LING   103. Introduction to Languages. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A course designed to help students understand how languages function through a survey and contrastive analysis of language systems, with attention to the sociocultural, psychological and historical aspects of languages. Completion of this course does not qualify a student to take the 200 level of a language without passing a language placement test. Crosslisted as: LASK   103.

LING   390. Introduction to Linguistics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL   201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 211, 215, 236, 291 or 295. An introduction to methods of language analysis, emphasizing the study of sounds and sound patterns and units of meaning and their arrangements. Crosslisted as: ENGL   390/ANTH   390.

LING   392. Language, Culture and Cognition. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ANTH   220 or 230. Introduces theoretical and methodological foundations for the study of language from sociocultural perspectives. The perspectives include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of verbal and nonverbal communication as a social activity embedded in cultural contexts. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed. Crosslisted as: ANTH   328/ENGL   392/FRLG   328.

LING   401. Comparative Structures. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Course can be repeated with different topics up to a total of 6 credits. Prerequisites: SPAN   301; SPAN   305 or 307 or 311; SPAN   320 or 321 or 330 or 331. Conducted in Spanish. A comparison of English and Spanish, with emphasis on pronunciation and problems encountered in the teaching of Spanish. See the Schedule of Classes for the specific topic to be offered each semester. Crosslisted as: SPAN   401.

LING   402. Language Issues in the Spanish-speaking World. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Course can be repeated with different topics up to a total of 6 credits. Prerequisites: SPAN   301; SPAN   305 or 307 or 311; SPAN   320 or 321 or 330 or 331. Conducted in Spanish. Through a variety of topics this course explores the links between language and human behavior as exemplified by language phenomena in the Spanish-speaking world. Topics will be drawn mainly from sociolinguistics, language and culture, and education and applied linguistics. See the Schedule of Classes for the specific topic to be offered each semester. Crosslisted as: SPAN   402.

LING   450. Modern Grammar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL   201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 211, 215, 236, 291, or 295. Study of modern English grammar and usage with some attention to linguistic theory. Recommended for teachers at all levels. May not be used to satisfy the literature requirement of the College of Humanities and Sciences. For English majors, these courses (limit of six credits) may be counted as part of graduate or undergraduate degree, but not both. Crosslisted as: ENGL   450.

LING   451. History of the English Language. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL   201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 211, 215, 236, 291, or 295. The historical development of the English language; etymology, morphology, orthography and semantics. May not be used to satisfy the literature requirement of the College of Humanities and Sciences. For English majors, these courses (limit of six credits) may be counted as part of graduate or undergraduate degree, but not both. Crosslisted as: ENGL   451.

LING   452. Language and Gender. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL   201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 211,215, 236, 291 or 295. A study of relationships between gender and language by focusing on such issues as differences between the ways women and men use language, relationships between language and power and ways in which language reflects and reinforces cultural attitudes toward gender. May not be used to satisfy the literature requirement of the College of Humanities and Sciences. Crosslisted as: GSWS   452/ENGL   452.

LING   453. Modern Rhetoric. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: UNIV   200 or HONR   200, and ENGL   201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 211, 215, 236, 291, or 295. A study of a broad range of modern rhetorical theories, emphasizing their possible relationships with linguistics, literary criticism, civic engagement and the process of writing. Crosslisted as: ENGL   453.

LING   455. Language, Culture and Cognition. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: three credits in a 200-level literature course (or equivalent). Introduces theoretical and methodological foundations for the study of language from socio-cultural perspectives. The perspectives include linguistic, philosophical, psychological, sociological and anthropological contributions to the understanding of verbal and nonverbal communication as a social activity embedded in cultural contexts. No prior training in linguistics is presupposed. Crosslisted as: ANTH   448/ENGL   455/FRLG   448.

LING   552. Teaching English as a Second Language. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides students who plan to teach English to people whose native language is not English with techniques used in teaching foreign languages. Contrastive analysis of morphology, phonology and syntax are used to isolate areas of difficulty in learning English. Crosslisted as: ENGL   552/TEDU   552.

LING   650. Second Language Acquisition. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed for those who plan to work with English language learners in diverse instructional settings. A major focus of this course is analyzing second language acquisition theories and how they apply in classroom settings. In-depth analysis of readings will enhance the students’ understanding of second language acquisition and the research related to this field. Students will observe classroom teaching, analyzing the application of SLA theories utilized in the instructional setting. Crosslisted as: TEDU   650.