HCPR   601. Introduction to Health Policy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The course will familiarize students with the major players and issues in health care policy, using health reform in the U.S. as a framework through which to analyze the issues of cost, quality and access, and will focus on the roles of payers, providers and patients in the health care system. This course is interactive and uses studies from the scientific literature, class discussion and lectures from experts in the field. Students are required to write a paper evaluating the challenges regarding a public health policy topic in the U.S. and prepare a group presentation addressing questions related to key issues of the U.S. health care system.

HCPR   610. Foundations in Health Services Research Methods. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Will provide students with the opportunity to learn and apply basic data analysis skills and statistical methods common in health services research including programming, data cleaning and fundamental approaches in univariate, bivariate and multivariate analyses.

HCPR   691. Special Topics in Healthcare Policy and Research. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. The course may include discussion of research topics of emerging interest/importance and published papers of current interest; new findings in health services research, health economics and health policy; and the application of research methods and study design to current topics within the broad field of healthcare policy and health services research, focusing on interdisciplinary research and applied methods. Graded S/U/F.

HCPR   692. Special Topics in Healthcare Policy and Research. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. The course may include discussion of research topics of emerging interest/importance and published papers of current interest; new findings in health services research, health economics and health policy; and the application of research methods and study design to current topics within the broad field of healthcare policy and health services research, focusing on interdisciplinary research and applied methods.

HCPR   697. Independent Study in Healthcare Policy and Research. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Provides the opportunity for students to conduct research under the direction of a faculty member. A proposal for a course of study must be submitted to and approved by the chair of the Department of Healthcare Policy and Research. Credits will be assigned commensurate with the complexity of the project. Arrangements are made directly with the appropriate faculty member and department chair. Graded as S/U/F.

HCPR   699. Departmental Seminar. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Students will attend seminars presented by faculty and invited guests on topics and trends within health policy and health services research. Students and faculty will meet weekly to discuss the theoretical concepts and papers presented and other related topics. Graded as S/U/F.

HCPR   701. Health Services Research and Policy I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The first course of a two-semester sequence intended to familiarize students with the major players and issues in health care policy, using health reform in the U.S. as a framework through which to analyze the issues of cost, quality and access and to help students develop an independent research proposal. The focus is on the roles of payers, providers and patients in the health care system. This course will be interactive and use studies published in the scientific literature, policy briefs, government reports and textbooks about the health care system as teaching tools. Students will be required to write several short response papers addressing questions related to key issues under health reform as well as develop a research topic and conduct a literature review related to that topic.

HCPR   702. Health Services Research and Policy II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: HCPR   701. The second course of a two-semester sequence intended to familiarize students with the major players and issues in health care policy in the U.S. The course covers the issues of quality, cost, access, value, comparative effectiveness and cost effectiveness and addresses them in the context of conducting health care policy research.

HCPR   703. Health Economics: Theory and Principles. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A doctoral-level course in health economics with a focus on the theory and principles forming the basis of the field. Students will study foundational theory and research as well as recent applied studies contributing to the current knowledge in the field. Upon completing the course, students should have the theoretical grounding to allow them to frame applied research questions in health economics in terms of past theory and research as well as a sense of where further evidence is needed.

HCPR   720. Economics of Health Disparities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This doctoral-level survey course is designed to study the causes and consequences of population health disparities from an economic perspective. In addition to studying theories and current approaches from health, labor, public and stratification economics, students will also integrate perspectives from other disciplines, including sociology and psychology. Students will be expected to complete problem sets, in-class presentations and a research paper that will demonstrate the ability to use theoretically grounded approaches to the empirical study of health inequality. After completing this course, students should have an understanding of the economic approaches to health disparities and how to apply these approaches to empirical research.

HCPR   730. Survey Research Methods and Analysis for Health Policy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON   612 or equivalent or permission of instructor. This course is intended to familiarize students with the design and use of surveys for health services research and health policy; to understand the strengths and limitations of health surveys; and to compare and contrast health surveys with other data sources such as administrative records, claims data and electronic medical records. The course is designed to focus more on the applied use of health surveys for research and less on the theoretical aspects of survey and sample design. Class lectures and assignments are designed to guide students incrementally through the actual development and completion of a research project using publicly available survey data.

HCPR   732. Research Design and Proposal Preparation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Focuses on the design of experimental, quasi-experimental and nonexperimental studies in the healthcare field. Issues related to measurement will be stressed. Specific learning objectives include exploring the methodological issues in health services research; assessing scientific research and casual inference; evaluating a research problem and developing testable hypotheses; conducting data collection and assessing the sampling process; evaluating variable definition in terms of validity and reliability; assessing the various facets of experimental, quasi-experimental and observational designs; and preparing a healthcare research proposal.

HCPR   733. Statistical Methods in Analysis of Healthcare Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: BIOS   553; ECON   612; and one of BIOS   625, BIOS   631, BIOS 646 or ECON   642; or permission of instructor. Exposes students to large survey and administrative databases that are commonly used in health services research. Students will learn how to organize files, protect data and link databases from multiple sources by applying state-of-the-art deterministic and probabilistic linkage methods. Students will check the quality of merged datasets and learn the advanced techniques used in handling common problems such as missing data, selection bias and handling extreme outliers. Students will also apply the statistical methods that meet the qualities of these data in order to evaluate healthcare interventions and policies. This will be a hands-on course requiring students to download and manipulate data. While the primary emphasis is not on mathematical theory, a certain amount of theoretical background may be presented for some topics.

HCPR   734. Economic Evaluation and Decision Analysis in Health. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: an introductory course in probability and statistics. Introductory economics is recommended but not required. Introduces doctoral students to the methods, theory and growing range of applications of decision analysis for health care technology assessment, health policy analysis, medical decision-making and health resource allocation.

HCPR   899. Directed Research. 1-9 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 variable hours. 1-3 credits. Prerequisites: completion of required course work and comprehensive examination. Students are required to conduct and prepare a written dissertation under the guidance of a faculty committee. The dissertation is written in traditional academic style, consists of three papers and must be orally defended. Students must be continually enrolled in this course until the dissertation is successfully completed and approved. A minimum of nine dissertation credits must be taken. Graded S/U/F.