PSYC 101. Introduction to Psychology. 4 Hours.Play VideoPlay course video for Introduction to Psychology

Semester course; 3 lecture and 1 computer-assisted instructional hours. 4 credits. A survey of the basic principles, methods of investigation and fields of study and application. Includes individualized application of principles and methods in computerized learning activities. This course is a prerequisite for upper-level work in the field of psychology.

PSYC 201. Career Development in Psychology. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Introduction to the discipline of psychology and the career alternatives available in various specialties. Self-assessment, career decision-making skills, educational program planning methods will be covered. Special topics will include graduate/professional school options, opportunities for minority students and job search strategies for the B.A. or B.S. psychology major.

PSYC 214. Applications of Statistics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and STAT 210 both with a minimum grade of C. Frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and variability; sampling, probability, correlation and significance tests as applied in psychological data.

PSYC 301. Child Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. A study is made of the growth and development of the child until puberty. Childlike is viewed in terms of physical, mental, social, emotional and educational factors. PSYC 304 Life Span Developmental Psychology also may not be taken for credit.

PSYC 302. Psychology of Adolescence. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PSYC 101. A study of mental, moral, social and physical development from puberty to maturity viewed as in child psychology. Designed for secondary school teachers, youth leaders and professional psychologists.

PSYC 303. Personal Adjustment. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Surveys major theories of personality as a basis for studying theory, research and intervention into areas that require personal adjustment. Such areas include sense of self, stress and coping, work and career and several varieties of interpersonal relationships. Positive adjustment and growth as well as problems are discussed.

PSYC 304. Life Span Developmental Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Reviews the basic concepts and principles of physical, cognitive and social development at each major stage of life-prenatal, infancy, toddlerhood, preschool, middle childhood, adolescence, adulthood and old age. Consideration is given to the study of development at each stage of life and to different theoretical explanations for development. PSYC 301 Child Psychology may not also be taken for credit.

PSYC 305. Educational Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. The application of psychological principles to the teaching-learning process, with special emphasis on theories of learning and development. Crosslisted as: EDUS 305.

PSYC 306. Psychology of Adult Development. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. The life stages and transitions of the young adult, middle age and young-old phases of the life cycle are considered, following a review of methods of research within life-span development psychology. Topics include the impact of events such as birth of the first child, job relocation, mid-life re-evaluation and anticipated retirement.

PSYC 307. Community Solutions: Multiple Perspectives. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Explores possibilities for addressing social concerns of the Richmond community by understanding the complex nature of social issues as essential to their successful amelioration via perspectives of life and social sciences. Toward this end, expertise from the social sciences, the life sciences and the community are integrated. Includes a service-learning experience (a 20-hour volunteer requirement). Crosslisted as: LFSC 307.

PSYC 308. Stress and its Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Physiological and psychological aspects of stressors and the stress response. Review of principles, research and methods of stress management, such as relaxation, self-suggestions, meditation and biofeedback.

PSYC 309. Personality. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. The study of the various approaches to understanding human behavior in terms of personality theory. Various theories will be examined for commonality and uniqueness in assumptions, dynamics and development of personality.

PSYC 310. Industrial Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Application of psychological principles and techniques to problems in personnel management and human engineering; recruitment, selection, training and placement in industry; criteria in testing and test development; morale evaluation and improvement, employee counseling; work-management communications; human engineering in equipment design, quality control, working conditions and safety.

PSYC 317. Experimental Methods. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 214 with a minimum grade of C. Introduction to experimental procedures and laboratory techniques in psychology. Demonstrations and experiments in sensation, perception, learning, emotion and motivation.

PSYC 318. Principles of Psychological Tests and Measurements. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: minimum grade of C in PSYC 101 and minimum grade of C in STAT 210. Concepts in psychological measurement and a survey of commonly used tests; testing procedures and rationale underlying these tests; tests of intelligence, aptitude, achievement, interest and personality critically examined, procedures described for selecting and evaluating specific group tests in these areas.

PSYC 321. Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Survey theory and research in social psychology. Topics include interpersonal and social influence processes, attitudes and social cognition, the impact of personality on social behavior, conformity, leadership and small group behavior.

PSYC 322. Personality and Behavior of the African American. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. A study of personality factors such as motivation, ego-functioning and the socialization processes, with special emphasis on living conditions of African-Americans. Crosslisted as: AFAM 322.

PSYC 323. Interpersonal Relations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Analyzes human relations from various theoretical perspectives. Typical topics include the effects of attraction, friendship, love and dependency on relationships; the evolution of relationships from initiation through termination. Strategies for increasing effectiveness of communication between individuals also are addressed.

PSYC 333. Psychology and Religious Experience. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Religious belief and experience as viewed by major psychological theorists. How psychological methodology has been used to study religious experience. Topics include personality factors and development, conversion experiences, religious experiences and mental health and human values. Crosslisted as: RELS 333.

PSYC 335. Psychology of Women. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Overview of issues in psychology relevant to women. Topics include: research methods of women's issues; sex-role socialization; women and hormones; psychological androgyny; personality theory and counseling strategies for women; women and language; women and violence; and rape and abuse. Crosslisted as: GSWS 335.

PSYC 340. Introduction to the Helping Relationship. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Overview to the dynamics of communication in a helping relationship. Didactic material includes the principles of empathy, nonverbal behavior, problem-solving, crisis intervention and interview techniques. Basic paraprofessional counselor skills will be demonstrated and practiced through structured exercises.

PSYC 341. Group Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Social and psychological principles and research related to the individual in groups. Specific topics include motivation for individuals forming and joining groups, performance and productivity of group members, group leadership and majority and minority influence. The group will be examined in relation to the larger society and as a subculture in itself. Crosslisted as: SOCY 341.

PSYC 401. Physiological Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Data from the fields of anatomy and physiology are presented, and their implications for psychology are discussed. The central nervous system, internal environment, vision, audition, reflexes, emotion, learning behavior disorders and their physiological components. Behavior of the human organisms is studied from the biopsychological point of view.

PSYC 404. Social Psychology of Emotions. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, SOCY 101. An examination of the social shaping of emotion as well as its function in maintaining the social process. Cross-cultural uniformities and diversity in basic emotions and their expression are addressed as well as selected social psychological theories of emotions.

PSYC 406. Perception. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Perception of information from sensory systems with concentration on vision and hearing. Research and theories on how we learn and judge color, form, movement, depth and how individuals integrate these in object identification.

PSYC 407. Psychology of the Abnormal. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Development of personality is discussed, with emphasis on factors leading to maladjustment. Lectures and reading cover the symptom groups of emotional disorders of both psychological and organic origin. Methods of assessing and treating these disorders are surveyed.

PSYC 410. Principles of Learning and Cognition. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Comprehensive treatment of learning and cognition with emphasis on humans, from behavioral, cognitive, biological and developmental viewpoints. Topics include conditioning, information processing, memory, sociobiology and cognitive and moral development.

PSYC 412. Health Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Application of the principles and techniques of psychology to the field of medicine, to health maintenance and to illness. The integration of theoretical, research and applied issues is emphasized in the analysis of such topics as psychological/behavioral factors contributing to and protecting against physical illness (stress, smoking, exercise), factors relating to treatment and recovery (coping, treatment compliance), psychological problems resulting from illness and injury, and specific techniques and problem areas in health psychology (such as biofeedback, pain management, pediatric psychology, geropsychology, rehabilitation psychology and lifestyle change.).

PSYC 414. Psychology of Women's Health. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Overviews the psychological research on women's health. Topics include health behavior change, personality and individual differences, cognitive factors, disease-specific behaviors and interventions. Crosslisted as: GSWS 414.

PSYC 426. Child Psychopathology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PSYC 101. Principal childhood behavioral abnormalities. A review of causes, assessment and diagnostic methods, and treatment, intervention and prevention approaches.

PSYC 451. History of Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and senior standing. Traces the history of ideas about mind and behavior as they relate to the theory and practice of psychology.

PSYC 491. Topics in Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Maximum total of 6 credits in topics courses. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. An in-depth study of selected topics and issues in psychology. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered.

PSYC 492. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1, 2 or 3 credits per semester. Maximum of 6 credits for all independent study courses. PSYC 492, PSYC 493 or PSYC 494 may be repeated for a total of 6 credits but a maximum of 12 credits total for all three courses. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Open only to students of junior or senior standing who have acquired at least 12 credits in the departmental discipline. Determination of the amount of credit and permission of instructor and department chair must be procured prior to registration of the course. Independent study is defined as student-conceived and initiated readings or research project which is supervised by a psychology faculty member. An oral examination or written, comprehensive paper is required at the end of the semester.

PSYC 493. Fieldwork: Human Services. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. PSYC 492, PSYC 493 and PSYC 494 may be repeated for a total of 6 credits but a maximum of 12 credits total for all three courses is allowed. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Students are placed in an agency, which will provide supervised work experience in various aspects of helping other people. The setting might be a government or private community agency, or a corporation, depending on the student's goals. The student works eight hours per week at the placement site, attends several group discussion sessions during the semester and completes written assignments. This course is designed to enhance the psychology major's career pursuits for either graduate-level training or post-baccalaureate employment.

PSYC 494. Research Internship in Psychology. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1, 2 or 3 credits per semester. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits with adviser's approval. PSYC 492, PSYC 493 or PSYC 494 may be repeated for a total of 6 credits but a maximum of 12 credits total for all three courses. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and permission of faculty research supervisor must be obtained prior to registration. PSYC 214 and PSYC 317, or permission of supervisor. Students will work on various phases of a research project (design, data collection, data analysis, manuscript writing) under a psychology faculty member's close supervision. This course is designed to enhance the psychology major's career pursuits for either graduate-level training or post-baccalaureate employment.

PSYC 497. Honors in Psychology I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PSYC 317 (co-requisite with permission) and admission to the honors in psychology program. First in a three course sequence to develop, execute and defend an empirically based thesis in psychology. Students will work with a mentor to develop ideas into a tangible research project, working toward a proposal.

PSYC 498. Honors in Psychology II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 497 with a grade of A. Students will refine research ideas developed in PSYC 497 into a formal proposal document with introduction, method and proposed results. Students are expected to propose the thesis to their committee members no later than the second week of this course and begin data collection thereafter.

PSYC 499. Honors in Psychology III. 3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 498 with a grade of A. Students will complete the research project developed in PSYC 497 and 498 and generate the final thesis, including introduction, method, results and discussion. Students must orally defend the thesis to their committee members by the end of this course with time for revisions to be submitted within the semester’s defined grading period.

PSYC 601. Foundations of Applied Developmental Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in the psychology program or permission of instructor. An introduction to developmental research and theory on applied research topics. Topics include ethical issues in applied developmental science, culture, ethnicity and child development, poverty, child abuse, nontraditional families, childcare, family instability, early childhood intervention and parenting.

PSYC 602. Psychology of Aging. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. Enrollment requires permission of instructor. Students must complete social sciences research methods before taking this course.Psychological adjustment in late life; special emphasis on personality, cognitive and emotional development; life crises associated with the aging process. Crosslisted as: GRTY 602.

PSYC 603. Developmental Processes. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Cognitive, social, personality and behavioral development across the life span is considered, with special attention to theories of development.

PSYC 604. Social Psychology of Business and Industry. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 630 or permission of instructor. The theme is the influence of organizational structure on behavior. Topics will include motivation, attitudes, job satisfaction, morale, leadership and supervision.

PSYC 605. Social Development. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 603 or permission of instructor. The development of social relations, focusing primarily on infancy and childhood, but also considering adulthood and aging. Attachment, parent-child interaction, peers, siblings, aggression, sex-roles, cultural determinants, deprivation and remediation, social cognition, adulthood changes, parenthood. Critical evaluation of theory and current research.

PSYC 606. Development in Middle Childhood. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in the psychology program or permission of instructor. An introduction to theory and research on children during middle childhood. Topics include language, intelligence, early education, schooling, social cognition, theory of mind, attachment, social competence, emotions and socialization.

PSYC 607. Advanced Educational Psychology for Elementary Teachers. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Application of the principles of psychology to the teaching-learning process in the elementary classroom. Discussion will focus on the comprehensive development of individual learning experiences and educational programs from the point of view of the educator and administrator. Crosslisted as: EDUS 607.

PSYC 608. Research in Counseling Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the counseling psychology program or permission of counseling committee. An introduction to the theoretical, procedural, methodological and ethical issues encountered during the conduct of empirical research in counseling psychology. Topics include the empirical analysis of such mainstream counseling research activities as assessment, interventions, consultation, supervision, training, psychosocial factors in health and prevention, career development, the study of diversity and underrepresented populations, and professional issues in counseling psychology.

PSYC 609. Contemporary Issues in Clinical Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: first-year graduate standing in clinical psychology or permission of the instructor. Informs first-year doctoral students of the philosophy behind the training model and the requirements of the doctoral program in clinical psychology in the context of the current status of contemporary issues in the field. Includes coverage of traditional and innovative training models, research issues, the role of assessment and psychotherapy in clinical psychology, the medical vs. the behavioral model of psychopathology, relations with other mental health professions, professional issues such as licensure and credentialing, and malpractice.

PSYC 610. Attitude Theory and Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Theory and research in attitudes. Attitude formation and change, including cognitive consistency, learning and reinforcement, social judgment, and functional theories.

PSYC 611. Contemporary Issues, Supervision and Leadership in Counseling Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Contemporary issues, problems and research related to the practice of counseling psychology; their importance in developing a professional identity and sensitivity to major developments in the field; history, present status and future directions in the field of counseling psychology.

PSYC 612. Seminar in Motivation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A survey of some theoretical views of motivation. Biological, cultural personality and learning theories of motivation will be covered. Theoretical positions will be related to current empirical findings.

PSYC 613. Cognitive Development. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/discussion hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology or permission of instructor. The development of the intellectual processes, including reasoning, memory, imagery and knowledge. Special attention will be given to theories of cognitive growth. Although the focus will be on child cognitive developments, consideration of life-span issues will be included.

PSYC 614. Development in Infancy and Early Childhood. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 603 or permission of instructor. An introduction to theory and research on children from birth to early childhood, including sensory and behavioral capacities; cognitive, social and emotional development; and contexts of development (especially the family). Emphasis on stage1salient tasks of development and the effects of early experience on function later in life. Consideration of the challenges associated with research and intervention with these age groups.

PSYC 615. Aging and Mental Disorders. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The course deals with common psychological disorders and problems of late life, their etiology, methods of evaluating psychological status and intervention strategies that have been used successfully with older persons. Topics include epidemiology of psychological disorders and mental health service utilization; late-life stressors and crises; psychology of health, illness and disability; techniques and procedures in the evaluation of the older adult; functional and organic disorders; institutionalization; individual, group and family therapy; behavioral techniques; peer counseling and crisis intervention; and drugs and the elderly. Crosslisted as: GRTY 615.

PSYC 616. Psychopathology. 1,3 Hour.

Semester course; variable hours. 1 or 3 credits. May be taken only one time for credit toward degree. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Clinical and experimental contributions to the field of psychopathology, with particular attention to the roles of learning and motivation in the development of behavior disorders.

PSYC 617. Sensation and Perception. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The major phenomena of vision, audition, olfaction, gustation and the skin senses. Psychophysics and the effects of sensory deficits. The relationship of variations in environmental energy to the psychological reactions of sensing and perceiving.

PSYC 618. Seminar in Personality. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A detailed exploration of various approaches in personality. Contemporary issues in personality theory.

PSYC 619. Learning and Cognition. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology or permission of instructor. Covers principles and theories of learning and cognitive psychology from simple associative learning through memory, comprehension, thinking and social behavior.

PSYC 620. Design and Analysis of Psychological Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: undergraduate course in basic statistics or permission of instructor. An introduction to research design in psychology (e.g., logic behind various research designs, typical research problems). Review of principles of hypothesis testing, general linear model, analysis of variance including factorial designs with special emphasis on prior and post-hoc comparisons, repeated-measures designs and mixed designs.

PSYC 622. Physiological Correlates of Emotion. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Research and theories of emotion emphasizing physiological bases, with special attention to neurological and endocrine systems. Applications to psychological functioning.

PSYC 623. Counseling Theories and Personality. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Enrollment requires permission of instructor. Overview of major trends in personality theory, techniques and current research in psychotherapies as they apply to counseling psychology. Includes descriptions of some brief psychoeducation and preventive interventions and stresses accountability in outcome of all interventions.

PSYC 624. Group Counseling and Psychotherapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Historical perspective. Basic dynamics and processes of therapeutic groups. Role and technique of the group facilitator. Examination of different theoretical approaches.

PSYC 625. Career Development and Occupational Health. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A review of major theories and current research in career development and topics in occupational health are presented. Theory, research and techniques associated with vocational assessment and intervention are reviewed. Emphasis on late adolescent and adult populations.

PSYC 626. Single-case Experimental Design for the Clinical Research Practitioner. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Review of single-case design models that have utility for clinicians in evaluating their practice. Emphasis will be placed on the historical development of the field and on the main experimental design issues that are relevant to the conduct of single-case research.

PSYC 627. Research Methods in Clinical Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 680 and graduate standing in clinical or counseling psychology, or permission of instructor. Examines the role of research in clinical psychology and experimental design issues in psychotherapy research.

PSYC 628. Psychology of Adolescence. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology or permission of instructor. Theories and research on the social, personality and cognitive development of adolescents. Emphasis is placed on the development of identity and relationships with family and peers, within the contexts of home, school, work and community. Variations in development related to cultural differences will also be the focus, but atypical behavior will be explored. Normal adolescent behavior will also be addressed. Current research ideas will be examined.

PSYC 629. Biological Basis of Behavior. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: an undergraduate course in physiological psychology or permission of instructor. Theory and current experimental research on the physiological and neurological concomitants of behavioral variables.

PSYC 630. Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Topics include attitudes, social influence processes, person perception, affiliation and attraction, group processes, cultural influences on behavior and conformity.

PSYC 631. Evaluation Research: Psychological Perspectives. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides the student with knowledge of and skills in evaluation research. Additionally, students will learn how to apply psychological theories and applied research methods in evaluating psychological interventions and treatment programs. The class covers several key aspects of evaluation: 1) use of psychological theory in evaluations, 2) defining the problem, 3) contextual issues surrounding the evaluation, 4) selecting the appropriate type and design of evaluation, 5) methodological issues and 6) steps involved in conducting an evaluation of process and outcome. Course will attend to: a) theoretical, b) political, social and contextual factors that impact an evaluation, c) cultural considerations when conducting an evaluation, d) practical and logistical considerations and e) effective collaboration with community partners. Course examples and materials will be drawn from the professor's experiences with evaluating community-based psychological interventions and prevention programs and the experiences of guest presenters.

PSYC 632. Research Methods in Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PSYC 680 and PSYC 630. Epistemological, methodological, technical and ethical problems encountered during the scientific study of social psychological phenomena. Emphasizes practical experience in theory development, hypothesis derivation, research planning, data collection, reduction and analysis, and dissemination strategies.

PSYC 633. Group Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 630 or permission of instructor. Theoretical explanations and empirical research related to group formation, development, performance and dissolution. Topics include obedience, conformity, group productivity and leadership.

PSYC 634. Attribution and Social Cognition. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 630. Analysis of the perceptual and inferential processes that influence the perceiver's understanding of others' traits and characteristics. Examines theoretical perspectives and current empirical studies of the intuitive use of behavioral data in making inferences concerning the causes of actions and events and the cognitive mechanisms that structure inferences about others' qualities.

PSYC 635. Psychology of Health and Health Care in the Elderly. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Presents health psychology models, theories and issues relating to the etiology, course and treatment of illness in the elderly. Covers older patient-practitioner interaction, compliance, late-life stress and illness, and psychosocial issues in terminal care.

PSYC 636. Research Methods in Developmental Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 680. Research designs, methods, ethical issues and problems specific to developmental psychology. Cross-sectional, longitudinal and sequential strategies. Statistical issues, multivariate statistics and choice of statistical designs appropriate for developmental research questions. Computer skills in organizing and analyzing data. Grant writing and scientific reporting.

PSYC 637. Operant Behavior. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology or permission of instructor. Presents an overview of the methodology, terminology and phenomena unique to the experimental analysis of behavior. Topics include operant methodology, schedules of reinforcement, stimulus control, acquisition of behavior, conditioned reinforcement, punishment, scheduled-induced behaviors and use of operant techniques in drug research.

PSYC 638. The Evolution of Psychological Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: core course in student's area of specialization or permission of instructor. A survey of the development and present state of various psychological systems. Current meta-theoretical and systematic issues in psychology.

PSYC 639. Research Methods in Biopsychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 4 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Methodological, technical and ethical problems in biopsychology. Examples are design and use of circuits in behavioral sciences, stereotaxic surgery, histology, drug procedures, research design, data collection procedures and data analysis.

PSYC 640. Parenting. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is about parenting. Students review and discuss theories and literature on human parenting, including the history of parenting, contextual issues in parenting, parenting at different stages of children's lives (from pregnancy and infancy through having adult children) and parenting children with special needs (including disabilities and behavior problems). Also covers parent training and education, the journey to becoming a parent through adoption, parenting contributions to social, emotional and cognitive competence, child maltreatment and public policy around parenting. Students review parenting in different family structures including married, never married, divorced and separated families. This is not a course on how to parent, but practical issues in the lives of parents are discussed.

PSYC 641. Survey of Psychological Assessment and Treatment of the Older Adult. 3 Hours.

3 credits. A combination didactic and skills training course; review of major treatment strategies and techniques for utilization with the older adult client with emphasis on group, individual and paraprofessional delivery systems; evaluation of crisis intervention and consultation team approaches; lectures, demonstration and classroom practice of actual treatment techniques. Crosslisted as: GRTY 641.

PSYC 642. Practicum in Clinical Geropsychology. 3 Hours.

3 credits. An initial practicum geared as an entry to the team practicum experience; focus on familiarizing the student with mental health service delivery systems for the elderly in the Richmond community; rotation through a limited number of facilities such as nursing homes, retirement centers, nutrition sites, emergency hotline services for the elderly and various agencies involved in deinstitutionalization; possible extended placement in a particular facility. Crosslisted as: GRTY 642.

PSYC 643. Principles of Psychological Measurement. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology or permission of instructor. Basic psychometric concepts to prepare the student for subsequent evaluation instruments. Origins and logic of testing, criteria for judging tests, standardization and reliability, and validity and principles of test development and construction.

PSYC 644. Individual Tests of Intelligence. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in clinical or counseling psychology or permission of counseling or clinical psychology program. Examines the administration, scoring, interpretation and research foundations of the major individual tests of intelligence. Emphasizes the Wechsler scales and the measurement of adult and child intelligence. Develops psychological report writing skills.

PSYC 645. Assessment of Personality. 2,3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 2 or 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in clinical or counseling psychology, or permission of clinical or counseling psychology program and instructor. Examines use of objective and projective tests in assessment of personality. Emphasizes clinical interpretation of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), and the administration and clinical interpretation of the Rorschach and Thematic Apperception Test (TAT). Stresses integrative report writing.

PSYC 646. Projective Techniques. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in clinical or counseling psychology or permission of counseling and clinical program committee. Projective devices for the assessment of personality. Supervised administration, scoring, interpretation and written reports of individually administered projective personality tests.

PSYC 647. Neuropsychological Assessment. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology and permission of instructor. Psychological assessment of brain-behavior relationships in the context of neurological or neurosurgical problems. Emphasis is on current modifications of Halstead's tests and on the Reitan-Indiana Neuropsychological Battery for younger children. Laboratory requires supervised administration, scoring and interpretations of neuropsychological test batteries.

PSYC 648. Behavioral Assessment of Clinical Problems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology and permission of instructor. Development, evaluation, use and interpretation of behavioral approaches to the assessment of clinical problems, including self-monitoring, behavioral ratings and direct observational assessment procedures. Both existing instruments and procedures for designing new instruments will be discussed.

PSYC 649. Clinical Assessment of Child Disorders. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PSYC 643 and graduate standing in clinical psychology, or permission of clinical program committee and instructor. Administration and interpretation of intellectual and personality assessment instruments for children. Laboratory requires supervised administration, scoring, interpretation and written reports of these assessment instruments.

PSYC 650. Advanced Child Psychopathology. 1,3 Hour.

Semester course; variable hours. 1 or 3 credits. May be taken only one time for credit toward degree. Principal childhood behavioral abnormalities: mental retardation, psychosis, learning disabilities, speech and language problems, school-related behavioral problems, neurosis, psychosomatic disorders and juvenile delinquency. Genetic, prenatal, perinatal, postnatal and social-psychological factors related to etiology. Integration of assessment and treatment methods.

PSYC 651. Theories of Counseling and Interviewing. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1, 2 or 3 credits. Prerequisites: graduate standing in counseling or clinical psychology, and permission of instructor. Introduces basic principles of interviewing as they apply to theories and practice of psychotherapy and counseling. Laboratory requires videotaping of simulated counseling/psychotherapy session, modeled and role-played interviewing situation, skill development and demonstration, and evaluative interpersonal feedback.

PSYC 652. Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology and permission of the instructor. Presents the major approaches to psychological interventions for children's and adolescents' behavioral and emotional disorders. Includes a review of empirical research evaluating the effectiveness of contemporary psychological interventions for specific disorders.

PSYC 653. Family Counseling and Therapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PSYC 616, and PSYC 693 or PSYC 694, and PSYC 645; or permission of instructor. Emphasizes an applied approach to family assessment and therapy. Presents theories and concepts of major approaches to family therapy and general systems issues. Emphasizes techniques of family therapy. Involves participants in role playing, demonstration, films and case discussion.

PSYC 654. Marriage Counseling and Therapy: Theory, Practice and Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in clinical or counseling psychology, or permission of instructor. Surveys major theories of marital interaction and counseling (as distinct from family counseling). Students perform assessment batteries and interviews and practice selected techniques of marital counseling. Participation in a research project, either library, field, or experimental research, is required.

PSYC 655. Community Interventions: Development, Implementation and Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Provides an understanding of the concepts community, prevention and promotion and how interventions that adopt such a perspective differ from traditional psychotherapeutic interventions in their goals and targets. Explores how to critically evaluate research related to community and preventive interventions. Emphasizes consideration of issues in designing, implementing and evaluating community intervention projects. Provides opportunities to conduct part of the intervention in a community setting.

PSYC 656. Structured Training Groups. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. This course presents an introduction to the historical roots and basic assumptions of group training methods. The specific focus is on those structured, behavioral interventions that are designed to be time limited and emphasize staff development or training needs of clients. Needs assessment, screening, program development and evaluation, consultation methods and ethics are included as topics. Leadership styles and the composition of training grant proposals are developed and critiqued in the laboratory/experiential component of this course.

PSYC 657. Advanced Educational Psychology for Secondary Teachers. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Application of the principles of psychology to the teaching-learning process in the secondary classroom. Discussion will focus on the comprehensive development of individual learning experiences and educational programs from the point of view of the educator and administrator. Crosslisted as: EDUS 617.

PSYC 659. Seminar in Consultation Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology or permission of instructor. Explores theory and practice of psychological consultation using case materials, readings and individualized projects. Covers conceptual models and role choices available to the consulting psychologist, common phases, principles and practices found in the consultation process and program evaluation and consultation research methods and issues.

PSYC 660. Health Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PSYC 629 and graduate standing in psychology, or permission of instructor. Provides an overview of research in and applications of the principles of behavioral psychology with respect to the fields of medicine, health maintenance and illness. Emphasizes the integration of theoretical research and applied issues in these areas. Surveys major topics in behavioral medicine, including psychophysiological disorders, compliance and adherence with health care regimens, psychological adjustment to illness and pain, behavioral dentistry, pediatric psychology, cardiovascular risk reduction, eating and sleeping disorders, behavioral pharmacology and biofeedback. Explores roles of psychologists.

PSYC 661. Clinical Applications of Health Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Clinical health psychology has emerged as a distinct practice area within professional psychology. It is best defined as the application of psychological assessment and intervention methods to various specialty areas within medicine. These areas include rehabilitation medicine, neurology, geriatrics, transplant medicine, bariatrics, oncology, cardiology, pain management, sleep medicine, reproductive health, pediatrics, gastroenterology and primary care. The course will survey the clinical roles of and intervention and assessment tools used within each of these specialty areas, and will include guest lectures provided by clinicians who work in these specialty areas from the VCU Health System or the larger community. In addition, students will conduct information-gathering telephone interviews with clinicians from around the nation and present their findings in a discussion format. Course evaluation will be based primarily on class discussion, student presentations of interviews and two take-home exams.

PSYC 662. Diagnostic and Behavioral Assessment. 2,3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 2 or 3 credits. Designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of diagnostic and behavioral assessment. The course primarily focuses on the conceptual underpinnings and major methods associated with the diagnostic and behavioral assessment traditions. Emphasis is placed on how these assessment traditions can be used together to guide case conceptualization, monitor treatment progress and outcome, treatment planning, and treatment selection. The course covers psychometric theory, classics assessment controversies and the psychometric strengths and weaknesses of the diagnostic and behavioral assessment approaches. The course ends with a review of risk assessment. The goal of the course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to critically apply the appropriate assessment strategies to guide clinical work from intake to termination.

PSYC 664. Psychological Needs of Military Service Members and Their Families. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Provides opportunities to understand the psychological needs of both service members and their families -- from pre-deployment through post-deployment -- through presentations by professionals from the Department of Defense, National Guard, VA Medical Center and other military organizations. Explores the impact of psychological trauma and physical injuries on service members' well-being. Emphasizes a review of different interventions and other sources of help available for returning service members and their families. Provides an opportunity to prepare an integrative review of a topic related to a military issue.

PSYC 665. Psychodynamic Approaches to Psychological Treatment. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Examines basic principles in conceptualizing and treating clients from a psychodynamic perspective. Theoretical and clinical readings and case materials are used as a basis for an in-depth analysis of psychodynamic theories and practices within a seminar format.

PSYC 666. Crisis Intervention: Theory, Research and Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology or permission of instructor. Review of the development of the concept of psychological crisis and of intervention programs in a range of areas such as sexual assault, natural disasters, telephone hotlines and medical emergencies. Relevant theory and data from community psychology, laboratory and applied research, sociology and psychiatry will be considered.

PSYC 667. Behavior Therapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in the psychology program or permission of instructor. Emphasizes group and individual approaches to the following general areas: observational techniques; counterconditioning and extinction procedures; techniques of positive and negative control; self-control procedures; use of modeling and role playing as change techniques; behavioral feedback and cueing procedures.

PSYC 668. Interpersonal Psychotherapy: Social Psychological Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Analysis of counseling and psychotherapy as interpersonal influence processes. Applications of social psychological theories and research to the process of therapeutic change; identification of key aspects of the change process and of how these aspects are embodied in current approaches and techniques of counseling and psychotherapy. Emphasis on experimental methods of studying change processes.

PSYC 669. Interpersonal Psychotherapy: Communication Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Theory and research in nonverbal communication. Communication theories of psychotherapy and a communication analysis of key concepts in psychotherapy.

PSYC 670. Seminar in Gestalt Therapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Philosophical basis, historical background, theoretical formulation, techniques and application of Gestalt therapy. Students will have the opportunity to practice and observe the techniques.

PSYC 671. Readings and Research. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisite: written permission of instructor. Individual study leading to the investigation of a particular problem in a systematic fashion under the supervision of a member of the faculty.

PSYC 675. Ethical Principles of Psychology. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. A discussion of some of the current problems of interest to psychologists. Particular emphasis on the ethical principles of psychology, and the dilemmas encountered in the teaching, research and applied practice of psychology.

PSYC 676. Personal Awareness in Multicultural Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 seminar hours and 1 hour skills-building component. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in the counseling psychology doctoral program or permission of the instructor. Focus on (1) self-awareness regarding cultural issues, (2) knowledge of cultural differences and (3) counseling skills with culturally different clients. This course will provide the theoretical and research knowledge base to complement students' experiential training in multicultural issues. Building on the students' knowledge of Western and non-Western psychology theories and practices, the course will help students in developing a theory of cross-cultural and multicultural counseling. The course will further focus on historical development of multiculturalism and examine existing research in this area.

PSYC 677. Minority Issues in Mental Health. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology or permission of instructor. Presents an overview of issues pertaining to the mental health of visual racial/ethnic groups (VREG) in the United States (i.e., African-Americans, Hispanics, Asian-Americans and Native Americans). Topic areas include research and psychological theories, assessment, diagnosis, ethnic identity acculturation, service utilization, the family, psychotherapy and training issues.

PSYC 679. Culture, Ethnicity and Health. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Enrollment restricted to graduate students in health psychology or by permission of instructor. This course is designed to provide students with a foundation for understanding and addressing health disparities from a psychological perspective. The class will focus on: (a) health disparities from a historical, political, economic, social and environmental perspective; (b) the intersection of race, ethnicity, gender, socio-economic status, sexual orientation and other social factors that may exacerbate disparities; (c) challenges in the measurement of minority health and health disparities; (d) the role of cultural competence in health promotion and disease prevention; and (e) barriers to health care that contribute to disparities.

PSYC 680. Statistics in Psychological Research I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: an undergraduate psychological statistics course or equivalent within the past three years or successful passage (80 percent or greater) of an undergraduate psychological statistics equivalency test to be completed at VCU. Extensive coverage of multiple regression/correlation analysis with applications in psychology. Survey of applications of multivariate statistical analyses in psychology.

PSYC 681. Statistics in Psychological Research II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 680 or permission of instructor. Will build on PSYC 680 and provide extensive coverage of multiple regression/correlation analysis with applications in psychology. Will provide a survey of applications of multivariate statistical analyses in psychology and will introduce students to recent statistical develpments in the field.

PSYC 688. The Self and Identity. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PSYC 630 and 680 or permission of instructor. Our sense of self provides meaning and coherence to our lives; it is the lens through which we interpret the world. This seminar will take a research-based approach, and almost all readings will be psychology journal articles. Class will focus on key topics in recent self research (e.g., self-regulation, self-esteem, the self and relationships, different cultural conceptions of self) as well as debate controversial issues in the literature (e.g., the cultural universality of self-enhancement, whether positive illusions are healthy). Students may choose some of the topics covered in the latter part of the semester. Evaluation will be based primarily on class discussion, student-led debates and discussions, and a research proposal and presentation at the end of the semester.

PSYC 690. Research Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 4 hours per credit. 1-3 credits. Available to graduate students in the psychology department with approval by their program committee. Provides the graduate student in psychology the opportunity to design and apply research skills under close faculty supervision. Involves research projects that progressively become more sophisticated as students increase their research skills.

PSYC 691. Special Topics. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Theory, research and techniques in specialized topics of current interest are presented.

PSYC 693. Counseling Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; one-half day per credit. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Available only to graduate students in counseling psychology approved by the counseling program committee. A series of training experiences designed to facilitate progressively greater degrees of skill development in counseling psychology.

PSYC 694. Clinical Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; one-half day per credit. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Available only to graduate students in clinical psychology approved by the clinical program committee. The graduate student in clinical psychology is given an opportunity to apply and practice interviews and diagnostic and therapeutic skills with clients requiring psychological services. Careful supervision and evaluation of the student is provided. The practicum may be located at a clinic on campus or in a hospital or other agency off campus.

PSYC 695. Practicum in Clinical or Counseling Supervision. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 4 supervisory hours. 2 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Credits earned do not count as course credits toward the degree. Prerequisites: permission of instructor, enrollment in graduate program in clinical or counseling psychology, completion of 12 hours of clinical (PSYC 694) or counseling (PSYC 693) practicum. This course is an opportunity to develop, apply and practice psychotherapy supervision skills under the direct supervision of clinical or counseling faculty members.

PSYC 696. Internship. 0.5 Hours.

0.5 credit. Prerequisite: approval of the director of the program involved. The internship is one-year, full-time assignment, under supervision, to an agency approved by the student's program committee. Graded S/U/F.

PSYC 700. Grant Writing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: two graduate courses in statistics or permission of instructor. Students are expected to enter course with a pre-approved topic identified and substantial background reading completed. Focuses on preparing an NIH grant application, using F31-F32 mechanism (predoctoral or postdoctoral National Research Service Award) as a model. Course covers elements of a grant application, details of the grant review process and key features of successful applications. Students prepare a research plan for their own application based upon their current work.

PSYC 702. Causal Analysis for Organizational Studies. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: two graduate courses in statistics or permission of instructor. Focuses on conceptual and statistical issues involved with causal analysis with nonexperimental and experimental data. Course covers basic and advanced confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation techniques, with an emphasis on organizational and psychological applications. Crosslisted as: MGMT 702.

PSYC 795. Practicum in the Teaching of College Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. May be repeated. Prerequisites: appointment as a graduate teaching assistant in psychology or permission of instructor. Students develop skills in the design and conduct of undergraduate courses in psychology through observation and supervised experiences: acquaints students with university, college, and department policies and resources in support of instruction; familiarizes students with disciplinary resources; assists students in evaluating personal strengths and weaknesses.

PSYC 798. M.S. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

1-6 credits. May be repeated.

PSYC 898. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

1-12 credits. May be repeated.