SLWK 200. Building a Just Society. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Course will introduce students to social justice issues in a local context with a focus on expanding and deepening their knowledge and skills to effect change through active engagement in the community. Course promotes an understanding and critical analysis of multiple forms of oppression in social systems and in personal experience using professional social work perspectives and theoretical frameworks. Selected reference materials and experiential learning activities are designed to enhance student understanding of what constitutes a just community and a just society. The course may be offered as service-learning.

SLWK 201. Introduction to Social Work. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Systematic overview of the social work profession. Knowledge of the nature of social work, the fields of social work practice, target populations, overview of social work methods.

SLWK 230. Communication in the Helping Process. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The study of the knowledge, skills and values of effective human communication and interpersonal relations. Includes observation, collection and description of data, verbal and nonverbal communication and the relevance of the above to social work practice. Integrates issues of human diversity in all course content. Emphasizes the demonstration and practice of communication through structured exercises.

SLWK 311. Social Work and Oppressed Groups. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Open only to majors or minors in social welfare with junior status or by permission of program director or course instructor. Examines forces leading to individual prejudice and institutional oppression. Focuses on impact of oppression. Provides students with an understanding of diversity and a general knowledge of social work strategies to alleviate oppression and to empower the oppressed.

SLWK 313. Person in Society I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ANTH/INTL 103; BIOL 101, BIOL 151 or BIOL 152; PSYC 304; and SOCY 101. Open only to majors or minors in social welfare with junior status or by permission of program director or course instructor. First of a three-semester sequence on human behavior and the social environment. Uses theoretical concepts and research findings from the behavioral sciences as background for understanding and assessing the functioning of individuals and families in their social environment. Facilitates integration of theory and research with assessment skills associated with basic social work practice. Emphasizes the social systems approach for analyzing the impact of various social problems on individual and family dynamics.

SLWK 330. Person in Society II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SLWK 313 with a minimum grade of C. Open only to majors or minors in social welfare with junior status or by permission of program director or course instructor. Second of three courses on human behavior in the social environment. Uses theoretical concepts from the behavioral sciences to understand the family and small groups as social institutions and social groups as context for human behavior over the life cycle. Designed to provide a theoretical foundation for practice with families and small groups.

SLWK 332. Social Work Practice: Fundamentals. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SLWK 313 with a minimum grade of C. Corequisite: SLWK 393. Open only to social work majors with junior status. First of three semester practice sequence. Introduces students to basic concepts and skills of beginning-level professional generalist social work practice. Emphasizes application of concepts to the concurrent fieldwork experience.

SLWK 380. Foundations of Social Work Research I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Open only to majors or minors in social welfare with junior status or by permission of program director or course instructor. First of two semester research sequence. Designed to provide an understanding and appreciation of a scientific, analytic approach to building knowledge for practice and for evaluating multilevel service delivery. Provides an overview of the research process, including problem formulation, sampling, design, measurement, data collection, data analysis and dissemination of findings. Presents ethical standards of scientific inquiry with special attention to research with vulnerable and oppressed populations.

SLWK 381. Foundations of Social Work Research II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SLWK 380 with a minimum grade of C. Open only to social work majors or minors in social welfare with junior status or by permission of program director or course instructor. The content includes a review of basic statistical univariate and bivariate descriptive and inferential tools for analyzing, interpreting and presenting data for decision-making in generalist social work practice. It also introduces methods for analysis of quantitative and qualitative data and further develops critical-thinking skills in translating empirical research findings into generalist social work practice principles.

SLWK 391. Topics in Social Work. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits. An in-depth study of a selected topic relevant for professional social work practice. See the Schedule of Classes for the specific topic to be offered each semester.

SLWK 393. Junior Field Instruction. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisite: SLWK 313 with a minimum grade of C. Corequisite: SLWK 332. Open only to majors with junior status. Fourteen hours per week (spring semester) or 20 hours per week (summer session) in a community agency under the supervision of an agency-based field instructor. Intended to facilitate student's understanding of agency structure and community context, ability to engage in professional relationships, to assess strengths, define problems, set goals and utilize beginning-level practice skills with individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. Promotes identification as a professional social worker.

SLWK 422. Social Welfare Legislation and Services. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: completion of SLWK 311, 313, 332, 380, 381 and 393, each with a minimum grade of C. Enrollment restricted to majors or minors in social welfare with junior status or by permission of program director or course instructor. Analyzes social welfare policy as related to social values, social problems and social structures. Examines frameworks for policy analysis and for evaluation of programmatic outcomes of policy, with application to contemporary social service and income maintenance policies and delivery systems. Considers the economic, political and ideological factors and processes that affect social welfare legislation, financing and implementation.

SLWK 431. Person in Society III. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SLWK 313 with a minimum grade of C. Open only to majors or minors in social welfare with junior status or by permission of program director or course instructor. Third of three courses on human behavior in the social environment. Builds on the theoretical concepts from the behavioral sciences discussed in SLWK 230 and 313. Focus on understanding organizations and how their purposes, auspices, structure, processes and environment affect the delivery of social services to diverse groups. The community context of social services, including that of the consumer, is emphasized from an open systems theoretical perspective. Students will be expected to integrate course content with their field experience or other agency with which they are familiar. Required of all undergraduate social work majors.

SLWK 441. Social Work Practice I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: SLWK 332, 381 and 393, each with a minimum grade of C. Open only to majors with senior standing. Second of a three-semester practice sequence. Review of interviewing and problem-solving for generalist social work practice with diverse populations. Emphasis on agency structure and function, skills of engagement and problem definition, assessment, planning for intervention, and evaluation. Use of material from concurrent fieldwork practice to facilitate integration of learning.

SLWK 442. Social Work Practice II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: SLWK 441 and SLWK 494, each with a minimum grade of C. Open only to majors with senior standing. Third of a three-semester practice sequence. Emphasizes planning and implementing change with diverse populations, professional ethics, professional development, termination and evaluation of generalist social work practice. Use of case material from concurrent fieldwork practice to facilitate integration of learning.

SLWK 492. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1, 2 or 3 lecture hours. 1, 2 or 3 credits. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. Under supervision of a faculty adviser, whose consent is required to register, study of a topic of concern to the student. Each student must present his or her findings in writing or pass an oral examination.

SLWK 494. Senior Field Instruction I. 3 Hours.

Semester course. 3 credits. Prerequisite: completion of SLWK 332, 381 and 393, each with a minimum grade of C. Corequisite: SLWK 441. Open only to majors with senior status. Fourteen hours per week in a community agency under the supervision of an agency-based field instructor. Intended to develop knowledge, values and social work practice skills appropriate to entry-level generalist practice in human service agencies.

SLWK 495. Senior Field Instruction II. 3 Hours.

Semester course. 3 credits. Prerequisite: completion of SLWK 494 with a minimum grade of C. Corequisite: SLWK 442. Open only to majors with senior status. Fourteen hours per week in a community agency under the supervision of an agency-based field instructor. Intended to develop knowledge, values and social work practice skills appropriate to entry-level generalist practice in human service agencies.

SLWK 499. Senior Seminar. 1 Hour.

Semester course. 1 credit. Corequisites: SLWK 442 and 495. Typically to be taken in the last semester of the student's senior year. This course serves as an academic culmination of the undergraduate social work program. The student will compile a portfolio of B.S.W. program academic materials, complete a professional self-assessment and resume and participate in the development of a comprehensive generalist intervention plan with regard to a specified social problem.

SLWK 601. Human Behavior in the Social Environment I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Provides a multidimensional theoretical and evidence-based approach to understanding the complex interactions of biological, psychological, spiritual, economic, political and sociocultural forces on the lives individuals, families and groups in a multicultural society. Required core curriculum course.

SLWK 602. Policy, Community and Organizational Practice I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Corequisite: SLWK 601. First of two foundation courses on social policy, policy practice and practice in communities and organizations. Surveys historical evolution of social welfare policy and contemporary provision of social welfare services, including the role of values in policy formulation and principles of social and economic justice. Introduces the social work role as change agent in legislative, community and organizational arenas. Uses social/behavioral knowledge and social work intervention models and applies analytical frameworks for assessing program, organizational and policy effectiveness. Develops skills in identification of need, designing strategies for change and policy analysis.

SLWK 603. Social Work and Social Justice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Enhances understanding of and appreciation for diversity in self and others. Addresses issues of power, inequality, privilege and resulting oppression. Analyzes oppression resulting from persistent social, educational, political, religious, economic and legal inequalities. Focuses on the experiences of oppressed groups in the U.S. in order to understand their strengths, needs and responses. Uses a social justice perspective for the study of and practice with oppressed groups. Required direct practice core curriculum course.

SLWK 604. Social Work Practice with Individuals, Families and Groups I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Pre- or corequisites: SLWK 601, 602, 603. Introduces basic knowledge, skills and values necessary to provide a range of restorative, rehabilitative, maintenance and enhancement services in social work practice with individuals, families and groups. Introduces selected practice theories and models to guide intervention. Emphasizes the multidimensional and diverse contexts in which problems and needs are assessed and in which intervention occurs. Required direct practice core curriculum course.

SLWK 605. Social Work Practice with Individuals, Families and Groups II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisite: SLWK 604. Pre- or corequisites: SLWK 606 and SLWK 610. Extends application of beginning knowledge and skills to the phases of intervention with groups and families. Presents knowledge and skills of environmental intervention and termination. Introduces additional selected theories and models for social work practice with individuals, families and groups with attention to special populations and practice evaluation. Required direct practice core curriculum course.

SLWK 606. Policy, Community and Organizational Practice II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SLWK 602. The second of two foundation courses on social policy, policy practice and practice in communities and organizations. Examines values and ethical dilemmas facing professional social workers in organizations, communities and policy-making arenas. Explores legislative/political processes. Develops skills in legislative lobbying, advocacy, design of change strategies and tactics, policy analysis and task group leadership. Emphasizes reciprocal effects of policy on social work practice and implications for social and economic justice.

SLWK 607. Social Work Practice with Individuals, Families and Groups for Advanced-standing Students. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisite: admission to the advanced standing program. Corequisites: SLWK 608, 611 and 612. Students review approaches, principles, techniques and theories of micro social work practice and human behavior. Emphasis is on commonalties and differences among practice modalities, including differential assessment, intervention and evaluation of outcomes. Course includes weekly field instruction integrating seminar. This course is offered during the summer only. Required advanced standing program core curriculum course.

SLWK 608. Social Work Practice in Organizations and Communities for Advanced-standing Students. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: admission to the Advanced Standing Program. Corequisites: SLWK 607, 611 and 612. Presents social work theory and practice focusing on social policy, communities, agencies and interventions in light of principles of social and economic justice. Introduces and analyzes the social work role of policy practitioner with its specific skills and tasks. Demonstrates the importance of understanding the community and the agency in social work practice. Provides skill building in advocacy, planned change, and policy and organizational analysis, as well as weekly field instruction seminar. This course is offered during the summer only.

SLWK 609. Foundations of Research in Social Work Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Introduces the methods of social work research, including problem formulation, research designs, measurement, data collection and sampling. Focuses on the application of critical-thinking skills, diversity and research methods of clinical social work practice effectiveness. Covers evaluation of social work programs and services. Required direct practice core curriculum course.

SLWK 610. Human Behavior in the Social Environment II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisite: SLWK 601. Covers the life course from conception through late adulthood and/or death. Focuses on the influences of biological, psychological, spiritual, economic, political and sociocultural forces on individual and family coping and adaptation. Provides a multidimensional, multicultural perspective on the behavior of individuals and families based on theory and research with identification of the risk and protective mechanisms that influence development. Required core curriculum course.

SLWK 611. Social Work Research for Advanced-standing Students. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisite: admission to the advanced standing program. Corequisites: SLWK 607, 608 and 612. Reviews approaches to scientific inquiry in the development of knowledge for social work practice; problem formulation; concepts and operational definitions; measurement validity and reliability; selected social work research designs; planned data collection strategies and procedures. Required advanced standing program core curriculum course.

SLWK 612. Advanced-standing Field Instruction. 3 Hours.

Summer course; four eight-hour days in field instruction, followed by two days per week for nine weeks and completed with a full five-day week at the field instruction agency. 3 credits. Prerequisites: admission to the Advanced Standing Program. Corequisites: SLWK 607, 608 and 611. Reviews foundation-level knowledge, attitudes and skills acquired through social work education at the undergraduate level. Requires application, refinement and the active use of content from the advanced standing curriculum in supervised social work practice in a social agency. Graded P/F. Grade of P required to continue in the program.

SLWK 692. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1-6 credits. Maybe be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: M.S.W. foundation standing and permission of instructor and M.S.W. program director. The student will be required to submit a proposal for study in an identified practice area or for exploration of a specific problem in social work not ordinarily included in the Master of Social Work curriculum. The results of the student’s study will be presented in a format determined by the instructor and student to be most effective for assessing study educational objectives/competencies and outcomes. A maximum of four independent study courses may be included in a student’s educational program.

SLWK 693. Foundation Field Instruction I. 3 Hours.

Continuous course; two days/14 hours per week. 3 credits. Pre- or corequisite: SLWK 604. Provides opportunities to master essential social work knowledge, values and skills through practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor, monitored by a faculty field liaison. Emphasizes integration of content from all areas of the foundation curriculum. Grade of PR required for continuation from SLWK 693 to SLWK 694; converts to P upon completion of SLWK 694.

SLWK 694. Foundation Field Instruction II. 3 Hours.

Continuous course; two days/14 hours per week. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SLWK 693. Provides opportunities to master essential social work knowledge, values and skills through practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor, monitored by a faculty field liaison. Emphasizes integration of content from all areas of the foundation curriculum. Graded P/F. Final grade of P required to continue in the program.

SLWK 695. Block Foundation Field Instruction. 6 Hours.

Semester course; five days a week for one semester. 6 credits. Prerequisites: SLWK 605. Option for part-time students only. Provides opportunities to master essential social work knowledge, values and skills through practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor, monitored by a faculty field liaison. Emphasizes the integration of content from all areas of the foundation curriculum. Graded P/F. Grade of P required to continue in the program.

SLWK 703. Mental, Emotional and Behavioral Disorders. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. This course reviews the epidemiology, etiology, classification (using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders V) and course of a range of mental, emotional and behavioral disorders and conditions across the life span and the relevance of this knowledge to social work across practice settings. It emphasizes a biopsychosocialspiritual assessment, a risk and protective factors framework, a critical analysis of existing and emerging theory, the impact of difference and diversity, an appreciation of the lived experience of these challenges for clients and their families, and the practical implications of this knowledge for relationship-building and treatment planning as well as interdisciplinary collaboration. Introduces knowledge of psychopharmacology. Required advanced clinical core curriculum course.

SLWK 704. Clinical Social Work Practice I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Pre- or corequisites: SLWK 703 and 706. Provides a multitheoretical orientation to intervention across fields of practice with individuals, families, couples and groups. Emphasizes contemporary psychodynamic and cognitive behavioral approaches and their empirical support. Focuses on multidimensional assessment and the differential application of therapeutic, supportive, educational and resource-management strategies to complex problems of children, youth and adults. Required advanced clinical core curriculum course.

SLWK 705. Clinical Social Work Practice II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SLWK 704; pre- or co-requisites: SLWK 707 and 710. Continues a multitheoretical orientation to intervention across fields of practice with emphasis on integrated family systems theory and multidimensional family assessment. Focuses on differential application of psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral and family systems theories to a range of complex client problems and concerns with attention to diverse populations. Introduces basic knowledge of pharmacology related to social work intervention. Required advanced clinical core curriculum course.

SLWK 706. Research for Clinical Social Work Practice I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. Review of statistical inference and decision-making using univariate and bivariate techniques. Introduction to computer applications for quantitative data and methods of analysis of qualitative data. Application of ethical standards for research involving human participants. Further development of critical-thinking skills in using empirical literature. Required advanced clinical core curriculum course.

SLWK 707. Research for Clinical Social Work Practice II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SLWK 706. Further development of critical-thinking skills for translating research findings into practice principles and measuring outcomes of clinical practice. Focus on data collection, data analysis, presentation of visual and statistical techniques for qualitative and quantitative research methods, and utilization of findings for improving clinical social work practice. Continued application of statistical inference, integration of empirical research findings and decision-making. Required advanced clinical core curriculum course.

SLWK 710. Concentration Social Policy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. Focuses on advanced policy analysis through an in-depth, focused examination of a particular social policy area or population. Extends basic knowledge and skills of policy formulation, development and impact analysis/evaluation, as these affect practice on behalf of clients. Examines diversity of policy sources; value, political and economic determinants; policy formulation processes; the policy basis for current services; a broad range of potential need domains; and current programs and laws. Integrates knowledge of human behavior and the social environment relevant to the focal policy areas and pays special attention to issues of social and economic justice. Examines current policy issues, advocacy efforts related to these issues and practice strategies for effecting change.

SLWK 711. Strategies for Social Work Planning and Administrative Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 694; or SLWK 612. Develops leadership and planning skills that guide the implementation of policy and practice in community and organizational settings. Present problem-solving strategies for planning, administration and management of community and organizational resources. Emphasizes planning context for diverse settings. Provides knowledge and skill for human and fiscal resource responsibilities, including fund raising. Examines ethical and justice implications of planning and administrative practice.

SLWK 712. Social Work Planning and Administrative Practice I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Pre- or co-requisites: SLWK 711 and SLWK 714. Presents knowledge and skills for social work leadership in administering, developing and advocating social service policies and programs that are socially and economically just. Examines underlying assumptions, political, value and ethical considerations in social service planning. Presents knowledge of organizational theories and analyzes the political context of problem solving in the internal and external environments of organizations and programs. Focuses on community and organizational planning theories and models of intervention in assessing needs, analyzing problems, determining feasibility and identifying emergent dilemmas. Emphasizes development of critical thinking and self-awareness about role responsibilities and ethical positions for organizational and community leadership at local, state, national and international levels.

SLWK 713. Social Work Planning and Administrative Practice II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SLWK 712. Continues development of knowledge and skills begun in SLWK 712. Examines traditional and alternative strategies in formulating proposals to address human needs. Emphasizes multiple program designs (e.g., direct service, advocacy, staff development and training, and community empowerment programs). Incorporates understandings of policies, community, and organizational behavior and change, and leadership styles and skills. Analyzes feasibility of interorganizational partnerships and community relationships. Focuses on financial and human resource acquisition and mobilization, monitoring, accountability and evaluation.

SLWK 714. Research for Social Work Administration, Planning and Policy Practice I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. Focuses on social work program and service evaluation including needs assessment, social indicators analysis, evidence-based practices, formative and summative evaluation designs using multiple method data collection and participatory approaches. Review of statistical inference and decision-making, introduction to computer applications for quantitative data and methods for analysis of qualitative data. Application of ethical standards for evaluation involving human participants.

SLWK 715. Research for Social Work Administration, Planning and Policy Practice II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SLWK 714. Focuses on evaluation of social work programs and services including data collection, data analysis, presentation of visual and statistical techniques for qualitative and quantitative evaluation methods, and dissemination of evaluation findings. Continues review of statistical inference and decision-making. Emphasizes integrating evaluation findings into a knowledge base for social work administration, planning and policy practice using participatory approaches with stakeholders.

SLWK 716. Concentration Social Policy for Social Work Administration, Planning and Policy Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. Extends SLWK 602 through 606 content on policy practice, organizations, communities and advocacy. Critically analyzes traditional and alternative theories and models of the policy-making process. Demonstrates how the policy process is the core principle for decision-making in agencies, communities and legislatures. Develops advanced skills in policy analysis, policy formulation and place practice including advocacy. Emphasizes the relationship and impact of economic policies on clients, communities and agencies in light of principles of social and economic justice. Analyzes current regulatory and agency policies and their implications for policy practice/advocacy for effecting change.

SLWK 717. Social Work Practice in the School Setting. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. Emphasizes knowledge and skills of school social work practice with diverse populations in urban and rural school settings. Uses an ecological explanatory theoretical perspective to conceptualize the interdependence of school, family and community as complex interdependent systems that guide evidence-based practice interventions. Integrates a strengths-based social justice perspective for school-based concerns related to violence, racism, sexism, poverty and their impact on children and youth in educational settings. Advanced clinical elective and core curriculum course for school social work practice certification.

SLWK 718. Social Work Practice in Child Welfare. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisite: foundation curriculum or permission of the instructor and M.S.W. program director. Identifies the major social, demographic and economic changes in child welfare services that impact children -- a vulnerable population -- and their families. Builds on explanatory theories and related skill sets required for effective service delivery. Primary service areas are intervention, family preservation, child protection and permanency planning. Advanced clinical elective course.

SLWK 719. Gender and Substance Abuse: Social Work Practice Issues. 3 Hours.

Semester course; content delivered online. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. Based on the social work person-in-environment explanatory multitheoretical perspective and current research to provide a multidimensional understanding of the influence of gender roles and biological sex in vulnerability to substance abuse and related problems. Evidence-based theory approaches are utilized to identify and address the effects of substance abuse and related problems for men, women and children. Advanced clinical elective course.

SLWK 726. Social Work Practice and Health Care. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. Focuses on social work practice in a variety of health care settings with a range of explanatory theories conceptualizing health care issues and identifies related interventions from prevention and health promotion to end-of-life care. Explores ethical and legal issues and introduces frameworks for addressing ethical dilemmas. Examines the role of the social worker on an interdisciplinary team. Examines the influence of economics, political decisions, technology, changing demographics and cultural, social and spiritual/religious experiences on individual health care decisions, access to health care and definitions of health and illness. Advanced clinical elective course.

SLWK 727. Trauma and Social Work Practice: Theory, Assessment and Intervention. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. Provides advanced explanatory theoretical knowledge and skills to explain, identify, assess and provide effective and competent evidence-based trauma intervention services to survivors of complex traumatic experiences. Focuses on the evidence-based biopsychosocial consequences of childhood sexual and physical abuse and military/war trauma experiences in daily functioning on individuals, families and groups. Advanced clinical elective course.

SLWK 728. The Interdisciplinary Team in Social Work Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. Explores definitions and analyzes interdisciplinary team approaches. Studies the roles and functions of participants on interdisciplinary teams. Emphasizes similarities and differences between social work and other disciplines as members of teams. Explores opportunities for, and obstacles to, effective service delivery by teams.

SLWK 739. Social Work and the Law. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612.Overview of fundamental principles of Anglo-American law; structure and function of the legal system and its professional membership; lawyers and their working relationship with social workers. Emphasizes client-centered problems encountered in the legal community and the role social workers can play in helping clients deal with those encounters. Explores issues relative to client needs such as welfare rights, consumer protection, mental health treatment, family-related law and discrimination relative to education, housing, employment, health care. Discusses legal issues confronting social work, such as confidentiality, licensing, advocacy and witnessing.

SLWK 740. Social Work Crisis Intervention and Planned Short-term Treatment. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. Examines explanatory conceptual and theoretical aspects of the differential use of crisis intervention and planned short-term social work intervention. Explores evidence-based crisis models that guide direct interventions, consultation, collaboration and service-delivery issues. Advanced clinical elective course.

SLWK 741. Social Work Practice and the Neurosciences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. The course introduces the social work student to the increasingly important field of neuroscience and the numerous explanatory theories which underlie this science (e.g. neuroplasticity, epigenetics, neurodevelopmental view of trauma, pharmacogenomics, neurobiology of addiction). Focus is placed on why neuroscience research is important for the discipline of social work and how specific neuroscience findings can be utilized by the social work practitioner to enhance practice interventions. Though the field of neuroscience is extensive, this course will focus on several areas that are of particular relevance to social work practice.

SLWK 742. Core Concepts of Child and Adolescent Trauma. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: SLWK 693 and SLWK 694; or SLWK 695. This course will introduce students to the core concepts (explanatory theory and foundational knowledge) that inform evidence-based assessment and intervention with traumatized children and adolescents. Strength-based practice will be highlighted along with a focus on the identification of protective and promotive factors that foster resiliency and post-traumatic growth. Trauma is broadly defined, and subjects include children and adolescents exposed to traumatic events including, but not limited to natural disasters, war, abuse and neglect, medical trauma, and witnessing interpersonal crime (e.g. domestic violence) and other traumatic events. The course will highlight the role of development, culture and empirical evidence in trauma-specific interventions with children, adolescents and their families. It will address the level of functioning of primary caregiving environments and assess the capacity of the community to facilitate restorative processes.

SLWK 743. Spirituality and Social Work Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; SLWK 695; or SLWK 612.. Designed to educate students for advanced social work practice with persons of diverse religious and nonreligious perspectives of spirituality. It provides a comprehensive introduction to spiritually sensitive social work and is intended to expand the explanatory theories that inform professional social work practice. The concepts of person-in-environment and strengths become vivid as the student in practicum assesses how individuals may use spirituality to establish meaning and purpose in relation to their goals of daily living.

SLWK 745. Social Work Practice in Community Mental Health. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. Provides the specialized knowledge, values and skills requisite in community mental health settings. Builds on the explanatory biopsychosocial model of mental health/illness. Focuses on current evidence-based psychotherapeutic, psychoeducational, and skill-training models and approaches used with individuals, families and groups experiencing or affected by a range of mental health problems. Examines interdisciplinary teamwork, case management, advocacy and medication management roles. Advanced clinical elective course.

SLWK 746. Social Work Practice and Psychopharmacology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. . Reviews the historical, political and ethical context of psychotropic medications in social work practice. Provides an explanatory theoretical overview of psychopharmacology and social work roles and skill sets in medication management for effective collaboration with clients, families and other mental health practitioners on medication-related issues. Advanced clinical elective course.

SLWK 747. Social Work Intervention with Children and Adolescents. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. . Provides students with the opportunity for concentrated study and application of a range of specific explanatory theoretical models and evidence-based intervention strategies with children, adolescents and their families. Special attention is given to multicultural theoretical approaches that guide approaches to providing services to children and adolescents from diverse racial, ethnic, social and sexual orientation backgrounds and diverse settings. Advanced clinical elective course.

SLWK 748. Group Methods in Social Work Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. Presents several conceptual models of therapeutic groups that explain group dynamics and processes, including evidence-based treatment, educational and mutual aid/self-help. Covers agency conditions affecting practice with groups, the planning of new groups, the multiple phases of group process, and related theory-based interventions and techniques of work with groups and group practice evaluation. Advanced clinical elective course.

SLWK 749. Social Work Intervention in Substance Abuse. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. . Provides students with the physiological, emotional and behavioral manifestations of substance abuse, DSM-IV-TR-based assessment, a range of relevant evidence-based intervention strategies and the role of social workers in evaluation and intervention. Covers explanatory theory models that guide substance abuse intervention and presents screening, assessment and interventional techniques. Current research and controversies in the field are also emphasized. Advanced clinical elective course.

SLWK 750. Ethics and Social Work Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. Examines the history and development of the values base and ethical principles of the social work profession. Investigates codes of ethics for professional practice, with special attention to the principles of human relationships, integrity, social justice and competence. Analyzes ethical dilemmas in social work practice. Considers mechanisms for the enforcement of ethical codes.

SLWK 751. Social Work Practice and AIDS. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 694; or SLWK 612. . Focuses on information, knowledge and skills needed to provide social work services to persons with ARC and AIDS and their families. Emphasizes epidemiological material, psychological and psychosocial aspects of AIDS and ARC for understanding the context of social policies and social work intervention. Addresses differential application of social work roles and functions.

SLWK 753. Social Work Practice with Oppressed Racial and Ethnic Groups. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. Focuses on enhancing the student’s micro and macro social work interventions with oppressed racial and ethnic groups. Addresses the social and economic context in which social work practice occurs. Examines history, ethics, values, attitudes and behaviors of the student and the profession as they relate to assessment and intervention with oppressed racial and ethnic groups. Assesses intervention frameworks and techniques for their appropriateness and effectiveness with these groups.

SLWK 755. Social Work Practice in Organizing for Social Change. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. An advanced practice course that recognizes the central role of social action in social work practice, no matter the context, and the value of social justice, no matter what client population. Built on the idea of multiple perspectives and using the Rothman model of organizing, it assumes students already possess basic policy practice and direct practice skills in order to focus on the dimensions of social action and locality development.

SLWK 757. Special Topics in Clinical Social Work Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: SLWK 703 and 704. Provides knowledge and skills for intervention across fields of practice with the use of up to three clinical practice theories or intervention modalities that are not emphasized in required clinical practice courses. Focuses on the differential application of intervention strategies to problems of children, youth and adults. Examines the impact of diversity in clinical practice.

SLWK 759. Art Therapy in Social Work Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. . Focuses on explanatory theory supporting art therapy as an evidence-based approach to clinical social work intervention. Explores the models, principles and techniques of art therapy in social work practice. Examines assessment, intervention, termination and evaluation strategies that supplement traditional social work treatment, including research and specific evidence-based practice strategies for individuals, families, groups and diverse populations.

SLWK 761. Interpersonal Violence. 3 Hours.

Semester course (hybrid course with both in-class and online sessions); 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. Increases understanding of interpersonal violence explanatory theory and practice knowledge for a wide range of client systems throughout the lifespan. Included are prenatal exposure to interpersonal violence, child abuse and neglect, teen dating violence, intimate partner violence, children's experience with intimate partner violence, and elder abuse. Victim and perpetrator experiences related to interpersonal violence will be highlighted. Resiliency and experiences of diverse populations from an evidence-based person-in-environment theoretical perspective are emphasized. Prevention theory strategies and relevant interpersonal violence policy issues are also addressed.

SLWK 765. Supervision. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. . Explores task components and responsibilities in supervision of the social worker. Emphasizes a conceptual framework for supervision, including knowledge base, methods and skill in supervision. Attention to affirmative action programs in social service delivery systems.

SLWK 769. Women's Issues and Social Work Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. . Explores new perspectives on women and their changing roles as these affect social work practice; direct and indirect ways sexist attitudes are acquired and conveyed; effects of changing female roles of human behavior theory and its application, development of new life styles; social work theories and their relevance to today’s world; current women’s issues; and the social worker’s role as counselor and advocate.

SLWK 770. International Social Work Study Abroad. 3 Hours.

Semester course (international study); 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. Examines social work clinical and policy practice, social pedagogy and the social welfare system of another country that includes a field trip to the country. Examines a range of issues pertaining to the country, including: society, culture and history; social work education; the social welfare system; selected social programs; social work clinical and policy practice; and comparisons of these topics between the country and the U.S. Requires completion of several course units before the study abroad program.

SLWK 773. Program Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 or 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. . Presents methods, problems and research findings related to the evaluation of social welfare programs. Examines research design options and methodologies available for program evaluation. Explores organizational and administrative contexts in which evaluation activities are initiated, supported, disseminated and utilized. Presents data processing and the roles of data analysis and the computer in the evaluation of social welfare programs.

SLWK 791. Topical Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course. 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. Presents and analyzes current social work practice theories and/or issues in specialized areas of interest to social work. Advanced clinical curriculum elective course.

SLWK 792. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1-6 lecture hours. 1-6 credits. Prerequisite(s): SLWK 693 and 694; or SLWK 695; or SLWK 612. The student is required to submit a proposal, guided by theory, for investigation in an identified practice area or problem in social work not ordinarily included in the regular M.S.W. curriculum. The topic is proposed by the student; the number of credit hours is determined by the instructor and approved by the M.S.W. program director. The results of the study are presented in a format determined by the instructor and student and approved by the M.S.W. program director. Concentration year elective course.

SLWK 793. Concentration Field Instruction I. 3 Hours.

Continuous course; 21 hours per week. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SLWK 704. First of a two-course sequence that provides opportunities to master advanced social work application of theory knowledge, values and skills through practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor, monitored by a faculty field liaison. Emphasizes integration of content from all areas of the concentration curriculum. Completion of two-course sequence requires 630 structured field hours. Practicum supervisor has LCSW credentials or clinical course of study M.S.W. with three years post-M.S.W. clinical experience. Advanced clinical field instruction.

SLWK 794. Concentration Field Instruction II. 3 Hours.

Continuous course; 21 hours per week. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SLWK 793. Second of a two-course sequence provides opportunities to master advanced social work application of theory knowledge, values and skills through practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor, monitored by a faculty field liaison. Emphasizes integration of content from all areas of the concentration curriculum. Completion of two-course sequence requires 630 structured field hours. Practicum supervisor has LCSW credentials or clinical course of study M.S.W. with three years post-M.S.W. clinical experience. Advanced clinical field instruction.

SLWK 795. Concentration Block Field Instruction. 6 Hours.

Semester fieldwork; five days a week for one semester. 6 credits. Prerequisite: SLWK 705. Advanced clinical block field instruction (option for part-time students). Provides opportunities to master advanced social work knowledge, values and skills through practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor, monitored by a faculty field liaison. Emphasizes integration of content from all areas of the concentration curriculum. Completion of course requires 600 structured field hours. Practicum supervisor has LCSW credentials or clinical course of study M.S.W. with three years post-M.S.W. clinical experience.

SLWK 796. Concentration Field Instruction DE I. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 15 hours per week. 2 credits. Prerequisites: M.S.W. concentration standing; enrollment in the distance education program. Pre- or corequisites: SLWK 703, 704-705, 706-707, 710 and electives; or SLWK 710 , 711, 712-713, 714 -715 and electives; or foundation curriculum; or permission of the instructor and M.S.W. program director. Course provides opportunities to master advanced social work application of theory knowledge, values and skills through practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor and monitored by a faculty field liaison. Emphasizes integration of content from all areas of the concentration curriculum. Completion of course requires 210 structured field hours. Practicum supervisor has LCSW credentials or clinical course of study M.S.W. with three years post-M.S.W. clinical experience. Advanced clinical field instruction.

SLWK 797. Concentration Field Instruction DE II. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 15 hours per week. 2 credits. Prerequisites: M.S.W. concentration standing; enrollment in the distance education program; SLWK 796. Pre- or corequisites: SLWK 703, 704-705, 706-707, 710 and electives; or SLWK 710 , 711, 712-713, 714 -715 and electives; or foundation curriculum; or permission of the instructor and M.S.W. program director. Course provides opportunities to master advanced social work application of theory knowledge, values and skills through practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor and monitored by a faculty field liaison. Emphasizes integration of content from all areas of the concentration curriculum. Completion of course requires 210 structured field hours. Practicum supervisor has LCSW credentials or clinical course of study M.S.W. with three years post-M.S.W. clinical experience. Advanced clinical field instruction.

SLWK 798. Concentration Field Instruction DE III. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 15 hours per week. 2 credits. Prerequisites: M.S.W. concentration standing; enrollment in the distance education program; SLWK 796, SLWK 797. Pre- or corequisites: SLWK 703, 704-705, 706-707, 710 and electives; or SLWK 710 , 711, 712-713, 714 -715 and electives; or foundation curriculum; or permission of the instructor and M.S.W. program director. Course provides opportunities to master advanced social work application of theory knowledge, values and skills through practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor and monitored by a faculty field liaison. Emphasizes integration of content from all areas of the concentration curriculum. Completion of course requires 210 structured field hours. Practicum supervisor has LCSW credentials or clinical course of study M.S.W. with three years post-M.S.W. clinical experience. Advanced clinical field instruction.