equivalent, or with permission of instructor. Basic concept of spin, spin interactions, spin transport, spin-based classical devices, single spintronics and spin-based quantum computing.

EGRE   622. MEMS Design and Fabrication. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: EGRE   303 and EGRE   334 or permission of instructor. The course provides the background required to conduct research in microelectromechanical systems. The course provides an overview as well as detailed coverage of material properties, specialized fabrication techniques and the fundamental principles of the major classes of MEMS devices. This will include mechanical sensors and actuators, surface acoustic wave devices, optical sensors, modulators and switches, bioMEMS, chemical and biochemical sensors, and microfluidic devices.

EGRE   623. Nanostructures and Nanodevices. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: EGRE   303, PHYS   420 and 440, equivalents or permission of instructor. Devoted to the fundamentals and technology of semiconductor nanostructures and relevant devices. Engineering and physics of new solid state devices, confined structures in one, two and three dimensions and their effect on more traditional solid state devices are covered.

EGRE   625. Clean Room Lab Practicum. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 3 laboratory hours. 1 credit. Prerequisite: EGRE   334 or permission of instructor. The course develops the detailed knowledge and skills required to design and fabricate advanced microscale and nanoscale devices for doctoral thesis work in a micro- and nano-fabrication facility cleanrooms. The course focuses on fabricating a nanostructured device and involves photolithography, wet and dry etching, oxidations, diffusions and thin film depositions. Students will complete the processing of the device and perform characterization experiments. Design skills will also be developed, including design and layout using software tools and fabrication of custom photomasks. Students will document all aspects of the laboratory work.

EGRE   630. Neural Networks. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Introduces students to the fundamental theory, design and applications of neural networks. Topics covered will include network architectures, the learning process, types of learning, single layer perceptrons, multilayer perceptrons and neural network applications.

EGRE   631. Real-time and Embedded Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   426 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Presents advanced material in the area of the design, implementation and testing of embedded computer systems intended to operate as part of a larger system. Topics to be discussed include design challenges of embedded computing, real-time scheduling theory, worst-case execution time analysis, embedded architectures, embedded software design and performance optimizations. Hands-on labs and a research project on advanced topics in this field will be included in this course.

EGRE   633. Advanced VLSI Systems Design. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   533. Design techniques, implementation technologies and device design for high speed, large scale and low power integrated circuits. Topics presented include: submicron technologies, devices and architectures for low power VLSI, high speed clocking issues, BiCMOS devices and circuits, I/O circuit design, design for testing, analog VLSI, VLSI design methodologies, and physical design and VLSI algorithms. The course will include a design project for a complex VLSI device which will be performed using commercial design tools.

EGRE   634. Advanced Digital Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   254 or equivalent. Addresses topics and techniques in advanced switching theory that are relevant to the design of modern digital systems. Topics covered include: mathematical foundations, logic functions and their representations, optimization, verification, synthesis, synchronous and asynchronous finite state machines, modular designs, and fault detection.

EGRE   635. Advanced Computer Architecture. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   426 or with permission of instructor. This course will focus on the design and analysis of high performance computer architectures. Topics investigated include: pipeline design, superscalar computers, multiprocessors, memory systems, peripherals, interfacing techniques, networks, performance and software issues. Crosslisted as: CMSC   605.

EGRE   640. Semiconductor Optoelectronics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   309 or equivalent or permission of instructor. Discussions of optical processes in semiconductors and semiconductor heterostructures in terms of radiative and nonradiative processes, as well as absorption. Also covers in depth the theory and practice of light-emitting diodes, including those intended for solid-state lighting, lasers and detectors.

EGRE   655. Dynamics and Multivariable Control II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MATH   555 and MATH   507 recommended, or permission of instructor. Control problems for nonlinear systems of ordinary differential equations, methods of feedback control to achieve control objectives. Crosslisted as: MATH   655.

EGRE   656. Estimation and Optimal Filtering. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MATH   310, EGRE   337 and EGRE   555/MATH   555. This course will expose students to the fundamental issues in parameter estimation and recursive state estimation for dynamic systems. Topics covered will include maximum likelihood estimation, maximum a posteriori estimation, least squares estimation, minimum mean square error estimation, Cramer-Rao lower bound, discrete-time Kalman filter for linear dynamic systems, extended Kalman filter for nonlinear problems and system models for the Kalman filter.

EGRE   671. Power System Operations and Controls. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EGRE   471 or equivalent. This course covers the fundamental concepts of economic operation and controls of power systems, including real and reactive power balance, optimized generation dispatch, steady state and dynamic analysis, real-time monitoring and controls, and contingency analysis. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to develop equivalent circuits and compute programs for power flow analysis, define and analyze automatic generation control scheme on a power system, develop generation dispatching schemes, define and analyze state estimation of a power system using analysis programs, and perform contingency studies of the grid.

EGRE   691. Special Topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Prerequisites: at least one graduate-level engineering course and permission of instructor. An advanced study of selected topic(s) in electrical and computer engineering. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

EGRE   692. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture and 1-3 laboratory hours. 1-3 credits. Prerequisites: graduate standing and permission of instructor. The student must identify an electrical and computer engineering faculty member willing to supervise the course and submit a proposal for approval to the electrical and computer engineering graduate committee. Investigation of specialized electrical and computer engineering problems through literature search, mathematical analysis, computer simulations and/or experimentation. Written and oral reports, final report and examination are required.

EGRE   697. Directed Research in Electrical and Computer Engineering. 1-15 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-15 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Research directed toward completion of the requirements for the electrical and computer engineering track in the M.S. or Ph.D. in Engineering performed under the direction of an electrical and computer engineering faculty member and advisory committee. Graded as S/U/F.