PHAR   201. Introduction to Pharmacy. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Open to undergraduate students with an interest in pursuing pharmacy as a career. Consists of presentations related to the profession of pharmacy and the pharmaceutical sciences, preparing for admission to the School of Pharmacy and employment opportunities in the profession after graduation. Graded as pass/fail.

PHAR   509. Evidence-Based Pharmacy I: Introduction to Pharmacy Information Skills. 1.5 Hour.

Semester course; 1.5 lecture hours. 1.5 credits. This is the first of a three-course series introducing students to information skills necessary for the practice of evidence-based pharmacy. Lecture topics include drug information resources, efficient information retrieval, assessment of drug information sources, relationship of pharmaceutical industry to drug literature, and basic laws and regulations associated with prescription processing. Class exercises will be used to promote the appropriate use of drug information resources in pharmacy practice.

PHAR   512. Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Introduction to the role of the pharmacist in health promotion and disease prevention. Skills for pharmacist involvement in implementing aspects of Healthy People 2010, educating patients and addressing health care disparities will be emphasized.

PHAR   513. Contemporary Pharmacy Practice. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Introduction to foundational concepts of pharmacy practice, professionalism, evolving roles of pharmacists in U.S. health care and forces that influence the profession through discussions, debates and panel presentations. An introduction to state laws that affect pharmacy practice and the provision of pharmacy care are provided. Students will be introduced to the management of secure, innovative pharmacy services, including the medication use system, and integrated patient care.

PHAR   523. Foundations I. 1.5 Hour.

Semester course; 4.5 laboratory hours. 1.5 credits. This competency-based course is intended to give the first-year pharmacy student an introduction to the pharmacy profession, emphasizing the skills and values that are necessary to be a competent, caring pharmacist. It is the first in a six-semester practice-based course sequence that introduces the language and tools of contemporary pharmacy practice with an emphasis on calculations, communication, medical terminology, drug information, prescription processing, health promotion, patient assessment and problem solving.

PHAR   524. Foundations II. 1.5 Hour.

Semester course; 4.5 laboratory hours. 1.5 credits. This competency-based course is the second in a six-semester practice-based course sequence with an emphasis on the preparation and dispensing of selected extemporaneous compounds including liquid, solid and semisolid preparations and the appropriate use of selected OTC point-of-care devices.

PHAR   525. Communications in Pharmacy Practice. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 1.5 lecture hours and an average of 1 conference hour per week. 2 credits. A study of the theory and techniques of communication and counseling techniques related to pharmacy practice. Supervised practice in developing basic communication skills.

PHAR   526. Community Pharmacy Practice. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Helps students develop the necessary foundation for the management of activities in community pharmacy practice settings with many of the skills developed in this course being equally applicable to other practice settings. Focuses on financial management and managed care as it affects community practice.

PHAR   529. Clinical Therapeutics Module: Introduction to Special Populations. 2 Hours.

Module course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Introduction to issues affecting the pharmacotherapy of special populations such as pediatric and geriatric patients.

PHAR   530. Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience: Community Practice. 4 Hours.

Semester course; daily for 4 weeks. 4 credits. Students will meet with an assigned community pharmacist 5 days per week for 8 hours for 4 consecutive weeks at the end of the P-1 year. Students will practice pharmacy under supervision while learning about the medication use system in community pharmacy practice. Students will demonstrate core practice skills: communication, pharmacy calculations, ethics, medication safety, wellness and health promotion, informatics and critical thinking. Graded as honors, high pass, pass, fail.

PHAR   532. Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience: Hospital Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 40 hours per week for three weeks. 3 credits. Students will meet with an assigned hospital pharmacist for a three-week (120 hours) experience at the end of the P-2 year to practice pharmacy in a hospital environment and learn about hospital pharmacy management and medication distribution systems. Students will demonstrate core practice skills: communication, calculations, ethics, medication safety, technology, informatics and critical thinking. Graded as honors, high pass, pass, fail.

PHAR   533. Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience: Service-learning. 0.5 Hours.

Semester course; .5 credits. Students will complete 20 hours of approved service-learning experiences under supervision. Reading assignments and assessments will be conducted. Students will also prepare a reflection describing the benefits to the community when pharmacists engage in the health and education needs of the community. Students will develop a sense of personal responsibility for addressing the problems and needs of society. Graded as pass/fail.

PHAR   534. Foundations III. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 3 laboratory hours. 1 credit. This competency-based course is the third in a six-semester practice-based course sequence with an emphasis on the clinical application of medications in the management of various disease states. The second-year pharmacy student will develop skills in the assessment and therapeutic monitoring of selected disease states and drug therapies. Topics include cardiovascular, endocrine and neurology therapeutics.

PHAR   535. Foundations IV. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 3 laboratory hours. 1 credit. This competency-based course is the fourth in a six-semester practice-based course sequence. Introduces students to the skills required to practice in institutional settings such as hospitals and long-term care facilities and in home health care.

PHAR   540. Self-Care and Alternative and Complementary Treatments. 2.5 Hours.

Module course; variable lecture and conference hours. 2.5 credits. Introduction to the concepts of self-care and alternative and complementary treatments. Students will learn to distinguish treatable signs and symptoms of common diseases and exclusions for care that require referral to appropriate health care practitioners. Non-medication methods to alleviate and prevent self-care problems are reviewed. Patient cases, self-care consultations, lectures and conferences will be used to facilitate learning.

PHAR   541. Patient Assessment in Pharmacy Practice. 2 Hours.

Semester course; variable lecture and laboratory hours. 2 credits. Provides students with an introduction to patient assessment skills necessary in patient-centered pharmacy practice. Course topics include basic physical assessment techniques, interpretation of findings from laboratory tests or physical examinations and documenting findings from patient assessments. Laboratory time will be used to practice various assessment skills. The course will also build on communication and information skills presented in previous courses.

PHAR   544. Clinical Therapeutics Module: Cardiovascular. 4.5 Hours.

Module course; variable hours. 4.5 credits. The principles of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutics, pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy to the application of drug therapy in patients with cardiovascular diseases are integrated in this course. The clinical presentation, course of illness, prevention and treatment of diseases using prescription, non-prescription and complementary treatments will be reviewed.

PHAR   545. The U.S. Health Care System. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Open to professional students only. Designed to introduce the student to the components of the U.S. health care system and the interrelationships among health care consumers and providers. It also presents the organizational framework and regulatory and reimbursement mechanisms which are the foundations of the U.S. health care delivery system. A unique feature of this course is the interdisciplinary teaching team.

PHAR   547. Managing Professional Patient-centered Practice. 1.5 Hour.

Semester course; 1.5 lecture hours. 1.5 credits. Introduces pharmacy students to the basic principles of managing a professional pharmacy practice. Students will learn patient-centered practices associated with effective medication use and positive patient outcomes. Instruction will be through lectures, case discussions and portfolio assignments.

PHAR   549. Pharmacogenetics. 1 Hour.

and Pharmacogenomics Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Provides an introduction to pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics as related to pharmacy practice. The course will be taught using lectures, individual work, small-group discussions and total classroom discussion using homework, in-class assignments and patient case scenarios.

PHAR   550. Pharmacy Practice Research. 3 Hours.

Yearlong course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Focuses on the development of skills necessary for identifying issues and questions related to pharmacy practice, evaluating the literature to identify possible solutions, designing a feasible research project, developing a data analysis plan and a formal written proposal for the project. Students will ultimately present their research proposals to faculty and students. The course is graded as CO with no credit for fall semester with a letter grade and credit assigned for spring semester.

PHAR   555. Clinical Therapeutics Module: Endocrinology. 2.5 Hours.

Module course; variable hours. 2.5 credits. The principles of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutics, pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy to the application of drug therapy in patients with endocrine diseases are integrated in this course. The clinical presentation, course of illness, prevention and treatment of diseases using prescription, non-prescription and complementary treatments will be reviewed.

PHAR   556. Clinical Therapeutics Module: Neurology. 4 Hours.

Module course; variable hours. 4 credits. The principles of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutics, pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy to the application of drug therapy in patients with neurological diseases are integrated in this course. The clinical presentation, course of illness, prevention and treatment of diseases using prescription, non-prescription and complementary treatments will be reviewed.

PHAR   565. Evidence-based Pharmacy II: Research Methods and Statistics. 2.5 Hours.

Module course; variable hours. 2.5 credits. This is the second of a three-course series introducing students to the principles and practice of evidence-based pharmacy. Lecture topics include research methods, concepts and principles of study design, and appropriate use of statistics. Class exercises promote a working understanding of statistical principles and a general understanding of research methods.

PHAR   566. Evidence-based Pharmacy III: Drug Literature Evaluation. 2 Hours.

Module course; variable hours. 2 credits. This is the third of a three-course series introducing students to the principles and practice of evidence-based pharmacy. Lectures, outside readings, class discussions and exercises will be used to develop the skills necessary for the evaluation of biomedical literature and application to pharmacy practice.

PHAR   602. Clinical Therapeutics Module: Psychiatry. 3 Hours.

Module course; variable hours. 3 credits. The principles of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutics, pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy to the application of drug therapy in patients with psychiatric illnesses are integrated in this course. The clinical presentation, course of illness, prevention and treatment of diseases using prescription, non-prescription and complementary treatments will be reviewed.

PHAR   603. Clinical Therapeutics Module: Respiratory/Immunology. 3 Hours.

Module course; variable hours. 3 credits. The principles of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutics, pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy to the application of drug therapy in patients with respiratory and immunologic illnesses are integrated in this course. The clinical presentation, course of illness, prevention and treatment of diseases using prescription, non-prescription and complementary treatments will be reviewed.

PHAR   604. Clinical Therapeutics Module: Infectious Diseases. 4.5 Hours.

Module course; variable hours. 4.5 credits. The principles of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutics, pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy to the application of drug therapy in patients with infectious diseases are integrated in this course. The clinical presentation, course of illness, prevention and treatment of diseases using prescription, non-prescription and complementary treatments will be reviewed.

PHAR   605. Clinical Therapeutics Module: Hematology/Oncology. 2.5 Hours.

Module course; variable hours. 2.5 credits. The principles of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutics, pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy to the application of drug therapy in patients with hematologic diseases and cancer are integrated in this course. The clinical presentation, course of illness, prevention and treatment of diseases using prescription, non-prescription and complementary treatments will be reviewed.

PHAR   606. Clinical Therapeutics Module: Nephrology/Urology. 2 Hours.

Module course; variable hours. 2 credits. The principles of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutics, pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy to the application of drug therapy in patients with kidney and urologic diseases are integrated in this course. The clinical presentation, course of illness, prevention and treatment of diseases using prescription, non-prescription and complementary treatments will be reviewed.

PHAR   607. Clinical Therapeutics Module: Dermatology/EENT. 2 Hours.

and Joint Module course; variable hours. 2 credits. The principles of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutics, pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy to the application of drug therapy in patients with diseases of the bone, skin, ears, eyes, nose and throat are integrated in this course. The clinical presentation, course of illness, prevention and treatment of diseases using prescription, non-prescription and complementary treatments will be reviewed.

PHAR   614. Research Techniques. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. Variable credit. Credit will be given on the basis of 1 credit per 45 hours of laboratory time. Prerequisite: approval of research adviser. Provides new graduate student with the laboratory skills necessary to perform research in the chosen discipline. The training time required will depend upon the discipline. Graded as pass/fail. Crosslisted as: PCEU   614/MEDC   614.

PHAR   618. Clinical Therapeutics Module: Gastrointestinal/Nutrition. 2.5 Hours.

Module course; variable hours. 2.5 credits. The principles of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutics, pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy to the application of drug therapy in patients with gastrointestinal diseases are integrated in this course. Nutrition will be covered. The clinical presentation, course of illness, prevention and treatment of diseases using prescription, non-prescription and complementary treatments will be reviewed.

PHAR   619. Clinical Therapeutics Module: Women's Health/Bone. 2 Hours.

Module course; variable hours. 2 credits. The principles of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutics, pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy to the application of drug therapy in women's health issues and patients with bone diseases are integrated in this course. The clinical presentation, course of illness, prevention and treatment of diseases using prescription, non-prescription and complementary treatments will be reviewed.

PHAR   620. Clinical Therapeutics Module: Critical Care/Toxicology. 2.5 Hours.

and Complex Patients Module course; variable hours. 2.5 credits. The principles of medicinal chemistry, pharmacology, pharmaceutics, pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy to the application of drug therapy in patients in critical care units and in toxicology, including bioterrorism, are presented. Drug therapy use in the geriatric population will be used as a framework for complex patient care.

PHAR   621. Pharmacoeconomics. 2 Hours.

Module course; variable hours. 2 credits. Introduces the terms and processes of pharmaceutical economics and phamacoeconomics. Students learn to assess the impact of economics on phamaceutical use, evaluate pharmacoeconomic studies and make decisions on the cost effectiveness of therapeutic alternatives. Lectures, discussion and class assignments.

PHAR   622. Epidemiology and Pharmacy Practice. 2 Hours.

Module course; variable hours. 2 credits. Introduction to the principles of epidemiology and the relation to pharmacy practice. Emphasis on applications of epidemiologic principles in pharmacy. Lectures, outside readings, class discussions and exercises.

PHAR   623. Patient Medication Safety. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Provides the fundamental background necessary to understand patient medication safety, including multidisciplinary responsibilities for medication safety and approaches to the management and prevention of medication errors. Current issues in medication safety and actual medication error cases will be used in the class.

PHAR   626. Advanced Pharmacotherapy Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. This course focuses on research techniques used to assess the clinical response to drug therapy, including advantages and disadvantages of different techniques. Published clinical trails are evaluated to illustrate these concepts including statistical assessment. Recent FDA New Drug Applications are reviewed when appropriate to illustrate regulatory aspects of the evaluation of clinical trials.

PHAR   631. Advanced Pharmacy Practice Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Classical, social, and systems views of management are introduced with emphasis on the uses of implicit control. The sociology of professions and the nature of professional work are explored; the management of the professional's work is discussed in detail. Design and operation of integrated drug information, drug distribution, and drug use control systems is explored. (Nontraditional program).

PHAR   637. Introduction to Research Methods in Pharmaceutical Sciences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Assists practicing pharmacist managers and researchers in the development, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of programs for the delivery of pharmaceutical care and the practice of pharmacy. Introduces students to the empirical method and to provide them with a fundamental knowledge base for developing salient research questions that could lead to the articulation of testable research hypotheses, accomplished by addressing those research techniques and designs most commonly used in pharmacy and health services research.

PHAR   638. Pharmaceutical Benefit Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Addresses the need for pharmacy benefit management, the types of organizations that use pharmacy benefit management and the primary tools, techniques and practices used to manage the pharmacy benefit. Presents through lectures, readings, class discussions and a research paper.

PHAR   640. Foundations V. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 3 laboratory hours. 1 credit. This competency-based course is the fifth in a six-semester practice-based course sequence with an emphasis on the clinical application of medications in the management of various disease states. The third-year pharmacy student will develop skills in the assessment and therapeutic monitoring of selected disease states and drug therapies. Topics include infectious disease, oncology, nephrology and urology therapeutics.

PHAR   645. Foundations VI. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 3 laboratory hours. 1 credit. This competency-based course is the final installment in a six-semester, practice-based course sequence. It is intended to give the third-year pharmacy student opportunities to improve acquired skills and gain additional skills necessary to provide the highest level of patient-centered care by optimizing drug therapy outcomes.

PHAR   651. Medical Access and Care for Underserved Populations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; lecture and experiential hours. 3 credits. Provides an overview of the issues affecting medical access for underserved populations, with an emphasis on homeless patients. Topics covered include resources, unique barriers, health literacy, interdisciplinary models in safety net organizations and medication reconciliation. Students attend lectures and complete experiential exercises to reinforce these topics, as well as creating patient education materials.

PHAR   652. Health Promotion and Communication in Pharmacy Practice. 2.5 Hours.

Semester course; 2.5 lecture hours. 2.5 credits. An introduction to the role of the pharmacist in health promotion and disease prevention and building communication skills to help prepare students for practice. Supervised practice in developing basic communication skills. Skills for pharmacist involvement in implementing aspects of Healthy People 2020, educating patients and addressing health care disparities will be emphasized.

PHAR   660. Community Pharmacy Practice Management II. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Helps students develop the necessary foundation for the management of activities in community pharmacy practice settings with many of the skills developed in the course being equally applicable to other practice settings. This course focuses on developing and marketing community pharmacy services.

PHAR   661. Institutional Pharmacy Management. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Introduces students to the practice and management of pharmacy in institutional settings -- hospitals, long-term care facilities, managed care settings and home health care. Students will learn issues unique to institutional practice and best practices for improving medication therapy in institutions. Faculty presentations, guest lectures, class exercises and outside assignments.

PHAR   662. Leadership and Advocacy. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 credits. Provides leadership and political advocacy development for students, including the officers of student organizations and those who wish to become leaders in the profession. Students will examine leadership as they explore current health care issues and gain direct experience in community action and the political advocacy process. From a broad perspective, all health care professions need effective leadership, and in turn effective political advocacy, to deal with the numerous issues facing the health care system. Many students are seeking new ways to understand and solve local and national problems, to demystify politics and to make concrete changes by having direct contact with public individuals. To meet these needs, the goals of this course are to strengthen the leadership ability of students and to enhance their potential for future leadership and advocacy roles within their profession and their communities. Graded H/P/F.

PHAR   663. Advanced Diabetes Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An in-depth study of the care of patients with metabolic syndrome and diabetes. The etiology, pathophysiology, clinical course, clinical manifestations, prevention and management of diabetes will be reviewed through the use of online didactic presentations, patient cases, self-directed learning and active participation in classroom discussion. Emphasis is placed on the use of data to optimize pharmacotherapy for patient scenarios.

PHAR   666. Advanced Topics in Pharmacy. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Presentation of pharmacy subject matter by lectures, conferences or clinical site visits in selected areas of advanced study providing a discussion of topics beyond that provided in the required curriculum.

PHAR   670. Geriatric Pharmacy Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Students learn therapeutic aspects of providing health care to elderly people. Sociobehavioral aspects of aging related to pharmacotherapy outcomes also will be learned. Problems associated with drug use in the elderly and the importance of providing quality pharmaceutical care to ambulatory and institutionalized geriatric individuals will be emphasized.

PHAR   671. Applied Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Presents theoretical and practical topics relating to pharmacoeconomics and health outcomes research. Students will learn to critically appraise and discuss pharmaceutical outcomes research through lectures, readings, class participation and projects. Requires students to plan, initiate and present an outcomes research project that considers both clinical and economic issues of product or service selection.

PHAR   672. Advances in Mental Health Pharmacy Practice. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Students choose the topics for discussion in this elective course. They actively learn through small group discussions of the pharmacotherapy of psychiatric disorders. Students gain experience in patient rounds, practice-based projects, interpretation of clinical practice guidelines, use of the Internet and computer presentations.

PHAR   673. Advanced Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: PHAR   544. Students will gain a broader knowledge and deeper understanding of the etiology, pathophysiology, clinical course, clinical manifestations, prevention and management of cardiovascular disorders through the use of online didactic presentations, videos, patient cases, self-directed learning and active participation in classroom discussion.

PHAR   674. Advances in Community Pharmacy Practice and Therapeutics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 1 conference hours. 3 credits. This course will enable students to enhance their community practice and patient care skills. It will address strategies for marketing and documentation of clinical services including disease management, wellness and screening programs pertinent to community pharmacy practice. Students will visit community pharmacies for the practice component of this course.

PHAR   677. Infectious Diseases Pharmacotherapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed to familiarize the student with principles of the rational treatment of human infectious diseases. Emphasis will be placed on learning the pharmacology, toxicology and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of antimicrobial agents; problems of antimicrobial resistance and the role of the pharmacist in combating resistance; the methods of obtaining and evaluating culture and susceptibility reports; and familiarity with infectious diseases literature. Students will attend daily consultation rounds with the infectious diseases service and will meet with the preceptor to discuss patients and plan for contributions to patient care.

PHAR   678. Women's Health: Pharmacotherapeutic Issues and Controversies. 2.5 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2.5 credits. This course addresses the prevention and management of disease in women. It is designed to expand upon the women's health topics presented in the pharmacotherapy course series. Problem-based learning, student presentations and clinical projects serve as the primary teaching methods.

PHAR   679. Critical Care Pharmacotherapy. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. This course consists of online recorded discussions and case presentations to familiarize the student with critical care pharmacotherapy. In addition to a discussion of various disease states, information will be provided about the critically ill patient, the environment of the intensive care unit and the role of the critical care pharmacist. The course is presented in a self-study, online format. Graded as H/P/F.

PHAR   685. Contemporary Topics in Pharmacy. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Explores how pharmacists prepare for and respond to the issues that affect the practice of pharmacy. Contemporary issues that relate to major health care needs, government health care activities, views by health professionals, health policies, health care economics, pharmacist attitudes and behaviors, pharmacy laws and regulations, pharmacy traditional views and opinions will be examined. Discussion and debate on these issues will help to prepare students for their future in pharmacy practice.

PHAR   686. Entrepreneurial Pharmacy and Independent Pharmacy Practice. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours/10 weeks. 2 credits. Provides a practical review of independent pharmacy practice from starting to running a pharmacy. Topics include financing, marketing, niche markets, store design and merchandising, technology, business relations, and contracts. The course will be taught through presentations/discussions by guest lecturers and a project.

PHAR   687. Introduction to Research in Pharmacy. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. A broad overview of the types of research conducted in the profession of pharmacy with a focus on clinical research. Students will achieve a broad appreciation of the research opportunities available in pharmacy and guidance in pursuit of a career in research. Format will consist of lectures, interactive discussions and demonstrations. Graded P/R.

PHAR   688. Applied Pharmacoepidemiology Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: EPID   571 and BIOS   544 or permission of instructor. Provides an overview of the field of pharmacoepidemiology and its relationship to health care and research. Topics including selecting data sources, study design, data manipulation and analytical issues relevant to the conduct of pharmacoepidemiology research are covered. Students complete exercises to reinforce these topics, as well as prepare a formal project proposal. Research studies are also reviewed to help students develop skills in the critical evaluation of the pharmacoepidemiology literature.

PHAR   689. Pharmaceutical Policy Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON   500 or ECON/HADM   624, or permission of instructor. Examines a breadth of pharmaceutical policy issues pertaining to stakeholders in health care including the federal government, state governments, the pharmaceutical industry, pharmacies and pharmacists, and consumers. Using an economic approach to policy analysis, various competing thoughts and challenges to health care will be presented. Special attention will be paid to theoretical foundations and scientific rigor in approaching policy analysis.

PHAR   690. Pharmacy Research Seminar. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Required of all graduate students in pharmacy. Research seminar.

PHAR   691. Special Topics in Pharmacy. 1-5 Hours.

Semester course; 1-5 lecture hours. 1-5 credits. Presentation of subject matter is by lectures, tutorial studies and/or library assignments in selected areas of advanced study not available in other courses or as part of the research training. Graded as honors, high pass, pass, fail.

PHAR   697. Directed Research in Pharmacy. 1-15 Hours.

Semester course; 1-15 credits. Research leading to the M.S., Pharm.D., or Ph.D. degree.

PHAR   724. Pharmacy Law. 2.5 Hours.

Semester course; 2.5 lecture hours. 2.5 credits. A study of federal and state laws, including statutes, regulations and cases, affecting the practice of pharmacy and the distribution of drugs. This course includes material on ethics.

PHAR   760. Acute Care Pharmacy Practice I. 5 Hours.

Semester course; daily for 5 weeks. 5 credits. This course consists of 200 hours of advanced pharmacy practice experience in an acute care hospital setting. Students will actively participate in the delivery of patient care on a general medicine service. Students may participate in the following types of activities: rounding with a health care team, obtaining patient histories, identifying problems requiring therapeutic interventions, solving problems, consulting with physicians, monitoring patient outcomes and providing educational sessions for the professional staff. These services are expected to be integrated with the hospital pharmacy services. Graded as H/HP/P/F.

PHAR   761. Advanced Hospital Pharmacy Practice. 5 Hours.

Semester course; daily for 5 weeks. 5 credits. This course consists of 200 hours of advanced pharmacy practice experience in a hospital pharmacy department. Students will actively participate in pharmacy operations and services relating to systems for drug distribution and drug control, scope of clinical services provided by the department, management of the department, and department relationships within the institution and health system. Graded as H/HP/P/F.

PHAR   762. Geriatrics Pharmacy Practice. 5 Hours.

Semester course; daily for 5 weeks. 5 credits. This course consists of 200 hours of advanced pharmacy practice experience in a variety of settings with a predominately geriatric focus. These sites may include community pharmacies, specialty clinics, rehabilitation hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, home-based consult services and assisted living facilities. Students will focus on the unique medication-related needs of seniors and actively apply that special knowledge to provide quality pharmacy care to older adults. Graded as H/HP/P/F.

PHAR   763. Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Practice. 5 Hours.

Semester course; daily for 5 weeks. 5 credits. This course consists of 200 hours of advanced pharmacy practice experience in an ambulatory care, multidisciplinary practice setting. These sites may include hospital-based clinics, physician group practices, safety net clinics and managed care facilities that provide health care directly to patients. Students will actively participate in obtaining patient medical and medication histories, evaluating drug therapies, developing pharmacy care plans, monitoring patients’ therapeutic outcomes, consulting with physicians and non-physician providers and providing education to patients and health care professionals. Graded as H/HP/P/F.

PHAR   764. Community Pharmacy Practice. 5 Hours.

Semester course; daily for 5 weeks. 5 credits. In this course, students will participate in all facets of pharmacy practice in the community pharmacy setting. Students will be involved in dispensing, compounding, telephone consultation, patient counseling and nonprescription drug recommendations. Students also will be involved in patient assessment, monitoring intervention and follow-up care designed to improve the outcomes of drug therapy. Graded as H/HP/P/F.

PHAR   765. Elective I. 5 Hours.

Semester course; daily for 5 weeks. 5 credits. In this course, students will be able to participate in a variety of pharmacy practice settings. Graded as H/HP/P/F.

PHAR   766. Elective II. 5 Hours.

Semester course; daily for 5 weeks. 5 credits. In this course students participate in a variety of pharmacy practice settings. Graded as H/HP/P/F.

PHAR   767. Clinical Selective I. 5 Hours.

Semester course; daily for 5 weeks. 5 credits. Restricted to Pharm.D. dual-degree candidates. In this course students participate in a clinical rotation and may choose one of these pharmacy practice settings: ambulatory care, acute care, advanced community, institutional or geriatric. Graded as H/HP/P/F.

PHAR   768. Advanced Community Pharmacy Practice. 5 Hours.

Semester course; daily for 5 weeks. 5 credits. This course consists of 200 hours of advanced pharmacy practice experience in a community pharmacy setting. Students will focus primarily on patient care services and secondarily on patient-focused dispensing functions in these pharmacies. These services will focus on the identification, resolution and prevention of medication-related problems dealing with general medicine issues and medication therapy management. Students will actively participate in the following types of activities: interacting with patients, caregivers and prescribers; counseling, self-care consults and recommendations; administration of immunizations; and health and wellness screenings and information. Graded as H/HP/P/F.

PHAR   769. Clinical Selective II. 5 Hours.

Semester course; daily for 5 weeks (200 clinical hours). 5 credits. Restricted to Pharm.D. dual-degree candidates. In this course students participate in a clinical rotation and may choose one of these pharmacy practice settings: ambulatory care, acute care, advanced community, institutional or geriatric. Graded as H/HP/P/F.

PHAR   771. Student Pharmacist Professionalism. 1 Hour.

Continuing course; variable hours. 1 credit at end of four-year curriculum. Selected presentations and activities related to the development and enhancement of professional behavior in student pharmacists. Graded as CO until final semester, with pass/fail awarded on completion.

PHAR   773. Acute Care Pharmacy Practice II. 5 Hours.

Semester course; daily for 5 weeks. 5 credits. This course consists of 200 hours of advanced pharmacy practice experience in an acute care hospital setting. Students participate in the delivery of patient care in a general medicine or a medical specialty service. Students may participate in the following types of activities: rounding with a health care team, obtaining patient histories, identifying problems requiring therapeutic interventions, solving problems, consulting with physicians, monitoring patient outcomes and providing educational sessions for the professional staff. These services are expected to be integrated with the hospital pharmacy services. Graded as H/HP/P/F.