College of Humanities and Sciences

Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 551. Anthropology for the Museologist. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A discussion and investigation of contemporary anthropological themes and questions and identification of how they can be depicted with museum materials. Students are expected to develop a research design for an exhibit.

ANTH 556. Historical and Cultural Landscapes. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Open only to seniors who have completed ANTH 302 or 303 and graduate students with permission of instructor. Students will study historical and contemporary landscapes as the products of the producers of human culture, with particular attention to riverine landscapes. Focus will be on the ways in which humans shape and respond to their ecosystems. Students will participate in an active field research program, including the archaeological recovery and analysis of historical landscapes. Crosslisted as: ENVS 556.

Biology (BIOL)

BIOL 502. Microbial Biotechnology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MICR/BIOC 503 or BIOC 530, 531, 532 and 533 or equivalent, and MICR/BIOC 504 or equivalent. Open to qualified seniors and graduate students only. Discussion of the application of basic principles to the solution of commercial problems. The course will cover the historical principles in biotransformations as related to primary and secondary metabolism, as well as recombinant DNA technology and monoclonal antibodies and products resulting from the application of recombinant DNA technology.

BIOL 503. Fish Biology. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 317 or equivalent. Open to qualified seniors and graduate students only. Classification, behavior, physiology and ecology of fishes. Laboratories will emphasize field collection of fish and identification of specimens.

BIOL 507. Aquatic Microbiology. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 4 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisites: BIOL 303 and 307 or equivalents. Open to qualified seniors and graduate students only. This course will involve a practical approach to the methods used to culture, identify and enumerate specific microorganisms that affect the cycling of elements in aquatic systems and those that affect or indicate water quality.

BIOL 508. Barrier Island Ecology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 317 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. A study of the physical factors affecting the formation of barrier islands, adaptations of plants and animals for colonization and persistence in these harsh environments, and how coastal ecological processes conform to general ecological theory. Examples and problems pertaining to Virginia and the southeastern United States are emphasized.

BIOL 509. Microbial Ecology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 317 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. Open only to qualified seniors and graduate students. Explores the interactions of microorganisms and their environment, including discussion of microbial diversity, nutrient cycling, symbiosis and selected aspects of applied microbiology.

BIOL 510. Conservation Biology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Open to qualified seniors and graduate students only. Explores the accelerated loss of species due to increasing human population pressure and the biological, social and legal processes involved in conserving biodiversity.

BIOL 512. Plant Diversity and Evolution. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 4 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisites: BIOL 300 and 310 or equivalents, or permission of instructor. Taxonomy, diversity and evolutionary history of vascular plants (including ferns, gymnosperms and flowering plants). Lecture emphasis on evolutionary relationships; laboratory emphasis on plant recognition and identification, especially of the Virginia flora, including some field trips to areas of local botanical interest.

BIOL 514. Stream Ecology. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 317. Open to qualified seniors and graduate students only. A study of the ecology of streams and rivers. Laboratory emphasis is on the structure and functioning of aquatic communities in mountain to coastal streams.

BIOL 516. Population Genetics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: STAT/BIOS 543. Theoretical and empirical analyses of how demographic and evolutionary processes influence neutral and adaptive genetic variation within populations. Crosslisted as: HGEN 516.

BIOL 518. Plant Ecology. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. One three-day field trip is required. 4 credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 317. Open to qualified seniors and graduate students only. A lecture, field and laboratory course concerned with the development, succession and dynamics of plant communities and their interrelations with climate, soil, biotic and historic factors.

BIOL 520. Population Ecology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: BIOL 310 and BIOL 317 or permission of instructor. Open to qualified seniors and graduate students only. Theoretical and empirical analysis of processes that occur within natural populations, including population genetics, population growth and fluctuation, demography, evolution of life history strategies and interspecific interactions. Quantitative models will be used extensively to explore ecological concepts.

BIOL 521. Community Ecology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: BIOL 317 or equivalent. Open to qualified seniors and graduate students only. Theoretical and empirical analysis of the structure and function of natural communities, ecosystems and landscapes.

BIOL 522. Evolution and Speciation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 310 or equivalent. Open to qualified seniors and graduate students only. Evolutionary principles, with emphasis on genetic and environmental factors leading to changes in large and small populations of plants and animals, and the mechanisms responsible for speciation.

BIOL 524. Endocrinology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: BIOL 300 and CHEM 301-302 and CHEZ 301L, 302L or equivalent. Open to qualified seniors and graduate students only. Hormonal control systems at the organ, tissue and cellular level. Although the major emphasis will be on vertebrate endocrine systems, some discussion of invertebrate and plant control systems will be covered.

BIOL 530. Introduction to Human Genetics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment restricted to qualified seniors and graduate students. Basic knowledge of genetics is recommended. Provides a comprehensive examination of the fundamentals of human genetics. Explores topics including Mendelian and non-Mendelian inheritance, pedigree analysis, cytogenetics, aneuploid syndromes, cancer, gene structure and function, epigenetics, gene expression, biochemical genetics, and inborn errors of metabolism. Crosslisted as: HGEN 501.

BIOL 532. Water Pollution Biology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: BIOL 317 or equivalent and one year of general chemistry. A study of various forms of pollution in aquatic environments, including the basic principles and effects of water pollution on aquatic organisms and ecosystems, ecotoxicology, waterborne pathogens, invasive species, water pollution monitoring and environmental laws.

BIOL 535. Wetlands Ecology. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 317 or equivalent or permission of instructor. A study of the ecology of freshwater and coastal wetlands, including the physical and biological aspects of these systems, wetland functions at local, landscape and global scales, and wetland regulations and restoration. Students will acquire skills with analytical techniques used in laboratory settings and in field-based applications for purposes of identifying and delineating wetland ecosystems.

BIOL 540. Fundamentals of Molecular Genetics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 310 or consent of instructor. The basic principles and methodologies of molecular biology and genetics are applied to genome organization, replication, expression, regulation, mutation and reorganization. Emphasis will be placed on a broad introduction to and integration of important topics in prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. Crosslisted as: BNFO 540.

BIOL 541. Laboratory in Molecular Genetics. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 4 laboratory hours. 2 credits. Pre- or corequisite: BIOL 540 or equivalent. Experiments are designed to apply advanced techniques and concepts of molecular biology and genetics using prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems. Emphasis will be placed on experimental design, integrating results throughout the semester, making use of relevant published literature, scientific writing and providing hands-on experience with advanced equipment and methodologies. Crosslisted as: BNFO 541.

BIOL 545. Biological Complexity. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: physics and calculus, or permission of instructor. Open only to graduate students and qualified seniors. An introduction to the basis of complexity theory and the principles of emergent properties within the context of integrative life sciences. The dynamic interactions among biological, physical and social components of systems are emphasized, ranging from the molecular to ecosystem level. Modeling and simulation methods for investigating biological complexity are illustrated. Crosslisted as: LFSC 510.

BIOL 548. Bioinformatic Technologies. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 545/LFSC 510 or permission of instructor. Introduction to the hardware and software used in computational biology, proteomics, genomics, ecoinformatics and other areas of data analysis in the life sciences. The course also will introduce students to data mining, the use of databases, meta-data analysis and techniques to access information. Crosslisted as: LFSC 520.

BIOL 550. Ecological Genetics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Open to qualified seniors and graduate students only. Introduces the principles of ecological genetics, especially those with foundations in population and quantitative genetics, and illustrates conceptual difficulties encountered by resource stewards who wish to apply genetic principles. Explores various types of biological technologies employed by conservation geneticists and provides means for students to gain experience in analyzing and interpreting ecological genetic data.

BIOL 560. Conservation Medicine. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Introduces students to key elements of wildlife diseases, zoonoses, emerging infectious diseases associated with wildlife and humans, and both the conservation and health impacts of these topics. Included are discussions of the interactions among environmental quality and wildlife and human diseases and health. Topics include diseases of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals, the effects of environmental contaminants and climate on those diseases, and their interaction with human health.

BIOL 565. Advances in Cell Signaling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 300 or equivalent. Topical course focusing on advances in cellular communication by cytokines, hormones and neurotransmitters. Each semester, the course focuses on a different topic. Past topics have included cancer biology, allergy and asthma, and autoimmunity.

BIOL 580. Eukaryotic Biotechnology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: BIOL 310 and BIOZ 310L, or graduate standing in biology or related fields. Open to qualified seniors and graduate students only. Discussion of principles, concepts, techniques, applications and current advances in cellular and molecular biology aspects of biotechnology for animal and plant cells. The course will cover molecular construction of foreign genes; DNA cloning; technologies for DNA, RNA and protein analyses; nonvector and vector-mediated genetic transformation; gene regulation in transgenic cells; cell and tissue culture; cell fusion; and agricultural, medical and other industrial applications.

BIOL 591. Special Topics in Biology. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; 1-4 credits. An in-depth study of a selected topic in biology. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester and prerequisites. If several topics are offered, students may elect to take more than one.

BIOL 601. Integrated Bioinformatics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Presents major concepts in bioinformatics through a series of real-life problems to be solved by students. Problems addressed will include but not be limited to issues in genomic analysis, statistical analysis and modeling of complex biological phenomena. Emphasis will be placed on attaining a deep understanding of a few widely used tools of bioinformatics. Crosslisted as: BNFO 601.

BIOL 606. Quantitative Ecology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Principles and applications of mathematical ecology at the community level, including experimental design; sampling techniques, assumptions and limitations; and the use of cluster analysis, gradient analysis and ordination to evaluate, summarize and compare large data sets.

BIOL 610. Conservation Applications. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Covers the implementation of conservation techniques including monitoring, planning, education, habitat management and combining conservation with human development strategies. Focuses on how to make conservation work where biodiverstiy and human livelihoods must be reconciled. Students will utilize a number of computer programs to analyze and interpret management strategies.

BIOL 618. Ecosystems Ecology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 317 or equivalent or permission by instructor. Introduction to the structure and functioning of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The course complements other offerings in the graduate program by considering ecological processes at higher orders of organization and in the context of abiotic factors. Students will gain discipline-specific knowledge through lectures and readings while building quantitative and critical thinking.

BIOL 626. Physiological Ecology. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 4 lecture hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 317 or equivalent. This course examines the physiological adjustments and adaptations made by organisms in response to their environment.

BIOL 630. Patterns of Mammalian Reproduction. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A comprehensive ecological and evolutionary study of specializations and adaptive radiation in mammalian reproductive anatomy, the reproductive cycle, seasonality of reproduction and factors affecting litter size and developmental state of neonates. Human reproductive biology is included when pertinent.

BIOL 640. Evolution and Molecular Markers. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Methodologies and applications of molecular biology as they pertain to the study of evolution, with a focus on systematics, speciation and biogeography. The course provides proficiency in the understanding, interpretation and choice of appropriate molecular markers for evolutionary research, with particular attention to current methods and recent literature. Designed to benefit students of both natural history (ecologists, systematics, evolutionary biologists) and molecular biology.

BIOL 650. Conservation Genetics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Covers the application of molecular genetics to biodiversity conservation. Essential topics include molecular measures of genetic diversity, estimating loss of genetic diversity in small populations, detecting inbreeding, resolution of taxonomic uncertainties, genetic management of T&E species, captive breeding and reintroduction. Students will utilize a number of computer programs to analyze and interpret molecular genetic data.

BIOL 654. Environmental Remote Sensing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENVS 602, or permission of the instructor. This course provides a basic and applied understanding on the use of digital remote sensor data to detect, identify and characterize earth resources. Students are required to demonstrate an understanding of the spectral attributes of soils, vegetation and water resources through various labs involving both image- and non-image-based optical spectral data. Crosslisted as: ENVS 654/URSP 654.

BIOL 660. Developmental Biology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: biochemistry or cell biology or their equivalent. Molecular and cellular principles of developmental biology in model systems, including flies, worms, fish and mammals. Understanding of morphogen gradients, transcription, cell movements and signaling in development. Advanced methods are taught enabling students to interpret and present findings from the primary literature.

BIOL 676. Plant and Animal Cell Biology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: biochemistry or cell biology or permission of instructor. Molecular and cellular principles of cell behavior and function in plant and animal cells. Topics include intracellular transport, cell cycle control, signaling and cell motility. Advanced methods are taught enabling students to interpret and present findings from the primary literature in this field.

BIOL 690. Biology Seminar. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 credit. May be repeated for credit. Presentations by faculty and visiting lecturers, and discussions of research and developments in biology and related fields. Graded as S/U/F.

BIOL 691. Special Topics in Biology. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-4 credits. An advanced study of a selected topic in biology. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester and prerequisites. If several topics are offered, students may elect to take more than one.

BIOL 692. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; hours to be arranged. Credits to be arranged. Determination of the amount of credit and permission of instructor, adviser and department chair must be obtained prior to registration for this course. A course designed to provide an opportunity for independent research in any area of biology outside the graduate student thesis area.

BIOL 693. Current Topics in Biology. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. May be repeated for credit. Designed to develop skills in preparing and delivering oral presentations in conjunction with an in-depth study of a current topic in biology. Students present talks and lead discussions on the selected topic.

BIOL 698. Thesis. 1-16 Hours.

Semester course; hours to be arranged. Credits to be arranged. Independent research by students in areas of systematics, environmental, developmental, behavioral, cellular and molecular biology, and comparative physiology.

Chemical Biology (CHEB)

CHEB 601. Chemical Biology I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides an overview of the structure and function of biological macromolecules from a chemical biology perspective. The course will be divided into three sections -- nucleic acids, proteins and carbohydrates. Each section will initially focus on the thermodynamic properties of these macromolecules including the energetics of folding, thermodynamics of interactions and, for catalytic molecules, the kinetics of catalysis. Citing literature examples, the class will then focus on how small molecules have been used to uncover these properties.

CHEB 602. Chemical Biology II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Focuses on four broad areas of chemical biology: drug discovery (combinatorial chemistry, high throughput screening), natural product synthesis (combinatorial biochemistry), signal transduction (chemical genetics, pathway engineering) and protein translation (Phage display, in vitro translation/sections). Each area will begin with a brief overview followed by several examples based on the current literature.

CHEB 690. Research Seminars in Chemical Biology. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. May be repeated for credit. Seminars presented by students, staff and visiting lecturers where current problems and developments in chemical biology are discussed. Graded as P/R.

CHEB 697. Chemical Biology Research Rotations. 1,2 Hour.

A research rotation laboratory course that gives students different experiences and allows them to choose a research supervisor. Students will learn the theory and practice of advanced chemical biology research methods in a research lab setting. Students will be mentored by a postgraduate student, postdoctoral fellow or technician. At the end of each rotation, the students will give a presentation on the laboratory work done at that time. The lab hours are a minimum of three hours per week to achieve significant experience, but it is expected that students will put in appropriate time to achieve meaningful results in the laboratory setting. Graded as S/U/F.

Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM 504. Advanced Organic Chemistry I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An integrated study of certain free radical and ionic reaction mechanisms with emphasis on electronic effects and stereochemical consequences of these reactions.

CHEM 506. Introduction to Spectroscopic Methods in Organic Chemistry. 1.5 Hour.

Half-semester course; 3 lecture hours. 1.5 credits. Introduction to mass spectrometry, infrared and 1D 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, theory and practice in the elucidation of organic structures.

CHEM 507. Introduction to Natural Products. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the biosynthetic origins, isolation, structure elucidation and uses of naturally occurring organic compounds. Emphasis is placed upon three major classes of compounds, carboaromatics, terpenes and alkaloids.

CHEM 510. Atomic and Molecular Structure. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MATH 301 and PHYS 208. Survey of the pertinent aspects of quantum mechanics. Line spectra, atomic structure and molecular bonding.

CHEM 511. Chemical Thermodynamics and Kinetics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The concepts and principles of thermodynamics and their application to chemical problems. The rates and mechanisms of chemical reactions including collision and transition state theories.

CHEM 512. Applied Molecular Modeling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Atomistic and coarse-grained force fields. Principles behind molecular simulations. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo approaches to problems in chemistry, molecular physics, biophysics and nanoscience. Thermodynamic and transport properties. Free energy calculations and rare event dynamics. Hands-on introduction to basic programming and operating systems. Suggested background: physical chemistry (CHEM 303) or thermodynamics with elements of statistical mechanics (PHYS 340, CHEM 511 or CHEM 612).

CHEM 532. Advanced Analytical Chemistry. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Theories and principles of thermodynamics and kinetics relevant to analytical methods, including acid-base, redox, and metal complexation equilibria, nonaqueous systems, kinetics and an introduction to surface chemistry.

CHEM 550. Introduction to Polymer Chemistry. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of macromolecular compounds that includes classifications, methods of preparation, mechanisms, stereochemistry and applications. Physical characterizations, such as structure and property correlations, kinetics, thermodynamics, and molecular weight determinations are emphasized.

CHEM 580. Mechanical Properties of Plastics and Polymers. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course provides a link between the more practical aspects of plastics and the fundamental properties of the polymers from which they are made. Topics covered deal with the structure of polymers with emphasis on relationships with mechanical properties; rubber elasticity; the glass transition and other secondary transitions; time and temperature dependency; yield and fracture; crystallization and morphology; influence of polymer processing on mechanical properties.

CHEM 591. Topics in Chemistry. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-6 credits per semester. Maximum total of 9 credits for all topics courses. An in-depth study of a selected topic in chemistry. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester and prerequisites.

CHEM 604. Advanced Organic Chemistry II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An integrated study of the mechanism and stereochemistry of organic reactions and their application to organic synthesis. Emphasis is placed on addition and condensation reactions, carbanions, carbines, and other reactive intermediates.

CHEM 605. Physical Organic Chemistry. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The theory and application of physical methods in the study of the behavior of organic compounds. Topics covered include homogeneous kinetics, equilibria, acid-base catalysis, and the quantitative correlation of structure and reactivity as they apply to the understanding of the mechanisms of organic reactions.

CHEM 606. Advanced Spectroscopic Methods in Organic Chemistry. 1.5 Hour.

Half-semester course; 3 lecture hours. 1.5 credits. Prerequisite: CHEM 506 or permission of instructor. Advanced spectroscopic techniques including 2-D, multinuclear and solid state NMR; theory and practice in the education of organic structures.

CHEM 610. Applied Quantum Chemistry. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Quantum mechanics applied to chemical problems in UV, IR and NMR spectroscopy and the electronic structures of atoms and molecules; development of the self-consistent field equations. Suggested background: CHEM 510.

CHEM 611. Molecular Spectroscopy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course teaches the interaction of radiation and molecules; the rotation, vibration and electronic motion of molecules; molecular spectra and recent developments in laser spectroscopy. Suggested background: CHEM 510.

CHEM 612. Modern Statistical Mechanics: Fundamentals and Applications. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Fundamental topics in modern equilibrium and non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, with applications to selected chemical, physical and biological systems. Suggested background: CHEM 510 and 511.

CHEM 615. Chemical Thermodynamics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The study of the laws of thermodynamics and their application to pure phases, solutions and changes in state.

CHEM 616. Chemical Kinetics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the rates and mechanisms of chemical reactions, reaction rate theory, kinetic theory of gases and theories of catalysis.

CHEM 620. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The application of modern physical techniques for the determination of the symmetry, molecular structure, bonding and reaction mechanisms of inorganic compounds.

CHEM 621. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. . A coordinated study of synthetic methods, stereochemistry and reaction mechanisms including catalysis of inorganic, organometallic and bioinorganic compounds. Suggested background: CHEM 620.

CHEM 630. Electroanalytical Chemistry. 1.5 Hour.

Modular course; 3 lecture hours. 1.5 credits per module. Presents the theory and application of electroanalytical techniques including cyclic voltammetry, potential step methods and microelectrode voltammetry. Suggested background: CHEM 409 or equivalent experience.

CHEM 631. Separation Science. 1.5 Hour.

Modular course; 3 lecture hours. 1.5 credits per module. Students discuss theories and principles of separation science as applied to chemical problems with emphasis on current techniques, instrumentation and applications. Suggested background: CHEM 409 or equivalent experience.

CHEM 632. Chemometrics. 1.5 Hour.

Modular course; 3 lecture hours. 1.5 credits per module. Computer methods for experimental design and data analysis of spectroscopic, electrochemical and chromatograph data. Topics include sampling theory, detection limits, curve resolution, Fourier transform-based instruments and factor analysis. Suggested background: CHEM 409 or equivalent experience.

CHEM 633. Mass Spectrometry. 1.5 Hour.

Modular course; 3 lecture hours. 1.5 credits per module. Topics include mass spectrometry ionization methods, mass analyzers, theory and applications for ion structure determination. Suggested background: CHEM 409 or equivalent experience.

CHEM 634. Surface Science. 1.5 Hour.

Modular course; 3 lecture hours. 1.5 credits per module. Topics include types of surfaces requiring surface analysis, electron-surface scattering (AES, UPS, XPS, HREELS, LEED, STM, SEM), photon-surface scattering (IR, NMR, EXAFS), molecule/ion-surface scattering (ISS, RMBS), chemisorption techniques and work function measurements. Suggested background: CHEM 409 or equivalent experience.

CHEM 635. Spectrochemical Analysis. 1.5 Hour.

Modular course; 3 lecture hours. 1.5 credits per module. Topics include instrumental components, such as lasers, photomultipliers, array detectors, monochromators, lock-in and boxcar detection, waveguides and optical fibers, atomic spectroscopic methods, fluorescence, Raman and circular dichroism spectroscopies. Suggested background: CHEM 409 or equivalent experience.

CHEM 690. Research Seminar in Chemistry. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 1 credit. May be repeated for credit. In addition to reports presented by students, staff and visiting lecturers, current problems and developments in nanoscience and nanotechnology are discussed. Graded S/U/F.

CHEM 691. Topics in Chemistry. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-6 credits per semester. Maximum total of 9 credits for all topics courses. An advanced study of selected topic(s) in chemistry. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester and prerequisites.

CHEM 692. Chemistry Seminar Presentation. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 1 credit. May be repeated for credit. In addition to reports presented by students, staff and visiting lecturers, current problems and developments in chemistry are discussed.

CHEM 693. Chemistry Perspectives and Ethics. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. The objectives of this course are to prepare graduate students for a career in the physical sciences and develop graduate student competency in the responsible conduct of research from both ethical and safety standpoints. Graded as S/U/F.

CHEM 697. Directed Research. 1-15 Hours.

Semester course; 1-15 credits. May be repeated for credit. Research leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degree.

CHEM 698. Investigations in Current Chemistry Literature. 0.5 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 0.5 credit. May be repeated for credit. Up to 2 credits may be presented toward graduation requirements. Forum for graduate students to discuss recent literature in chemistry.

English (ENGL)

ENGL 500. Practicum in College English. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1-6 credits. May be repeated for credit. May not be applied toward degrees in English. Prerequisite: permission of director of graduate studies. Student participation in planned educational experience under the supervision of English department faculty. The practicum may include classroom teaching, Writing Center tutoring, or participation in research projects.

ENGL 501. Introduction to Graduate Studies in English. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Required of all new graduate students seeking the M.A. in English. An introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of advanced English studies.

ENGL 528. Children's Literature II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of classic and current children's books from a variety of literary genres. Magazines and media-related reference resources and journals are reviewed. The creative use of literature, its sociocultural functions and its contribution to the development of the oral and written expression of children from nursery to grade eight are explored. A focus on children with special problems is included. May not be taken for credit toward undergraduate English major if student has taken ENGL 351/TEDU 351. May not be used to fulfill literature requirement for M.A. in English or M.F.A. in Creative Writing, but may be taken as elective credit. Crosslisted as: TEDU 528.

ENGL 532. Applied English Linguistics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ENGL 390. Application of linguistic theories and methods to selected teaching problems, such as teaching English grammar and usage, teaching English as a second or foreign language, or teaching standard English to students who speak different dialects. Crosslisted as: ENED 532.

ENGL 550. Studies in Linguistics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ENGL 390. A general introduction to one area of linguistic study, such as pronunciation, grammar, stylistics, dialects, usage standards, lexicography, onomastics or semantics.

ENGL 552. Teaching English as a Second Language. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides students who plan to teach English to people whose native language is not English with a variety of instructional/learning strategies. Presents and explores current approaches and methodology, as these relate to linguistic features and pedagogy. Crosslisted as: TEDU 552/LING 552.

ENGL 560. Studies in British Literature and Culture. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Covers important topics in British literary and cultural studies including major literary periods, genres, major authors or literary movements. May be repeated for credit with permission of the instructor.

ENGL 570. Special Topics in American Literature and Culture. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Covers important topics in American literary and cultural studies including major literary periods, genres, authors and literary movements. May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

ENGL 601. Young Adult Literature. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examination of literature written for young adults, literature appropriate for young people in middle schools and high schools. Focuses on the content, characteristics and teaching of such literature. Crosslisted as: ENED 601.

ENGL 605. Introduction to Scholarship in English Studies. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Introduces the practice of research and scholarly discourse in English studies. Emphasizes scholarly resources (printed and electronic) and textual studies.

ENGL 606. Literary Criticism. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A comparative study of critical approaches to literary texts (reader-oriented, new critical and formalist, psychoanalytic, archetypal, feminist and gender-oriented, structuralist, poststructuralist, new historicist and postcolonial). These approaches will be evaluated in terms of their capacity to address major components of the literary process (author, text, reader, history, culture); they will also be tested on selected literary texts. Some attention is given to the historical development of criticism, but the primary focus is on its theoretical claims, methodologies and aims.

ENGL 611. Authors. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for credit. A study of the relationships among authorship (in material or discursive form), texts and cultural contexts.

ENGL 614. Cultural Discourses. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for credit. A study of contemporary literary and nonliterary texts produced within a designated period of time.

ENGL 620. Intertextuality. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for credit. A study of texts, potentially of disparate genres and contexts, focused on similar theme, concern or issue. Will examine both foundational, originating texts and subsequent reactions.

ENGL 624. Texts and Contexts. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for credit. A study of the ways in which texts shape, reflect and inform their cultural contexts.

ENGL 627. Genres. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for credit. A sustained and detailed examination of one or more genres.

ENGL 629. Form and Theory of Poetry. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated once for credit. Will address a number of key issues concerning the structure of verse and the function of poetic discourse and will provide readers and writers of poetry an opportunity to study and practice a broad range of poetic forms and techniques, as well as to explore various genre conventions and their thematic and rhetorical significance. Students may study poems from various periods, with some focus on the contemporary, and apply to them the insights offered by major theorists of poetry and poetics. They also may write imitations, parodies and responses examining and demonstrating poetic approaches.

ENGL 630. Form and Theory of Fiction. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated once for credit. Will address a number of key issues concerning the structure, conventions and function of narrative discourse and will seek to give readers and writers of fiction an opportunity to study a broad range of narrative forms, as well as to explore genre conventions and their thematic and rhetorical significance. Students will read stories and novels from various historical periods, with some focus on the contemporary, and apply to them the insights offered by major theorists of narrative. They also may write imitations, parodies and responses examining and demonstrating the aesthetics of fiction.

ENGL 631. Form and Theory of Creative Nonfiction. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated once for credit. Will address a number of key issues concerning the structure, conventions and function of varied types of creative nonfiction and will seek to give readers and writers an opportunity to study a broad range of forms in the genre, which may include magazine articles, research-based reportage, New Journalism, memoir, biography, autobiography, the meditative essay, the personal essay, the lyric essay and others, as well as to explore genre conventions and their thematic and rhetorical significance. Students will read across this range of forms, with some focus on contemporary writing, and apply to them insights offered by major theorists of the genre. They also may write imitations, parodies and responses examining and demonstrating the aesthetics of creative nonfiction writing.

ENGL 632. Community Writing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course teaches students how to use research in rhetoric and composition to design and deliver a community writing project that is mutually empowering, knowledge generating and publicly oriented -- designed to inspire social change.

ENGL 636. Teaching Writing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines theories and practices of teaching writing, with emphasis on the connections between theory and practice. Crosslisted as: ENED 636.

ENGL 637. Theories of Rhetoric and Composition. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL 636. A study of theory and scholarship in rhetoric and writing.

ENGL 638. Responding to Writing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course studies theories and practices for responding to expository and persuasive nonfiction texts, both students' and professionals', academic and creative.

ENGL 652. Studies in Writing and Rhetoric: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for credit. A study of an area or specialized issue in rhetoric and/or writing such as the history of rhetoric, theories of invention, qualitative research methods in writing, or studies in style.

ENGL 661. Themes in Interdisciplinary Studies. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for credit. A study in depth of a theme, topic, or concept involving two or more disciplines.

ENGL 666. Creative Writing: Fiction. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 workshop hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: graduate standing in M.F.A. program or permission of the Creative Writing Committee. All students seeking to enroll must contact the creative writing M.F.A. director. Study of the art of fiction writing, with the goal of producing professionally acceptable and publishable fiction. Workshop members shall produce a substantial amount of writing, short stories or a portion of a novel, and in addition shall be able to evaluate and articulate the strengths of their own work. Graded as pass/fail.

ENGL 667. Creating Writing: Poetry. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 workshop hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: graduate standing in M.F.A. program or permission of the Creative Writing Committee. All students seeking to enroll must contact the creative writing M.F.A. director. Study of the art of poetry writing, with the goal of producing professionally acceptable and publishable poetry. Workshop members shall produce a substantial amount of poetry and in addition shall be able to evaluate and articulate the strengths of their own work. Graded as pass/fail.

ENGL 668. Creative Writing: Drama. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 workshop hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: graduate standing in M.F.A. program or permission of the Creative Writing Committee. All students seeking to enroll must contact the creative writing M.F.A. director. Study of the art of playwriting with the goal of creating plays that are suitable for production. Workshop members shall produce a substantial volume of writing, one-act plays, or a portion of a longer play, and, in addition, shall be able to evaluate and articulate the strengths of their own work. Graded as pass/fail.

ENGL 670. Literary Editing and Publishing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for credit. A course in which the student learns to edit fiction, poetry, drama, or nonfiction. Genre covered will vary from semester to semester. Attention will be paid to the ways in which editors work with writers in all the technical aspects of editing, revising and publishing. Ethical responsibilities of editors to authors and their texts will be stressed. Questions considering the publishing world at large will be considered.

ENGL 671. Film and Television Scripts. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Study of the theory and practice of producing shooting scripts for television and motion pictures. Emphasis will be placed on the various kinds of scripts most commonly used by directors and cinematographers (e.g., silent, narrated and dramatized). Attention will also be paid to the ways in which script writers adapt material to audiences, and the ways in which strict time frames are imposed on scripts. Students will write scripts of various kinds and lengths.

ENGL 672. Writing Nonfiction. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Study and practice of writing one or more modes of nonfiction on the professional or preprofessional level, under critical supervision. Emphasis will be placed on such matters as organization, style, revision, and adaptation to particular audiences and publications. Possible kinds of writing could include reports; writing based on statistics; writing textbooks; writing separate chapters of books, and writing reviews, criticism and advocacy materials.

ENGL 673. Teaching Creative Writing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The course is intended for those who teach or plan to teach creative writing. A comparative analysis of different approaches to the teaching of creative writing. Attention will be paid to the different ways in which elements such as dialogue, sound pattern, scene development, line break, meter, voice and distance can be taught.

ENGL 692. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

1-3 hours. Variable credit. Maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite: permission from department chair. For students in English/English education to pursue, in depth, a particular problem or topic about which an interest or talent has been demonstrated.

ENGL 694. Internship in Writing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 6 practicum hours. 3 credits. Permission of director of M.A. program required. Analyses and practices of professional writing in settings such as business, government and industry.

ENGL 695. Directed Study/Major Project and Presentation. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits. May not be repeated for credit. Students who choose not to write a thesis will complete a substantial project with a graduate faculty adviser and share the results of his or her research in a public presentation. This project may be an expansion or reworking of a seminar paper or group of seminar papers and must contain a statement of the theoretical, critical or methodological issues important to the project. An abstract of the research will be submitted three to four weeks before the presentation date scheduled for that semester and must be approved by the M.A. committee. The presentation will take place before the adviser, M.A. committee members, and interested faculty and students on the date designated by the M.A. director. Graded PR. Note: Students who present a paper at a national conference or publish in a reputable journal may be exempted from the presentation upon the approval of the M.A. committee.

ENGL 798. Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

Continuous courses; hours to be arranged. Credits to be arranged; 1-3 credits per course. Preparation of a thesis or project based on independent research or study and supervised by a graduate adviser.

ENGL 799. Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

Continuous courses; hours to be arranged. Credits to be arranged; 1-3 credits per course. Preparation of a thesis or project based on independent research or study and supervised by a graduate adviser.

Foreign Languages (FRLG)

FRLG 510. Language Learning and Technology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Introduces the variety of ways technology can be used to enhance language instruction and student learning. Targeted technologies include audio/visual media, language learning software, the Internet and multimedia resources. Attention also will be given to considerations of learning style, curricular integration and enhancement.

FRLG 575. Intercultural Communication. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An experientially oriented seminar for persons preparing for or in careers necessitating intercultural communication among persons of differing cultural and/or national backgrounds. Special attention is given to teachers and other professionals who work with a clientele from Latin America, the Middle East, Asia, Africa and Eastern Europe. American cultural patterns broaden understanding of specific groups and engagement in intercultural communication. Crosslisted as: TEDU 575.

FRLG 591. Topics in Foreign Languages. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; 1-4 lecture hours. 1-4 credits. A detailed study of selected topics in one or more of the foreign language or comparative courses offered by the department.

Forensic Science (FRSC)

FRSC 505. Forensic Entomology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 1 laboratory hour. 3 credits. Enrollment requires permission of instructor. Course focuses on proper collection, preservation and identification of entomological evidence. Students collect entomological evidence from a mock crime scene and utilize these specimens for estimation of minimum postmortem interval. There is a significant laboratory component.

FRSC 510. Developmental Osteology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: FRSC 300; ANTH 307 and ANTZ 307; ANTH 310; graduate standing in forensic science; or permission of instructor. Examines the human musculoskeletal system and its development from an embryonic state to the adult form. Students learn the developmental course of each bone in the human skeleton and those of the associated soft tissue structures. Students are provided with training in the recognition of skeletal elements and bony landmarks, siding skeletal elements (and fragments thereof), knowledge of muscle structure and function and knowledge of nervous and venous structures associated with bony landmarks. Developmental defects and trauma associated with birth and child abuse are discussed. Juvenile age estimation from bones and radiographic images are emphasized.

FRSC 515. Advanced Forensic Anthropology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: FRSC 510; ANTH 307 and ANTZ 307; or permission of instructor. Focuses on estimation of the biological profile, statistical basis of estimations, pathological conditions, analysis of antemortem and perimortem trauma, human identification in mass casualty situations, age estimation of living individuals and writing of case reports. Techniques discussed will include macroscopic and microscopic analysis of morphology, histological analysis, radiographs and CT scans. There is a significant laboratory component.

FRSC 520. Forensic Fire Investigation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: FRSC 375 with a minimum grade of C (for undergraduate students), FRSC 670 or equivalent. Examines the specialized field of forensic fire investigation including on-scene investigation, fire theory, accelerant-assisted burn patterns and expert-witness testimony.

FRSC 565. Scientific Crime Scene Investigation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and/or laboratory hours. 3 credits. Presents the theory and techniques of scientific crime scene investigation including: recognition, documentation, collection and enhancement of physical evidence. A comprehensive introduction to the use of physical evidence for crime scene reconstruction is presented.

FRSC 566. Advanced Crime Scene Investigation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: FRSC 309 with a minimum grade of C (for undergraduate students), FRSC 565 or equivalent. An advanced study of the methods and techniques of crime scene investigation with an emphasis on crime scene reconstruction by the use of physical evidence. Course will include extensive practical applications with mock crime scenes.

FRSC 570. Forensic Science Seminar. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Must be repeated a minimum of three times for three credits. A seminar course featuring presentations by faculty, crime laboratory staff, students and visiting lecturers. Instruction includes discussions of research and developments and current topics in various forensic science disciplines and related fields.

FRSC 580. Applied Statistics for Forensic Science. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: STAT 210, STAT 212 or equivalent statistics knowledge; or graduate standing in forensic science. The course will focus on the forensic applications of data visualization methods, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, correlation measures, regression, multivariate analyses and concepts in database "matching" procedures. Techniques discussed will include ANOVA, MANOVA, principal component analysis, non-metric multidimensional scaling, discriminant function analysis and machine learning/neural network analysis.

FRSC 591. Topics in Forensic Science. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable lecture hours. 1-3 credits; maximum of 6 credits for all forensic science topic courses may be applied to major. Prerequisite: graduate standing in the forensic science program or permission of instructor required for enrollment. A study in selected topics in forensic science. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester and additional prerequisites.

FRSC 607. Forensic Taphonomy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Focuses on the process and sequence of human decomposition, as well as the burial, water disposal and surface dispersal of human remains. The course covers current issues in taphonomic research and practical application, including both domestic and international examples of mass disasters and mass graves. An understanding of the principles of archaeological stratigraphy is an integral part of the course. There is a significant laboratory component.

FRSC 644. Forensic Toxicology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Lecture and demonstrations in which common poisons and groups of poisons are discussed as to detection, diagnosis and treatment of poisoning. Demonstrations include basic principles of analytical toxicology, forensic science and courtroom testimony. Crosslisted as: PHTX 644.

FRSC 661. Analysis of Pattern Evidence. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: FRSC 673 and FRSZ 673L or equivalents. Covers topics in pattern evidence analysis including analysis of latent prints, impression evidence and bloodstain pattern analysis as applied to forensic casework. The course covers both the theoretical and practical aspects, using lectures and laboratory exercises focusing on the collection, analysis and interpretation of pattern evidence.

FRSC 662. Firearm and Toolmark Identification. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: FRSC 673 and FRSZ 673L or equivalents. Covers topics in firearm and toolmark identification as applied to forensic casework. The course covers both the theoretical and practical aspects, using lectures and laboratory exercises.

FRSC 663. Forensic Medicine. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Covers the fundamentals of forensic medicine including topics such as forensic death investigations, postmortem changes, time-of-death determinations, identification of unknown human remains and the forensic pathology of natural and traumatic deaths in adults and children. The characteristics and diagnosis of various types of trauma as well as the characteristics of common natural diseases that cause sudden death will be presented.

FRSC 670. Forensic Evidence and Criminal Procedure. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Presents the law of criminal procedure and rules of evidence as applied to forensic science. Explores issues of scientific versus legal burdens of proof, legal terminology and trial procedure.

FRSC 671. Instrumentation in Forensic Chemistry. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Theory and applications of chromatography, mass spectrometry and spectroscopy as used in modern crime laboratories. Instruction will focus on instrumental analysis as applied to drug analysis, toxicology, fire debris identification and general trace evidence examination.

FRSC 672. Advanced Drug Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and/or laboratory hours. 3 credits. Isolation and identification of abused drugs emphasizing the analysis of unknowns, problems encountered in analysis and chain of custody issues.

FRSC 673. Forensic Microscopy. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Establishes the foundation for the theory of microscopy. The knowledge acquired in this course can be applied to forensic disciplines such as firearms examinations, forensic biology, controlled substances, questioned documents and trace evidence.

FRSC 675. Forensic Serology and DNA Analysis. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and/or laboratory hours. 2 credits. Presents the theory and methodology used for the examination and identification of body fluid stains and determination of species. Provides students an introduction to the theory and methodology of forensic DNA analysis as well as forensic DNA quality control issues. Instruction will focus on molecular biology techniques as they are applied in a forensic DNA crime laboratory setting.

FRSC 676. Advanced Forensic DNA Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Focuses on the specific principles and modern procedures used for analysis of forensic nuclear and mitochondrial DNA evidence. Other topics include current research and development for forensic DNA instrumentation and applications, statistical interpretation of results and case report writing. Students gain individualized, hands-on experience with DNA procedures and instrumentation in the laboratory exercises. Students will process mock forensic casework.

FRSC 677. Professional Practices and Expert Testimony. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: must have successfully completed a minimum of 18 credit hours in the forensic science master's degree program. Topics related to professional practices in the forensic science field will be covered, including ethics, bias, quality assurance, laboratory management and professional development. Individual and group activities relating to these topics will be completed. Additionally, this course will examine forensic expert testimony in the courtroom, communication of scientific findings to a general audience, trial preparation and cross-examination in moot court format.

FRSC 680. Forensic Psychiatry. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Guilty mind requirements in criminal law. Competency to stand trial, insanity defense, mental disorder and crime. Behavioral profiling of serial murders and sex offenders. Issues in the use of clinical and statistical prediction methods in criminal justice. Crosslisted as: CRJS 680.

FRSC 681. Analysis of Fire Debris and Explosives. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: FRSC 671, FRSC 673 and FRSZ 673L or equivalents. Presents the collection, analysis and interpretation of fire debris and explosives as they are applied in forensic casework. Covers the theoretical and practical aspects. Laboratory exercises include hands-on instruction with appropriate instrumentation and techniques, including stereomicroscopy, gas chromatography, GC-MS, thin layer chromatography, HPLC and FT-IR.

FRSC 682. Forensic Analysis of Paint and Polymers. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 5 lecture/laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: FRSC 671, FRSC 673 and FRSZ 673L or equivalents. Covers topics in paint and polymer analysis including collection, classification and analysis of paint and fiber evidence as applied to forensic casework. The course covers the theoretical and practical aspects, using lectures and laboratory exercises. Laboratory exercises include hands-on instruction with appropriate instrumentation and techniques, including stereomicroscopy, microchemical testing, fluorescence molecular tomography, fluorescence microscopy, FT-IR and polarizing light microscopy.

FRSC 690. Scientific Writing. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Enrollment restricted to students in the M.S. in Forensic Science program. Focuses on scientific writing techniques, including abstracts, posters, review articles and research proposals. Emphasis will be placed on writing for scientific journals in forensic science and other peer-reviewed journals.

FRSC 692. Forensic Science Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits. Maximum credit for all independent study applicable to degree is 6 credits. The amount of credit must be determined, and written permission of instructor and program director must be obtained prior to registration. This course is designed to provide an opportunity for independent laboratory research in an area of forensic science or related scientific discipline. The end products of this experience will include an oral presentation at a campus seminar and a written report.

FRSC 693. Current Topics in Forensic Science. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. May be repeated for credit. A course designed to develop skills in reading journal manuscripts and delivering oral presentations in conjunction with an in-depth study of a current topic in forensic science. Student will conduct library research, present talks and lead discussions on the selected topic. See the Schedule of Classes for specific current topics course to be offered each semester and prerequisites.

FRSC 792. Research Techniques. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 3 laboratory hours. 1 credit. Enrollment restricted to students with graduate standing in forensic sciences and with permission of faculty mentor. Application of basic laboratory methods used in forensic science to the investigation of topics of interest. Emphasis on experimental design, data collection and analysis, communication skills, and critical thinking. Graded as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

FRSC 793. Directed Research in Forensic Science. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable laboratory hours. 1-3 credits. Prerequisite: must have successfully completed a minimum of 18 credit hours in the forensic science master's degree program or have permission of the instructor. Students must apply to the program director for this directed research experience one semester in advance of enrollment. A capstone course in which students will conduct independent, original laboratory research in a forensic specialization area of interest, while also gaining practical experience in crime laboratory practices and methods. This laboratory research experience will culminate in a presentation of the project results at a campus seminar and/or professional conference, and a written technical report of publishable quality. A minimum of 300 hours of laboratory research and a minimum of 3 credits are required for graduation.

Forensic Science Lab (FRSZ)

FRSZ 673. Forensic Microscopy Laboratory. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 3 laboratory hours. 1 credit. Establishes the foundation for the application and methodology of microscopy. The knowledge acquired in this course can be applied to forensic disciplines such as firearms examinations, forensic biology, controlled substances, questioned documents and trace evidence. The course consists of laboratory exercises and demonstrations.

FRSZ 675. Forensic Serology and DNA Analysis Laboratory. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 3 laboratory hours. 1 credit. Presents the chemical, immunological and microscopic laboratory techniques commonly used for the examination and identification of body fluid stains and determination of species. Provides working knowledge and hands-on practice with basic forensic DNA procedures, including DNA extractions, quantitation, PCR amplification analysis/genotyping. Instruction focuses on molecular biology techniques as applied in a forensic DNA laboratory.

FRSZ 792. Research Techniques. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 3 laboratory hours. 1 credit. Enrollment restricted to students with graduate standing in forensic science and permission of faculty mentor. Application of basic laboratory methods used in forensic science to the investigation of topics of interest. Emphasis on experimental design, data collection and analysis, communication skills, and critical thinking. Graded as Pass/Fail.

French (FREN)

FREN 500. French for Graduate Students. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed to prepare graduate students for the reading knowledge examination for higher degrees. Each graduate department will determine the nature and form of certifying examination.

FREN 501. French Communication. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; 1-4 lecture hours. 1-4 credits. An intensive study of communication in French. Variable credits; primarily oral, written and listening skills.

FREN 511. French Civilization. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; 1-4 lecture hours. 1-4 credits. Prerequisite: functional fluency in French since the class will be taught in French. A comprehensive study of the civilization and culture of France and its global expressions.

Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies (GSWS)

GSWS 501. Feminist Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This seminar provides an overview of the theories of feminisms.

GSWS 602. Feminist Research Epistemology and Methods. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course explores the implications of feminist theorizing across disciplinary and cultural contexts for both epistemology (theories of knowledge) and methods (theories and approaches in the research process). Students will examine how knowledge and power intersect, how gender theory and feminist politics influence research, how the knower influences knowledge production and how social location shapes inquiry. Students will experiment with feminist methods and approaches to researching issues related to gender, sexuality and women, and ethical considerations as these issues affect vulnerable populations.

GSWS 620. Theorizing Sexuality. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course examines and explores constructions of human sexuality (sexualities) and theorizes how these constructions operate within contemporary culture.

GSWS 622. Women and Public Policy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This seminar differentiates theories of feminisms and explores the effects of polices, or their absence, for women in the U.S., briefly examining theories of policymaking and the policy process in relation to feminist theories and the feminist project.

GSWS 624. Gender and Cultural Production. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This seminar takes as a starting point an understanding of culture as the expressive practice of meaning making that lies at the intersection of art, imagination, technology, space and politics.

GSWS 691. Topics in Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Course may be repeated with different topics as approved. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. An in-depth study of a selected topic in gender, sexuality and/or women's studies. See Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

GSWS 692. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours, variable credit. Maximum 4 credits per semester. Maximum total of 4 credits in all independent study courses. Prerequisites: completion of 6 credits in gender, sexuality and women's studies courses.

German (GRMN)

GRMN 500. German for Graduate Students. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed to prepare graduate students for the reading knowledge examination for higher degrees. Each graduate department will determine the nature and form of the certifying examination.

GRMN 502. German Communication. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; 1-4 lecture hours. 1-4 credits. An intensive study of communication in German. The content of this course will emphasize primarily oral, written and listening skills.

GRMN 512. German Civilization. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; 1-4 lecture hours. 1-4 credits. Prerequisite: functional fluency in German since the class will be taught in German. A comprehensive study of the civilization and culture of Germany and its global expressions.

Health and Movement Sciences (HEMS)

HEMS 500. Motor Development of Young Children. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Explores the development of small children, preschool, kindergarten and first-grade children through physical education. Emphasis will be on the construction of a program of motor development for each of these three groups. The programs will be based on the research findings in such areas as perceptual-motor development, motor learning, educational psychology and others. Those students and teachers in the fields of physical education, special education and elementary education should find this course useful in developing programs of motor development for their students.

HEMS 505. Contemporary Issues in Health. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Focuses on contemporary issues related to lifestyle and health behavior. Emphasizes the factors that influence health and the lifestyle changes that promote and maintain optimal health. Issues may include sexuality, nutrition, chronic and communicable diseases, aging, environmental health, policy, and health care systems.

HEMS 507. Teaching Health in Schools. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines health issues, family influences, teenage attitudes and signs of progress in health behavior. School health programs, including remedial, classroom instruction and environmental aspects of school life also are considered.

HEMS 514. Physical Activity for Special Populations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides fundamental information to students at the graduate level on physical activity programming for children with disabilities. Course content focuses on programming techniques and methods that are most effective in meeting the specific physical activity needs of the individual child. Emphasis is on Public Law 94-142 provisions currently affecting physical education programming for special populations; in particular, the development of specially designed physical education programs, individualized education programs and programming in the least restrictive environment.

HEMS 521. Pathomechanics of Sport Injuries. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Addresses musculoskeletal and sports injury mechanisms from a pathomechanical and pathophysiological perspective. Focuses on acute trauma and repetitive stress injuries to the musculoskeletal system. Emphasizes evaluation and diagnostic procedures and the pathophysiology and evaluation of mild head injuries commonly acquired as part of physical activity.

HEMS 550. Exercise, Nutrition and Weight Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides an in-depth analysis of the scientific principles associated with weight management strategies. Emphasizes the separate and combined effects of exercise, nutrition and behavioral interventions relative to weight loss, weight gain and weight maintenance. Includes life cycle nutrition, childhood obesity, adult obesity and chronic disease, weight management intervention strategies, eating disordered behavior and the female athlete triad.

HEMS 591. Topical Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. A seminar intended for group study by students interested in examining topics, issues or problems related to health, physical education, exercise science, recreation and sport. Crosslisted as: SPTL 591.

HEMS 600. Introduction to Research Design in Health and Movement Sciences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides an understanding of the basic knowledge and methodology of research in health and movement sciences. Develops the ability to critically read and evaluate research, acquire a conceptual understanding of statistics and develop an empirical study related to healthy and diseased populations.

HEMS 601. Movement Physiology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: HPEX 375 or equivalent. Investigates the physiological processes in relation to bodily exercises in everyday life and sports activities. Physiological changes in the human organism due to movement. Investigation and application of research to health and movement sciences. Students must design, conduct and write a pilot study.

HEMS 602. Statistical Applications in Health and Movement Sciences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Presents theory and techniques involved in the analysis and interpretation of data pertinent to research in health and movement sciences. Includes statistics applied to data encountered in published health and movement sciences research.

HEMS 603. Applied Fitness and Nutrition for Health and Movement Science Professionals. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An in-depth study of applied fitness and nutrition principles and practices. Emphasizes the application of knowledge and fundamental fitness and nutrition principles.

HEMS 604. Nutrition for Health and Physical Activity. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: HPEX 350 or equivalent. Provides an in-depth examination of the basic nutrients and their effects on health, fitness and sport performance. Emphasizes an understanding of the biochemistry of metabolism and knowledge of the current research related to nutrition, health and exercise performance.

HEMS 605. Psychology of Physical Activity. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Introductory psychology, personal health or equivalent. Examines psychological issues related to exercise and physical activity. Includes individual and group motivation theory and techniques, leadership effectiveness, mental health, mental skills training, injury rehabilitation, eating disorders, exercise adherence, addiction, over training and use of ergogenic aids. Emphasizes examining current research and applications of psychological principles and knowledge in a physical activity setting.

HEMS 606. Psychosocial Aspects of Sport and Physical Activity. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines social and psychological issues in sport and physical activity, with emphasis on socialization and motivation for sport and physical activity; patterns of participation and opportunities related to race, gender and social class; mental skills training for performance enhancement; aggression and violence in sport and society; and the role of sport and physical activity in the educational system. Emphasizes examining current research and applied methods in addressing these issues.

HEMS 610. Laboratory Techniques in Rehabilitation Science. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: HPEX 375 or equivalent. Laboratory-based course examining the various procedures related to measurement and experimentation in human performance. Includes examination of instruments designed to assess cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and pulmonary performance. Emphasis is given to application of instrumentation to physical training in healthy and diseased populations and to treatment and rehabilitation in a clinical setting.

HEMS 611. Biomechanics of Human Motion. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 205 or equivalent. Recommended: PHYS 201, or HPEX 374 or 373, or equivalents. Application of the knowledge and methods of mechanics in the study of the structure and function of the human body as applied to sport, physical activity and rehabilitation. Topics include kinematics, kinetics and methods of biomechanical analysis. Crosslisted as: REMS 611.

HEMS 612. Administration and Supervision of Physical Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Gives guidelines for administrative and supervisory policies and problems in physical education and explores observation techniques, standards for judging instruction, the supervisory conference and cooperative supervision. Emphasis is placed upon the common problems met by administrators and supervisors.

HEMS 613. General Motor Ability Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Investigates the theory of the construction of evaluative instruments in physical education with emphasis on a critical examination of existing measurement devices. Emphasis on the use of measurement as a tool for improving physical education programs.

HEMS 614. Motor Assessment for Special Populations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: HEMS 514 or permission of instructor. Provides the student with basic information regarding motor tests and observational instruments that assess and evaluate special populations. Focuses on the analysis of these tests as to their 1) main components and items purporting to measure these components; 2) administration, i.e., time, administrator's experience, group size, validity and reliability and standardization; and 3) use in establishing and monitoring annual goals and short-term objectives for an individualized education program.

HEMS 615. Orthopaedics and Therapeutics in Sports Medicine. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides in-depth exposure to procedures used in orthopaedics and physical medicine. Includes lectures and presentations by physicians, surgeons and other health care personnel. Focuses on linking diagnostic and surgical techniques used in orthopaedics and physical medicine to the rehabilitative treatment plan. Emphasizes the diagnosis and treatment of neuromuscular diseases and adaptive technologies for disabled populations.

HEMS 620. Motor Learning and Performance. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Analysis of early patterns of behavior and the development of physical skills in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Consideration of differences in motor proficiency and factors affecting the acquisition of motor skills and concepts of motor learning with reference to the improvement of instructional practices.

HEMS 621. Sports Medicine. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: HEMS 521 or permission of instructor. Designed to give the student knowledge in the advanced principles of prevention and treatment of athletic injuries. The course includes advanced first aid techniques and the more sophisticated means of athletic care and prevention. Students are exposed to such modalities as mechanical therapies, thermal therapy, cryotherapy, hydrotherapy and electrotherapy. One major component of the course deals with therapeutic exercise and its use in the rehabilitation of the injured athlete.

HEMS 637. Advanced Technology in Teaching Health and Physical Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Designed to prepare students to apply knowledge and skills in using technology in the physical education setting. Emphasis is placed on creating lessons using pedometers, downloadable heart-rate monitors, flip cams, computerized observational systems and the pocket PC. Focus is also on the use of local county grade-reporting systems.

HEMS 640. Health Care Organization and Delivery in the U.S.. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides an overview of the U.S. health care system and its many diverse components. Within the context of the U.S. health system, the course also provides students a perspective on the growing role of health behavior coaches as part of the interdisciplinary health team, the variety of employment opportunities and the business development potential of the field.

HEMS 641. Human Disease Prevention, Prevalence and Lifestyle Risk Factors. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines major categories of diseases, i.e., infectious, noninfectious, acute and chronic, including significant examples in each category. Current modalities for the prevention, treatment and control of diseases will be studied. In addition, the course will provide learning experiences to prepare students to convey information as health behavior coaches to a variety of audiences, including individual patients/clients, groups, specific priority populations and the general public.

HEMS 642. Theoretical Foundations of Health Behavior Change. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Investigates the relationship between health and behavior, with emphasis on both theory and application. The course addresses the theoretical foundations of behavior change, including an overview of leading theories as well as critical evaluation of their utility in promoting health behavior change.

HEMS 643. Fundamentals of Motivational Interviewing. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Restricted to health behavior coaching certificate students only. Introduces students to the fundamentals of motivational interviewing, a state-of-the-art, evidence-based communication and counseling technique. MI is designed to build clients’ and patients’ inner motivation and self-efficacy for positive health behavior change and maintenance. This course will expose students to the theory, principles and skills of MI that can be utilized with individuals or with groups.

HEMS 644. Advanced Motivational Interviewing. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Prerequisite: HEMS 643. Expands the students’ exposure, understanding and practice of motivational interviewing, a state-of-the-art, evidence-based communication and counseling technique. MI is designed to build clients’ and patients’ inner motivation and self-efficacy for positive health behavior change and maintenance. This course will reiterate the importance of the theoretical foundation underlying MI, examine applications of MI and provide opportunities for advancing students’ skills through role-playing specific to health behavior change.

HEMS 645. Application of Motivational Interviewing in Clinical Settings. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Prerequisites: HEMS 644, HEMS 647 and HEMS 648. Expands the student’s knowledge, skills and competencies in motivational interviewing by focusing on the utilization of this communication and counseling technique in clinical settings (i.e., health/medical care settings). Students will be exposed to applications of MI that can be employed with individual patients or clients who present with single disease processes or comorbidities.

HEMS 646. Application of Motivational Interviewing in Group and Community Settings. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Prerequisites: HEMS 644, HEMS 647, HEMS 649. Expands the student’s knowledge, skills and competencies in motivational interviewing by focusing on the utilization of this communication and counseling technique in group or community settings (e.g., support groups, groups in community organizations, groups in faith-based organizations, etc.). Students will be exposed to applications of MI that can be employed with groups who present with common health challenges or groups who are concerned with health promotion and disease prevention.

HEMS 647. Concepts and Applications in Chronic Disease Self-management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: HEMS 640, HEMS 641, HEMS 642 and HEMS 643. Evidence-based course designed to enhance the student’s knowledge of lifestyle factors such as physical activity, nutrition, weight management, stress management, medication compliance and tobacco cessation, etc., as they relate to the self-management of the most prevalent chronic diseases that affect the U.S. Students will learn hands-on skills to assist patients/clients across the lifespan.

HEMS 648. Health Behavior Change Counseling Techniques for Clinical Interventions. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: HEMS 640, HEMS 641, HEMS 642, HEMS 643. Focuses on the development of knowledge and skills that are essential to effective interpersonal communication and counseling, which will lay the foundation for effective health behavior coaching. Emphasis will be placed on fundamental counseling techniques and motivational interviewing and their applications to individual level health behavior change.

HEMS 649. Planning, Implementing and Evaluating Group/Community Health Behavior Change Interventions. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: HEMS 640, HEMS641, HEMS 642 and HEMS 643. Addresses the fundamentals of planning, implementing and evaluating health behavior change interventions in a variety of group or community settings, including support groups, worksite health promotion groups, community groups, faith-based groups, etc. Students will operationalize and apply the knowledge and skills essential to the effective practice of certified health behavior coaches.

HEMS 660. Neuromuscular Performance. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: HEMS/REMS 601 and HEMS 611. Examines the interrelationships between the musculoskeletal and neuromuscular systems. Includes examination of normal and abnormal biomechanics of the musculoskeletal system, biomechanical factors related to human performance, as well as acute and chronic adaptations of the neuromuscular system. Emphasizes how these principles can be applied to physical training in healthy and diseased populations and treatment and rehabilitation in the sports medicine setting. Crosslisted as: REMS 660.

HEMS 675. Clinical Exercise Physiology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Examines theoretical and functional techniques of graded exercise testing for functional and/or diagnostic assessment. Topics include pulmonary, cardiovascular, respiratory and myocardial physiology, and the principles and skills of exercise prescription based on metabolic calculations.

HEMS 690. Research Seminar in Health and Movement Sciences. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. Provides opportunities for presentation and discussion of current research and topics of interest in health and movement sciences. Presents relevant research for discussion delivered by guest researchers, faculty and students.

HEMS 691. Topics in Health and Movement Sciences. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. May be repeated for 9 credits. Check with division head for specific prerequisites. Examines specialized issues, topics, readings or problems in health and movement sciences.

HEMS 692. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for 6 credits. Determination of the amount of credit and permission of the instructor and division head must be procured prior to registration. Cannot be used in place of existing courses. An individual study of a specialized issue or problem in health or movement sciences. Crosslisted as: REMS 692.

HEMS 695. Externship. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1-6 credits. May be repeated for 6 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Plan of work designed by extern with prior approval of the offering department. State certification or equivalent may be required for some externships. Off-campus planned experiences for advanced graduate students designed to extend professional competencies in health and movement sciences. Directed by university faculty in cooperation with clinical on-site supervisors.

HEMS 797. Directed Research Study. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. A research study of a topic or problem approved by the student's adviser and completed in accordance with division policy regarding the directed research study.

HEMS 798. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1-6 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. A research study of a topic or problem approved by the student's supervisory committee and completed in accordance with acceptable standards for thesis writing.

History (HIST)

HIST 511. Studies in American History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Study of a selected topic in American history, primarily through lectures and readings. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

HIST 515. Studies in European History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Study of a selected topic in European history, primarily through lectures and readings. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

HIST 519. Studies in Ethnic and Social History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Study of a selected topic in ethnic or social history, primarily through lectures and readings. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

HIST 523. Studies in Virginia and Southern History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Study of a selected topic in Virginia or Southern history, primarily through lectures and readings. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

HIST 527. Studies in African-American History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Study of a selected topic in African-American history, primarily through lectures and readings. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

HIST 591. Special Topics in History. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credits. An intensive study of a selected topic in history.

HIST 601. Historiography and Methodology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the development of history as a discipline from ancient times to the present. The course examines the evolution of historical theory and philosophy, great historians, schools of interpretation, and problems of historical methodology. This course is a prerequisite for research seminars.

HIST 611. Readings in American History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Analysis of major studies and interpretative trends in a particular area of American history through readings and class discussions. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

HIST 615. Readings in European History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Analysis of major studies and interpretative trends in a particular area of European history through readings and class discussions. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

HIST 618. Readings in Transatlantic History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Analysis of major studies and interpretative trends in a particular area of transatlantic history through reading and class discussions. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

HIST 619. Readings in Ethnic and Social History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Analysis of major studies and interpretative trends in a particular area of ethnic or social history through readings and class discussions. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

HIST 623. Readings in Virginia and Southern History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Analysis of major studies and interpretative trends in a particular area of Virginia or Southern history through readings and class discussions. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

HIST 627. Readings in African-American History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Analysis of major studies and interpretative trends in a particular area of African-American history through readings and class discussions. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

HIST 631. Research in American History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Analysis of significant problems in a particular field of American history through research, writing, in-class presentations and discussions. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

HIST 635. Research in European History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Analysis of significant problems in a particular field of European history through research, writing, in-class presentations and discussions. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

HIST 638. Research in Transatlantic History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Analysis of significant problems in a particular field of transatlantic history through research, writing, in-class presentations and discussions. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

HIST 639. Research in Ethnic and Social History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Analysis of significant problems in a particular field of ethnic or social history through research, writing, in-class presentations and discussions. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

HIST 643. Research in Virginia and Southern History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Analysis of significant problems in a particular field of Virginia or Southern history through research, writing, in-class presentations and discussions. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

HIST 647. Research in African-American History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Analysis of significant problems in a particular field of African-American history through research, writing, in-class presentations and discussions. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

HIST 651. Public History: Theory and Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An overview of the field of public history, intended to introduce students to the range of professional historical activities practiced outside the classroom. Explores methods and skills including archival work, documentary editing, historic preservation, museum studies and oral history. The course also involves a sustained consideration of the theoretical issues that arise from public history work, defined as history of, for, by and/or with the public.

HIST 652. Documentary Editing and Scholarly Publishing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An overview of the processes by which historical scholarship is disseminated by publication. Students will practice editing scholarly editions of historic documents and reviewing manuscripts for publication in academic media. Special consideration will be given to the digital humanities and new technology's relation to the traditional publishing trade.

HIST 653. American Material Culture. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Material culture is a term encompassing all things created or modified by people -- such as clothing, tools, furniture, works of art, buildings and even landscapes. This course introduces students to the field of material culture studies and challenges them to study the American past through examination of its artifacts and architecture. Students will explore a range of disciplinary approaches and time periods, as well as the role of politics in the preservation and exhibition of material culture.

HIST 654. Oral History: Theory and Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An introduction to the practice and theories of oral history, a method employing interviews or sound recordings of people with personal knowledge of past events. Students will consider the benefits and limitations of the method as well as learn the general legal issues involved. Students will conduct their own interviews and practice the transcription of oral testimony.

HIST 691. Special Topics in History. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. An intensive study of a selected topic in history.

HIST 692. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. Maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite: permission of department chair. Requires an analysis of a historical problem or topic in depth under faculty supervision.

HIST 693. Internship in History. 2-4 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 2-4 credits per semester. Maximum of 6 credits. Determination of the amount of credit and permission of departmental internship coordinator must be procured prior to registration for this course. Students receive credit for work on historical projects with approved agencies.

HIST 698. M.A. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

1-6 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits.

Humanities and Sciences (HUMS)

HUMS 591. Special Topics. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-4 credits. May be repeated with different content. Specialized topics in the liberal arts and sciences designed to provide an overview of a topic not provided by an existing course or program. May be multidisciplinary.

International Studies (INTL)

INTL 500. Globalization and Transformation: Concepts and Realities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines how globalization significantly affects cultural processes at both local and national levels. Transformations of cultural understandings and practices under such circumstances will be explored. Virtual course components will bring causes, processes and consequences of the transformations of Western, Eastern and developing countries into focus. Crosslisted as: SOCY 515.

INTL 514. International Perspectives on Community Health in Developing Countries. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. This course may be taken for a maximum of 6 credits in two different world areas. Open to undergraduate (junior or senior level) and graduate students. Explores the impact of national and international policy decisions on the health and well-being of individuals and communities (country varies semester to semester). Examines the relationship of cultural beliefs and values on health-seeking behaviors. Allows students to become immersed in a culture different than their own. Evaluates the impact of international conflict and economic development on the health status of the community. See the Schedule of Classes for location. Crosslisted as: NURS 514.

INTL 591. Topics in International Studies. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Open to undergraduate (junior or senior level) and graduate students. A detailed study of selected topics in one or more geographic areas or comparative studies of global phenomena. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

Linguistics (LING)

LING 552. Teaching English as a Second Language. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides students who plan to teach English to people whose native language is not English with a variety of instructional/learning strategies. Presents and explores current approaches and methodology, as these relate to linguistic features and pedagogy. Crosslisted as: ENGL 552/TEDU 552.

LING 650. Second Language Acquisition. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed for those who plan to work with English language learners in diverse instructional settings. A major focus of this course is analyzing second language acquisition theories and how they apply in classroom settings. In-depth analysis of readings will enhance the students’ understanding of second language acquisition and the research related to this field. Students will observe classroom teaching, analyzing the application of SLA theories utilized in the instructional setting. Crosslisted as: TEDU 650.

Mass Communications (MASC)

MASC 591. Topics in Mass Communications. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable lecture or laboratory hours (depending on topic). 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and director of graduate studies. An advanced study of a selected topic in mass communications. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topic(s) to be offered.

MASC 602. Advertising Technology for Copywriters, Strategists and Media Planners. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 laboratory hours. 2 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. This course covers a number of computer applications, tailored to the specific needs of copywriters, account managers, account planners and media planners. Students will learn how to create and format documents using Microsoft Word for the Macintosh, including placement of images and manipulation of text from various sources such as the Internet. Students will learn how to create computer presentations with Microsoft PowerPoint for Macintosh. This course will teach the basics of page layout, including formatting documents, placement of images and basic typography. Additionally, students will learn how to use a scanner to capture images into Adobe Photoshop, and basic image modification techniques, such as brightening and sharpening, silhouetting an image and saving the image. Additionally this course covers the appropriate applications designed to capture and edit digital video, and will include discussion of the use of the Brandcenter's digital video cameras, and other accessories such as external microphones and lights. Certain applications specific to the needs of media planners and account planners, such as Simmons, SRDS and MRI also will be covered in this course.

MASC 604. Media Stories. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Students will identify, create and translate stories to the multiple screens of contemporary media with an emphasis on advertising, public relations and journalism. Students study contemporary storytelling cases and create original stories for professional communications.

MASC 605. Technology in the Classroom. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Beginning with a brief treatment of basic desktop publishing skills, students will learn layout and design using newspaper, magazine and yearbook models. They will master the functions of Photoshop, Illustrator, Adobe PageMaker and/or QuarkXpress and create promotional fliers/brochures and advertisements for their journalism programs. They will set templates and a style palette for school publications.

MASC 611. Research Methods in Mass Communications. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Fundamentals of mass communications research techniques (content analysis, survey research, experimental design, historiography), including an overview of computer applications, statistics, theory development and trends in the published literature.

MASC 612. Mass Communications Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. Nature, function and application of mass communications theory; structure, content and effects of media systems; social and technological events accounted for by a generalized theory of mass communications.

MASC 613. Mass Media and Society. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. A study of the mass media of the United States, with special attention to their historical development and their impact on other institutions. Consideration of ethical and legal aspects of the media, and problems such as access, control and accountability.

MASC 614. Media-governmental Relations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. Study of the interaction between the media and the government, and the role of the press in the governmental process as a disseminator, opinion-maker and adversary.

MASC 615. Depth Reporting. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: three undergraduate reporting courses or permission of instructor. A thorough examination of one or more issues in the forefront of the news, the environment, education, health care, science and others relevant to today's readers.

MASC 616. Mass Communication Law. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An intensive examination of media rights and restrictions, including libel, privacy, access to information, copyright, free-press fair-trial. Attention will be given to First Amendment theory, research techniques and administrative regulation of broadcasting and advertising.

MASC 617. Advanced Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MASC 611. An examination of a mass medium through design and execution of a research project using one of the traditional research techniques of the field. Students will have major and minor projects for systematic study of a medium.

MASC 618. Media Economics and Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 colloquium hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MASC 611 and MASC 617. Advanced work in media management research based on an examination of major contemporary issues and challenges concerning media management and economics. Student interaction with faculty, media managers and each other will lead to the design and implementation of major problem-solving projects.

MASC 619. Media and Public Opinion. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the role of the mass media in the formation and change of beliefs and attitudes, the involvement of the media with policy makers in shaping public opinion and public policy, and the interaction of media and public opinion polling.

MASC 620. Seminar in Mass Communications History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. An examination of historical methodology and content as related to the investigation and writing of mass communication history in the United States. Special attention is placed on the adaptation and the use of historical method by mass communications historians.

MASC 621. Advanced Public Relations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Students will explore a variety of case studies, decision-making analyses and advanced public relations programming in relation to private and public policy-making at the senior levels of management.

MASC 626. Critical Thinking in Media. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Focuses on the application of critical and creative thinking to solve communication problems. Provides students with opportunities to explore and expand their creative abilities through brainstorming sessions, creative techniques and team-oriented activities dealing with contemporary advertising, public relations and media cases.

MASC 642. Online Journalism I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Exploration and production of various means of journalistic communication using online resources. Various multimedia projects will be reviewed and discussed, as well as the best use and application of media types based on the information being communicated. Students will research news stories and examine the effectiveness of online presentations while exploring how online journalism can work with more traditional forms of communication.

MASC 643. Online Journalism II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MASC 642. Development of online journalism production skills and familiarity with the best uses and practices for publishing material on the Web and for administering news websites. Students will learn the skills for posting media and also about the systems for maintaining news organizations' entire websites.

MASC 644. Computer-assisted Reporting. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MASC 611 and 642. Provides a practical guide to online research, data analysis and other computer-assisted reporting and research skills. Students will learn how to find authoritative information, including news sources and data, through the Internet and other online resources. Students will also learn how to use spreadsheets, database managers, mapping programs, social networking analysis, statistical packages and other software to sort, summarize, analyze, visualize and present data. Course will cover how to evaluate the reliability of electronic information, how to find trends and integrate them into news reports, and how the First Amendment and journalism ethics apply to digital information.

MASC 645. Visual Journalism. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MASC 611 and 642. A theoretical and hands-on course that immerses students in all aspects of visual journalism, including videography, photography, informational graphics and photojournalism. Examines visual communication theory and applied uses of multimedia, particularly in online journalism. Activities include professional-quality projects for multimedia publication. Addresses legal issues in producing multimedia packages, including copyright law.

MASC 646. Convergence Law and Ethics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MASC 611, 642 and 685. Explores the delicate balance that exists between freedom and control of the mass media (print, broadcast and new media). Focuses on judicial decisions and reasoning, given the impact the courts have on interpreting the First Amendment. Will also focus on new legal and ethical concerns created by the Internet and digital newsgathering and presentation technologies. Students will be immersed in the ethical decision-making process through the case-study approach.

MASC 654. Organizational Communication. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Study of theoretical constructs of the communication process in organizations. Application of communication principles to managerial functions, training, telecommunications and other organizational situations.

MASC 658. Account Leadership. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Students will learn first-hand general leadership skills crucial to developing successful relationships with agency personnel and clients. Emphasis will be given to exploring ways students can contribute to accounts not only strategically but creatively as well. Students will learn presentation and communication skills as well as effective ways to manage accounts. Students will sharpen previously prepared strategies as well as interviewing skills.

MASC 660. Advertising Account Research and Planning. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MASC 650 and MASC 651. Develops student's ability to choose the most effective research methods for determining both the correct target market for a product and specific issues most pertinent to that market, in regards to positioning the product. Research work with consumer groups will demonstrate student's ability to develop thoughtful questions that will deliver valuable insight.

MASC 665. Building Global Brands. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MASC 650 and MASC 651. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Provides thorough coverage of an approach and framework for designing a comprehensive marketing plan suitable for implementations in an international setting, with particular focus on identifying and analyzing the important cultural and environmental uniqueness of single nations or global regions. We also will look at specific examples of cases that will better inform our planning efforts and will spend time examining various cultures in order to respectfully and appropriately engage them in our marketing plan.

MASC 671. Strategic PR in a Digital Environment. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. An introduction to the thinking and actions required to communicate strategically in today's dynamic socioeconomic environment. Focus is on the skills and information to handle strategic public relations. Introduces cutting-edge technology and using the Internet as a strategic communications tool. Professional responsibilities emphasized.

MASC 672. Strategic PR Research and Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Introduces the basic theories and practices of strategic public relations research and evaluation. Both qualitative and quantitative techniques are examined.

MASC 675. Strategic PR Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. An interactive exploration of navigating challenges from the perspective of organizational culture. Helps students foster diversity, support organizational change, make leadership more dynamic, operate ethically within the cultural environment and make the organization more effective overall.

MASC 676. Public Relations Ethics and Law. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MASC 675 or permission of instructor. An exploration of ethical and legal dimensions specific to public relations practice. Analysis of critical cases in the field.

MASC 681. Video Applications in Instruction. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: TEDU 556 and 610 or permission of instructor. Emphasizes the design and instructional strategies used with the production of video resources. Differentiates analog and digital video, importing images, video and sound, editing, previewing, transitions, filters, motion settings, superimposing, titles, special effect options, and exporting video. Students will produce and edit a personalized instructional module using digital video hardware and editing software. Crosslisted as: TEDU 620.

MASC 682. Strategic Media Relations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MASC 675 or permission of instructor. Focuses on what makes news, how different media work, how to determine the appropriate vehicle for the message and how to work with the media to control a message.

MASC 683. Strategic PR in the Global Environment. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MASC 671, 672 and permission of instructor. Examines the phenomenon of global strategic communications, including the enabling environmental factors. How to develop an integrated, holistic global communications program and how to manage such a program. Students experience one region of the world with an in-depth study tour.

MASC 684. Multiplatform Storytelling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MASC 643, 645 and 646. Students will develop new ways of storytelling that leverage the power of the print, broadcast and online media, combining two or more of those platforms into a single, multimedia package. Analyzes the origins of multimedia and its current trends. Themes include the history of multimedia journalism, the adaptation process for traditional media, the search for a business model and the new news audience.

MASC 685. The Business of Media. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Will provide students with both a macro and micro understanding of the business operations of small and large newspapers, television and radio stations and online media. Students will examine newsroom operations, advertising and human resource issues. Will also examine laws and regulations governing media as well as ownership trends.

MASC 686. International Journalism. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MASC 611, 642, 643, 644, 645 and 646. Explores how major news organizations in the U.S. and abroad cover international news in the 21st century as well as the various media structures and systems that are in place in countries around the world. Students will examine the power and impact of global news media in shaping public opinion. They will study trends in international coverage. Students will explore the role of the press in a democracy as well as in authoritarian or communist nations. They will examine the ethical and legal dimensions of international reporting across various media systems, regulations and protocols. The course will also emphasize the ways in which technology is rapidly changing how news is developed and disseminated. Coverage of wars and major world conflicts will also be emphasized.

MASC 688. Converged Media Applications. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MASC 644 and 684. Graduate-level research and production focused on multimedia. Students will complete a significant multimedia project that draws on their experiences and the skills learned in other graduate courses.

MASC 691. Topics in Mass Communications. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. May be repeated for 6 total credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and director of graduate studies. An advanced study of selected topic in mass communications. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topic(s) to be offered each semester.

MASC 692. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. A maximum of 3 credits may be submitted toward the master's degree. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and director of graduate studies.

MASC 693. Practicum in Mass Communications. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-6 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of director of graduate studies. Student participation in planned research or internship experience under the supervision of mass communications faculty. Graded as pass/fail.

MASC 694. Strategic PR Campaign Design and Implementation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MASC 675, 676, 681 and 682. Brings together all the various tasks and concepts used in public relations work to shape an effective campaign. Through projects students become competent and proficient in analyzing cases, strategizing, implementing and evaluating public relations campaigns at senior management levels.

MASC 695. Fieldwork/Internship. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1, 2 or 3 credits per semester. Maximum total of 3 credits toward graduation. Prerequisite: permission of director of graduate studies. Selected students will receive on-the-job training under the supervision of an instructor and the employer. Internships are available in newspapers, magazines, public relations, advertising, radio and television. Graded S/U/F.

MASC 697. Portfolio Development for Strategists. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MASC 653. Continues the development and demonstration of critical thinking skills, insights and creative abilities in a variety of areas sought by agency planning directors, media planning directors, management supervisors and recruiters. Development of concepts and materials necessary for the creation of mini-books and individual portfolios will be one of the main focal points. Independent projects pursued specifically for portfolio development also will be conducted.

MASC 699. Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

1-3 credits. May be repeated. A maximum of 3 credits may be submitted toward the master's degree.

Mathematics (MATH)

MATH 502. Abstract Algebra I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MATH 401 with a minimum grade of a C, or permission of instructor. A study of groups, subgroups, quotient groups and homomorphisms, group actions, sylow theorems, direct and semi-direct products, rings, integrals domains, and polynomial rings.

MATH 505. Modern Geometry. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MATH 300, and MATH 307 or MATH 310, or permission of instructor. Topics in Euclidean, projective and non-Euclidean geometries from a modern viewpoint.

MATH 507. Bridge to Modern Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment restricted to student with graduate standing. Metric spaces, normed vector spaces, inner-product spaces and orthogonality, sequences and series of functions, convergence, compactness, completeness, continuity, contraction mapping theorem, and inverse and implicit function theorems.

MATH 511. Applied Linear Algebra. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 310 or permission of instructor. The algebra of matrices, the theory of finite dimensional vector spaces and the basic results concerning eigenvectors and eigenvalues, with particular attention to applications.

MATH 515. Numerical Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment restricted to student with graduate standing. Knowledge of a programming language or mathematical software package recommended. Theoretical derivation and implementation of numerical methods. Topics to include direct methods, data fitting, differentiation, integration and solutions to ordinary differential equations.

MATH 535. Introduction to Dynamical Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment restricted to students with graduate standing. Theoretical and computational introduction to continuous and discrete dynamical systems with applications. Topics include existence and uniqueness of solutions, stability and bifurcations.

MATH 550. Combinatorics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MATH 211 or MATH 300; and MATH 350, both with a minimum grade of C; or permission of instructor. Topics include basic counting, binomial theorems, combinations and permutations, recurrence relations, generating functions, and basic graph theory with emphasis to applications.

MATH 555. Dynamics and Multivariable Control I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 301 and 310 or the equivalent. Systems of differential equations with controls, linear control systems, controllability, observability, introduction to feedback control and stabilization. Crosslisted as: EGRE 555.

MATH 556. Graph Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MATH 211 or MATH 300; MATH 310; and MATH 356, each with a minimum grade of C; or permission of instructor. Introduction to graph classes, graph invariants, graph algorithms, graph theoretic proof techniques and applications.

MATH 585. Biomathematics Seminar:____. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 1 credit. Prerequisite: MATH 301 or permission of instructor. May be repeated with different thematic content. Opportunity for students to develop their understanding of the connection between mathematics and the areas of biology and medicine. Activities include reading of classical and contemporary research literature, attending seminar talks and class discussions.

MATH 591. Topics in Mathematics. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. May be repeated for credit with different topics. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Open to qualified undergraduates. A study of selected topics in mathematical sciences. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester and prerequisites.

MATH 593. Internship in Mathematical Sciences. 3,6 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-6 credits. May be repeated for credit. Student participation in a planned educational experience under the supervision of a mathematical sciences faculty member. The internship may include supervised teaching, statistical consulting or participation in theoretical or applied research projects. A grade of P may be assigned students in this course. May be applied toward the degree in mathematical sciences only with the permission of the graduate affairs committee.

MATH 602. Abstract Algebra II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 502. A study of modules, vector spaces, field extensions and Galois theory.

MATH 607. Measure and Integration Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Math 507. Measurable sets and functions, sets of measure zero, Borel sets, Lebesgue measure and integral, fundamental convergence theorems, Lp spaces, and foundations of probability theory.

MATH 610. Advanced Linear Algebra. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Vector spaces, bases and dimension, change of basis. Linear transformations, linear functionals. Simultaneous triangularization and diagonalization. Rational and Jordan canonical forms.

MATH 615. Iterative Numerical Methods. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 515. Theoretical development of solutions to large linear and nonlinear systems by iterative methods with consideration given to optimal implementation.

MATH 632. Ordinary Differential Equations I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MATH 507 and MATH 535. Linear systems theory; existence, uniqueness and continuous dependence for nonlinear systems; invariant manifolds; stable manifold theorem; Hartman-Grobman theorem; Lyapunov stability theory; Hamiltonian and gradient systems.

MATH 633. Partial Differential Equations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 507. Classification of partial differential equations, initial and boundary value problems, well-posedness; first-order equations and methods of characteristics; wave equation; heat equation, transform methods, maximum principle, energy methods; Laplace's equation. Other topics may vary depending on the interest of the students and the instructor.

MATH 640. Mathematical Biology I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 535. Mathematical modeling in the biological and medical sciences. Topics will include continuous and discrete dynamical systems describing interacting and structured populations, resource management, biological control, reaction kinetics, biological oscillators and switches, and the dynamics of infectious diseases.

MATH 650. Advanced Combinatorics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 550. Topics include advanced applications of the pigeonhole principle and inclusion-exclusion principle, recurrence relations, generating functions, special counting sequences, Ramsey theory, and combinatorial designs and codes.

MATH 655. Dynamics and Multivariable Control II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MATH 555 and MATH 507 recommended, or permission of instructor. Control problems for nonlinear systems of ordinary differential equations, methods of feedback control to achieve control objectives. Crosslisted as: ENGR 655.

MATH 656. Advanced Graph Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 556. This course lays a rigorous theoretical foundation for further advanced study in graph theory. Topics may include connectivity, matching, planarity, coloring, Hamiltonian cycles and topological graph theory, as well as further advanced material.

MATH 661. Number and Operations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Ways of representing numbers, relationships between numbers, number systems, the meanings of operations and how they relate to one another, and computation within the number system as a foundation for algebra; episodes in history and development of the number system; and examination of the developmental sequence and learning trajectory as children learn number concepts. A core course for preparation as a K-8 mathematics specialist. Not applicable to M.S. in Mathematical Sciences.

MATH 662. Geometry and Measurement. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Explorations of the foundations of informal measurement and geometry in one, two and three dimensions. The van Hiele model for geometric learning is used as a framework for how children build their understanding of length, area, volume, angles and geometric relationships. Visualization, spatial reasoning and geometric modeling are stressed. As appropriate, transformational geometry, congruence, similarity and geometric constructions will be discussed. A core course of preparation as a K-8 mathematics specialist. Not applicable to M.S. in Mathematical Sciences.

MATH 663. Functions and Algebra. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examination of representation and analysis of mathematical situations and structures using generalization and algebraic symbols and reasoning. Attention will be given to the transition from arithmetic to algebra, working with quantitative change, and the description of and prediction of change. A core course for preparation as a K-8 mathematics specialist. Not applicable to M.S. in Mathematical Sciences.

MATH 664. Statistics and Probability. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An introduction to probability, descriptive statistics and data analysis; exploration of randomness, data representation and modeling. Descriptive statistics will include measures of central tendency, dispersion, distributions and regression. Analysis of experiments requiring hypothesizing, experimental design and data gathering. A core course for preparation as a K-8 mathematics specialist. Not applicable to M.S. in Mathematical Sciences.

MATH 665. Rational Numbers and Proportional Reasoning. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Basic number strands in fractions and rational numbers, decimals and percents; ratios and proportions in the school curriculum. Interpretations, computations and estimation with a corrdinated program of activities that develop both rational number concepts and skills and proportional reasoning. A core course for preparation as a K-8 mathematics specialist. Not applicable to M.S. in Mathematical Sciences.

MATH 667. Functions and Algebra II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours, 3 credits. Prerequisite: Math 663 or equivalent. Examination of the K-8 strands related to algebra. A study of linear, exponential and quadratic functions. Use of number lines, coordinate axes, tables, graphing calculators and manipulatives to understand core algebraic ideas and real-world contexts. Course provides preparation for K-8 mathematics specialists. Not applicable to M.S. in Mathematical Sciences.

MATH 690. Research Seminar. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours; 2 credits. Enrollment is restricted to students with graduate standing. Discussion of topics in the mathematical sciences stimulated by independent reading in selected area. Each student will give at least one oral presentation and complete an expository writing assignment.

MATH 691. Special Topics in Mathematics. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A detailed study of selected topics in mathematics. Possible topics include commutative rings and algebras, topological groups, special functions, Fourier analysis, abstract harmonic analysis, operator theory, functional analysis, differential geometry, Banach algebras and control theory.

MATH 697. Directed Research. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits per semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Supervised individual research and study in an area not covered in the present curriculum or in one which significantly extends present coverage. Research culminates with an oral presentation and submission of a written version of this presentation to the supervising faculty member.

MATH 698. Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

Hours to be arranged. 1-3 credits. A total of 3 or 6 credits may be applied to the M.S. in Mathematical Sciences/Applied Mathematics or to the M.S. in Mathematical Sciences/Mathematics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Independent research culminating in the writing of the required thesis as described in this bulletin. Grade of S/U/F may be assigned in this course.

MATH 707. Functional Analysis I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 507. Banach and Hilbert spaces, bounded linear maps, Hahn-Banach theorem, open mapping theorem, dual spaces, weak topologies, Banach-Alaoglu theorem, reflexive spaces, compact operators, spectral theory in Hilbert spaces.

MATH 715. Numerical Solutions for Differential Equations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 515 or MATH 615. Students will use the finite difference method and the finite element method to solve ordinary and partial differential equations. Course will explore the theoretical underpinnings of the techniques and implement the methods to solve a variety of equations.

MATH 727. Topics in Analysis: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for credit with different topics. A detailed study of selected topics, which may include complex analysis, geometric analysis, harmonic analysis, mathematical logic, nonlinear functional analysis, nonstandard analysis and variational analysis.

MATH 732. Ordinary Differential Equations II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 632. Center manifold theory; normal form theory; oscillations in nonlinear systems; local bifurcation theory of equilibria and periodic orbits.

MATH 750. Topics in Combinatorics: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated with different topics for credit. Prerequisite: MATH 650. A detailed study of selected topics, which may include probabilistic methods, linear algebra methods, extremal problems, partially ordered sets and symmetric functions.

MATH 756. Topics in Graph Theory: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated with different topics for credit. Prerequisite: MATH 656. A detailed study of selected topics, which may include extremal graph theory, spectral graph theory, infinite graphs, random graphs and graph minors.

MATH 769. Topics in Applied Mathematics: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated with different topics for credit. A detailed study of selected topics, which may include advanced partial differential equations, discrete dynamical systems, fluid dynamics, computational physiology, disease dynamics, kinetic theory, optimal transportation, numerical optimization and population dynamics.

Media, Art, and Text (MATX)

MATX 601. Texts and Textuality. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Explores theories of texts and textuality as they relate to the study of media, the arts and discourse of any kind.

MATX 602. History of Media, Art, and Text. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines the history of communication technologies in their social and cultural contexts, with an emphasis on the development of contemporary digital technology and new media. Students will explore how the interactions between communication practices and technologies are related to institutions, identity formation, cultural values, social practices and economic conditions.

MATX 603. Mass Media. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines the history of mass media and the leading theories, concepts and methods for mass media research.

MATX 604. Interdisciplinary Workshop. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment restricted to first-year MATX students. Students gain an understanding of current interdisciplinary theory and practice across media, art, and text. Examination of real-world examples provides a foundation for academic and professional careers in today’s interdisciplinary digital environment. Workshopping of students’ preliminary dissertation ideas, conference abstracts, teaching portfolios and professional websites develops content and skills needed for the MATX e-portfolio. Graded as pass/fail.

MATX 690. Seminar in Media, Art, and Text. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Graduate-level research and reading centered on interdisciplinary study.

MATX 696. Internship. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits; may be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Planned experiences approved by student's adviser under the supervision of professionals and evaluated by university faculty.

MATX 791. Directed Study. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits; may be repeated for credit. Focuses on a selected topic chosen by student and approved by student's adviser.

MATX 897. Dissertation Project. 1-12 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-12 credits; may be repeated for credit. Research and work leading to the completion of the dissertation project.

Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (NANO)

NANO 570. Nanoscale Physics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course builds a fundamental understanding of the unique properties of materials with nanoscale dimensions and emphasizes the physics and thermodynamics underlying several phenomena encountered in nanotechnology. The course starts from a general description of size effects and then moves to describe the fundamental aspects of nanocluster physics such as magic numbers, and concludes with a description of the theory and fabrication of nanoscale devices. Suggested background: PHYS 380.

NANO 571. Nanoscale Chemistry. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course builds a fundamental understanding of the unique chemical properties of materials with nanoscale dimensions and emphasizes the synthetic chemistry encountered in nanotechnology. The course starts from a description of crystallization and growth models and concludes with discussion of several different synthetic approaches of nanoscale systems. Suggested background: PHYS 380.

NANO 650. Experimental Techniques in Nanoscience I. 1.5 Hour.

Semester course; 1.5 lecture hours. 1.5 credits. The course will focus on a variety of instrumental methods and techniques commonly applied to the characterization of nanomaterials. Particular attention will be placed on the theory behind the measurements, instrument safety, sample preparation and data analysis/interpretation. Topics will focus on X-ray, optical and electron characterization techniques. Suggested background: CHEM 409 or PHYS 450.

NANO 651. Experimental Techniques in Nanoscience II. 1.5 Hour.

Semester course; 1.5 lecture hours. 1.5 credits. The course will focus on a variety of instrumental methods and techniques commonly applied to the characterization of nanomaterials. Particular attention will be placed on the theory behind the measurements, instrument safety, sample preparation and data analysis/interpretation. Topics will cover morphological and physical properties characterization tools. Suggested background: CHEM 409 or PHYS 450.

NANO 660. Theoretical Studies of Nanostructures. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CHEM 660 or PHYS 580. Introduction to theoretical techniques needed to study electronic and magnetic properties of nanostructures. Covers theoretical first-principles approaches to study electronic structure of molecules, clusters, nanostructure materials and condensed matter, including determination of geometry and electronic states. Will also cover magnetic properties in reduced sizes, including quantum effects and the model Hamiltonians. A brief discussion of effective interatomic molecular potentials and their application in monte-carlo and molecular dynamics methods will be included, as well as a discussion of application of nanomaterials to medical areas. Suggested background: CHEM 660 or PHYS 580.

NANO 661. Computational Nanoscience. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CHEM 511, CHEM 512 or CHEM 612. Open only to students admitted to the Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Ph.D. program. Introduction to computational methods used to model true nanostructures containing more than 10<sup>5</sup> atoms and whose assembly, morphology and properties are governed by noncovalent interactions. Structural and dynamic aspects of the computational methods will be covered throughout the course. Applications to nanotechnology and environmental cleanup will be covered through special topics assignments during the semester and discussed by the end of the course.

NANO 690. Research Seminar in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 1 credit. May be repeated for credit. In addition to reports presented by staff and visiting lecturers, current problems and developments in nanoscience and nanotechnology are discussed. Graded S/U/F.

NANO 692. Nanoscience Seminar Presentation. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 1 credit. May be repeated for credit. In addition to reports presented by students, staff and visiting lecturers, current problems and developments in chemistry are discussed.

Operations Research (OPER)

OPER 520. Game Theory and Linear Programming. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 310. The mathematical basis of game theory and linear programming. Matrix games, linear inequalities and convexity, the mini-max theorems in linear programming, computational methods and applications. Crosslisted as: MATH 520.

OPER 527. Optimization I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: graduate status in mathematical sciences or systems modeling and analysis, or permission of the instructor. Introduction to optimization and mathematical programming. Course addresses fundamental concepts of optimization (such as optimality conditions and duality) as well as the construction, solution, analysis and application of linear programming and network models. Emphasis is placed on using software to solve problems as well as on understanding its underlying methodology. Integer programming models will be introduced. Students may not receive degree credit for both OPER 427 and OPER 527.

OPER 528. Stochastic Simulation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: graduate status in mathematical sciences, systems modeling and analysis, or decision sciences and business analytics, or permission of the instructor. An introduction to stochastic discrete-event simulation. The course covers simulation modeling and programming in general-purpose languages (e.g., VBA for Excel) and (briefly) in specialized simulation environments (e.g., Arena, @Risk). The probability foundations of stochastic simulation of stochastic processes, random number and variate generation, variance reduction techniques, and proper design and analysis of the simulation experiment are emphasized. Applications are drawn from manufacturing, finance, logistics and service systems. Students may not receive degree credit for both OPER 428 and OPER 528.

OPER 591. Topics in Operations Research. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. A detailed study of selected topics in operations research.

OPER 627. Optimization II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: OPER 527. This course will address basic theory and algorithms for nonlinear optimization (unconstrained and constrained). Both theoretical foundations and practical implementations of optimization algorithms will be covered.

OPER 635. Network Models and Graph Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: OPER 527 or permission of the instructor. This course will focus on optimization models for network problems, as well as on the underlying graph theoretic structure for such models. Emphasis will be on solution procedures and applications with some discussion of related implementation issues. The course will concentrate on the study of polynomial-time algorithms for well-solved problems. May also include treatment of solution techniques for NP-hard network problems. Possible topics for the course include, but are not limited to, maximum flows/minimum cuts in networks, minimum spanning trees, minimum cost flows, matching and assignment, shortest path problems, traveling salesman problems and multicommodity flows.

OPER 636. Machine Learning Algorithms. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment restricted to students with graduate status in mathematical sciences, systems modeling and analysis, decision sciences and business analytics, or computer science, or by permission of the instructor. Includes an in-depth analysis of machine learning algorithms for data mining, equipping students with skills necessary for the design of new algorithms. Analyses will include framing algorithms as optimization problems and a probabilistic analysis of algorithms. Students will be exposed to current areas of research in the construction of data mining algorithms. Crosslisted as: STAT 636.

OPER 639. Practical Optimization. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: OPER 527. The application of optimization theory toward the solution of practical problems in operations research. The use and analysis of computer programs available to solve such problems. The algorithms used in these programs will be discussed from a practical and theoretical point of view.

OPER 641. Stochastic Simulation and Monte Carlo Methods. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: STAT 513 and either STAT 503 or STAT 613. Addresses the methodological foundation of applying stochastic modeling and simulation with a focus on introducing simulation concepts through examples, algorithms and experiments. Topics include simulation output analysis, input modeling, simulation optimization, steady-state simulation, variance reduction techniques, sensitivity analysis and Monte Carlo optimization.

OPER 643. Decision and Risk Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: graduate status in mathematical sciences, systems modeling and analysis, or decision sciences and business analytics, or permission of the instructor. This course presents the decision and risk analysis theory and methodology. Decision analysis applies to hard problems involving sequential decisions, major uncertainties, significant outcomes and complex values. The course includes: decision structuring with influence diagrams and decision trees; modeling uncertainty with subjective probabilities; sensitivity analysis and the value of information; and modeling preferences with utility functions. Decision and risk analysis applications in business and government are considered.

OPER 645. Queuing Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate status in mathematical sciences or systems modeling and analysis, or permission of the instructor. This operations research course provides a development of some basic queuing systems. Such systems will include birth-death queues, as well as the M/G/I and GI/M/S queuing systems. Other topics may include the GI/G/I queues, overflow queues and some basic queuing networks.

OPER 647. Multiobjective Decision Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate status in mathematical sciences, systems modeling and analysis, or decision sciences and business analytics, or permission of the instructor. Introduction to the mathematical foundations of multiattribute utility theory. Topics covered include: structuring objectives; tradeoffs under certainty; unidimensional utility theory; multiattribute preferences under uncertainty; preferences over time; and aggregation of individual preferences. Real world applications will be discussed throughout.

OPER 648. Systems Reliability Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate status in mathematical sciences or systems modeling and analysis, or permission of the instructor. An introduction to engineering reliability and risk analysis, specifically failure data analysis, maintenance problems, system reliability and probabilistic risk assessment. Applications in computer science and engineering will include stochastic characterization of wear in hardware systems and the development of failure models for software systems. Decision problems such as the optimal maintenance of repairable systems and optimal testing policies for hardware and software systems will be examined. The analysis of risk through fault trees, event trees and accident precursor analysis also will be discussed. Crosslisted as: STAT 648.

OPER 649. Statistical Quality Control. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate status in mathematical sciences or systems modeling and analysis, or permission of the instructor. Demonstrates how statistics and data analysis can be applied effectively to process control and management. Topics include the definition of quality, its measurement through statistical techniques, variable and attribute control charts, CUSUM charts, multivariate control charts, process capability analysis, design of experiments, and classical and Bayesian acceptance sampling. Statistical software will be used to apply the techniques to real-life case studies from manufacturing and service industries. Crosslisted as: STAT 649.

OPER 690. Research and Communications Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: 9 graduate credits in operations research (OPER) and/or statistics (STAT) and permission of the instructor. Designed to help students attain proficiency in professional and academic communication and research in the context of statistics and operations research. The course focuses on the discipline-specific communication and research skills necessary to excel in careers or graduate studies in these disciplines. Crosslisted as: STAT 690.

OPER 691. Special Topics in Operations Research. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. A detailed study of selected topics in operations research.

OPER 696. Applied Project. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours (to be arranged). 1-3 credits. Up to three credits will be applied to the M.S. in Mathematical Sciences (operations research or statistics concentration) per section. Can be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: SSOR 690 or permission of the faculty adviser. Designed to allow students to apply concepts and theories learned in other courses to a practical situation. Includes the selection, written description, completion and written report of the project and a presentation of the findings. Students may not receive credit for both OPER/STAT 696 and OPER/STAT 698. Graded as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Crosslisted as: STAT 696.

OPER 697. Directed Research. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits. May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Supervised individual research and study in an area not covered in the present curriculum or in one which significantly extends present coverage. Research culminates with an oral presentation and submission of a written version of this presentation to the supervising faculty member.

OPER 698. Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

Hours to be arranged. 1-3 credits. A total of 3 or 6 credits may be applied to the M.S. in Mathematical Sciences/Operations Research. (A total of 3 credits for an expository thesis or a total of 6 credits for a research thesis.) May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisite: graduate standing. Independent research culminating in the writing of the required thesis as described in this bulletin. Grade of S/U/F may be assigned in this course.

OPER 731. Discrete Optimization. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: OPER 527. Provides the theoretical background necessary to design and evaluate advanced solution techniques for discrete optimization problems. Topics include theory of polyhedra and valid inequalities for integer programming models, matchings, computational complexity, and sufficient conditions for integer programs to be polynomially solvable. Scheduling, packing, covering and routing models will also be examined.

OPER 732. Optimization Under Uncertainty. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: OPER 527; graduate standing in mathematical sciences or systems modeling and analysis; or permission of the instructor. Offers an exploration of issues concerning decision-making problems under uncertainty using mathematical programming tools. Topics addressed include modeling uncertainty in optimization models, two-stage stochastic programs with recourse, chance constrained programs, statistical inference in stochastic programs and robust optimization. Special attention is paid to the algorithms, approximation via sampling and applications.

OPER 736. Mathematics of Knowledge and Search Engines. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: STAT 541 or equivalent. Investigates the mathematics, methods and algorithms for searching for and extracting structures of interest (knowledge) from large and possibly high-dimensional datasets. The motivation is the rapid and phenomenal growth of the search engine (as demonstrated by Google) as a major tool for search on the Internet, which has impacted commerce, education and the study of social, financial and scientific datasets. The development of the mathematical and statistical learning algorithms behind these search engines has led to advances in how large, high-dimensional datasets can be effectively analyzed for the extraction of knowledge. Crosslisted as: STAT 736.

OPER 741. Advanced Stochastic Simulation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: STAT 513, OPER 528 and either OPER 503 or 613, or permission of the instructor. This is an advanced-level course on stochastic modeling and simulation. State-of-the-art topics on simulation theory and methodology will be taught through lectures and guided literature review. Tentative topics include advanced simulation output analysis, simulation optimization, steady-state simulation, nested simulation, metamodeling, variance reduction (stratification, importance sampling, quasi-Monte Carlo, etc.).

OPER 743. Decision Analysis II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: OPER 643 or OPER 647. Introduces the current areas of research in the field of decision analysis, which applies to hard problems involving sequential decisions, major uncertainties, significant outcomes and complex values. Includes current research in decision structuring and representation, modeling uncertainty with subjective probabilities, modeling preferences with utility functions and modeling multiattribute preferences.

OPER 791. Special Topics in Operations Research. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A detailed study of selected advanced topics in operations research.

Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 521. Aesthetics. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 3 lecture hours. 3, 3 credits. A critical survey of aesthetics from antiquity to the 20th century. First semester: antiquity to the Renaissance; Second semester: the Renaissance to the present. Topics to be considered include the nature of art, aesthetic experience, the aesthetic analysis in the arts of painting, music, architecture and the motion picture.

PHIL 522. Aesthetics. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 3 lecture hours. 3, 3 credits. A critical survey of aesthetics from antiquity to the 20th century. First semester: antiquity to the Renaissance; Second semester: the Renaissance to the present. Topics to be considered include the nature of art, aesthetic experience, the aesthetic analysis in the arts of painting, music, architecture and the motion picture.

PHIL 591. Topics in Philosophy. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-4 credits. Prerequisite: written permission of instructor or graduate standing. A graduate-level, in-department study of an individual philosopher, a particular philosophical problem or a narrowly defined period or school. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

PHIL 592. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; 1-4 credits. An independent study course to allow graduate students to do research, under the direction of a professor qualified in that field, in an area of major interest.

PHIL 601. Principles of Ethics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing. An examination of major ethical theories and their application to contemporary issues in medicine, science and public policy.

PHIL 602. Biomedical Ethics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An examination of ethical theory and its application to moral problems in medicine and biotechnology.

PHIL 635. Philosophy of the Social Sciences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A philosophical study of the nature of science and scientific explanation, with emphasis upon the social sciences. Topics include the philosophical analysis of objectivity in the social sciences, theories of human action and the relation of social sciences to the physical sciences.

PHIL 683. Administrative Ethics. 2,3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 or 3 lecture hours. 2 or 3 credits. A philosophical investigation into the problems of making ethical decisions, focusing on issues likely to confront the public administrator. Examples of such issues are equity in social services delivery, affirmative action, loyalty to the bureaucracy vs. "whistle blowing," and conflicts of interest between personal and public interest. Crosslisted as: PADM 683/GVPA 683.

PHIL 691. Topics in Philosophy. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-4 credits. Prerequisite: written permission of instructor or graduate standing. A graduate-level, in-depth study of an individual philosopher, a particular philosophical problem, or a narrowly defined period or school. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

PHIL 692. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-4 credits. Open to graduate students only. An independent study course to allow graduate students to do research, under the direction of a professor qualified in that field, in an area of major interest.

PHIL 713. Ethics and Public Policy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Doctoral students only. An examination of the main theories of morality and justice. These theories' implications for public policy will be discussed. Crosslisted as: PPAD 713.

Physics (PHYS)

PHYS 508. The Physical Science of Space for Teachers. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisites: B.S. or B.A. degree with at least two mathematics and two science courses or permission of instructor. The course is designed for the secondary physical science and physics teachers. The physical science phenomena of the solar system and the universe: mechanics, electromagnetism, optics and energy are presented for the teacher. The course curriculum closely follows the Virginia Science Standards of Learning for Physics and Physical Science. The course makes use of the Virginia Science Museum's interactive physical science exhibit galleries (aerospace, force and motion, waves and patterns, light and vision matter, crystals and electromagnetism as well as the Digistar planetarium and telescopes).

PHYS 509. Experiencing Science for Teachers. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: B.S. or B.A. degree with at least two mathematics and two science courses or permission of instructor. Designed to give physical science and physics teachers an understanding of the methods and processes actually used by scientists in different disciplines. Students repeat classic experiments, read from original works, keep detailed research journals, participate in laboratory experiments, engage in the peer review process and present results of projects in colloquium format. The course meets at the Science Museum of Virginia and uses the interactive science exhibits; visits to science sites in the area.

PHYS 510. Physical Science Demonstrations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisite: PHYS 509 or permission of instructor. The course is designed to give the working secondary physical science and physics teacher a depth of experience in designing and effectively using experiments to interpret phenomena for students. Participants learn the essentials of developing effective apparatus for investigations, interactive exhibits and demonstrations in the physical sciences. Students will undertake and present a major project as part of the course.

PHYS 514. Modeling Biocomplexity. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2.5 lecture and .5 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: one year of calculus. Introduction to the modeling and simulation of the behavior of complex biological systems, including models in both continuous and discrete time. Numerical methods using mathematica, analytical methods using calculus and laboratory experiments using computer interfaces will be used to study population dynamics and the behavior of physiological systems exhibiting such properties as oscillations and chaotic biological dynamics. Crosslisted as: BNFO 514.

PHYS 522. Optics and Laser Physics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PHYS 376 or permission of instructor. The purpose of this course is to introduce a range of topics from optics and the principles of laser operation. Topics include waves, physical optics, geometric optics, superposition, interference, polarization, diffraction, Fourier optics, coherence, lasers, second quantization.

PHYS 550. Techniques in Material Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 4 laboratory and 2 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PHYS 450 or graduate standing. This course focuses on the application of modern characterization techniques in materials research. Techniques to be studied include high-resolution X-ray diffraction, low-energy electron diffraction, light-energy electron diffraction, scanning-tunneling microscopy, molecular beam epitaxy, Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy.

PHYS 571. Theoretical Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHYS 376 and PHYS 380, or graduate standing. An introduction to advanced dynamics involving the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms.

PHYS 573. Analytical Methods in Physics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHYS 376 and PHYS 380, or graduate standing. Theoretical and numerical techniques in solving differential equations in condensed matter. Classification of electronic states in solids and clusters using groups, infinite series approximations, calculus of residues and causality.

PHYS 576. Electromagnetic Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PHYS 571. Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism, vector and scalar potentials, electromagnetic waves and radiation theory.

PHYS 580. Quantum Mechanics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PHYS 571. Theoretical quantum descriptions with emphasis upon mathematical techniques. Schrodinger equation, hydrogen atom, eigenfunctions and eigenvalues, angular momentum and spin and perturbation theory.

PHYS 583. Geometrical Methods of Physics and Gravitation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHYS 571 and PHYS 573 or permission of instructor. Introduction to the language of differential geometry that is needed for research in gravitation and cosmology. Topics include tensors, connections on manifolds, gauge-invariant field theories and Einstein’s theory of general relativity. Examples include black holes and cosmological solutions of Einstein’s field equations.

PHYS 591. Topics in Physics. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Open to graduate students and to undergraduate students with advanced standing. An in-depth study of a selected topic in advanced physics. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester and prerequisites. Applicable toward physics major requirements.

PHYS 640. Equilibrium Statistical Physics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHYS 571 and PHYS 580. Fundamentals of equilibrium statistical physics. Topics include review of thermodynamics, canonical and grand canonical partition functions, mean-field theories, Ising and Bragg-Williams models, Landau theory, fluctuations about the mean field, critical phenomena, exact solution to the one-dimensional Ising model, two-dimensional Ising model and the renormalization group.

PHYS 641. Solid State Physics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHYS 571 and PHYS 580. Study of structure and electronic properties of materials in the solid phase.

PHYS 650. Subatomic Physics I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHYS 576, PHYS 580 and CHEM 510. Studies of nuclei and elementary particles, reaction dynamics, particle accelerators, detection devices, particle classification, symmetries and conservation laws, quantum electrodynamics, the weak interaction, quantum chromodynamics, unified theories, the nuclear shell model and collective model, and nuclear reactions. Offered in cooperation with Virginia State University.

PHYS 651. Subatomic Physics II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisite: PHYS 650. A continuation of PHYS 650. Offered in cooperation with Virginia State University.

PHYS 661. Surface and Materials Physics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHYS 641, CHEM 510 or permission of instructor. This course will focus on the physics of surface, interfacial and other nanostructured material systems, and the experimental techniques used to assay their geometric and electronic properties. Topics include ultra-high vacuum techniques and design, surface geometric and electronic structure, adsorbates on surfaces and interface formation, thin film growth, and layered systems. Characterization techniques to be discussed include geometric probes (STM, AFM, RHEED, LEED, AFM, XRD) and synchrotron radiation-based electronic structure probes (PES, SXF, NEXAFS).

PHYS 663. Studies in Nuclear Physics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Credits for only two televised courses will count toward degree requirements. Courses televised by the Virginia Cooperative Graduate Engineering Program. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester and prerequisites.

PHYS 670. Conceptual Physics for Teachers I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 4 studio hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHYS 508, PHYS 509 and PHYS 510, or permission of instructor. First of the sequence 670-672. Development of the methodology for the experimental design at middle and high school level, concentrating on the science of measurement, materials structure and characterization, and light and optical properties of matter. The 670-672 sequence uses and develops computer-based experiments and interactive multimedia materials for use in the classroom. The course contains examples of vertical integration of technological applications of physical principles across disciplines.

PHYS 671. Conceptual Physics for Teachers II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 4 studio hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PHYS 670 or permission of instructor. Second of the sequence PHYS 670-672. Development of the methodology for experimental design at middle and high school level, concentrating on sound and acoustics, electromagnetism and classical mechanics.

PHYS 672. Conceptual Physics for Teachers III. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 4 studio hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PHYS 671 or permission of instructor. Third of the sequence PHYS 670-672. Development of the methodology for the experimental design at middle and high school level, concentrating on heat, thermodynamics and modern physics.

PHYS 690. Research Seminar. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 credit. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. Examines current problems and developments in physics.

PHYS 691. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisites: at least one graduate-level physics course and permission of instructor. Selected topics in physics from such areas as statistical physics, quantum field theory, semi-conductor device physics, general relativity, electronic structure of solids, thin-film fabrication techniques, superconductivity, nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, crystallography and nuclear physics.

PHYS 697. Directed Research. 1-15 Hours.

Semester course; 1-15 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: at least one graduate-level physics course and permission of instructor. Research leading to the M.S. or Ph.D. degree.

Political Science (POLI)

POLI 591. Topics in Political Science. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. An in-depth study of a selected topic in political science in a seminar environment. Intended for small groups of students interested in examining issues and problems related to aspects of the political processes.

Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 601. Foundations of Applied Developmental Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in the psychology program or permission of instructor. An introduction to developmental research and theory on applied research topics. Topics include ethical issues in applied developmental science, culture, ethnicity and child development, poverty, child abuse, nontraditional families, childcare, family instability, early childhood intervention and parenting.

PSYC 602. Psychology of Aging. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. Enrollment requires permission of instructor. Students must complete social sciences research methods before taking this course.Psychological adjustment in late life; special emphasis on personality, cognitive and emotional development; life crises associated with the aging process. Crosslisted as: GRTY 602.

PSYC 603. Developmental Processes. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Cognitive, social, personality and behavioral development across the life span is considered, with special attention to theories of development.

PSYC 604. Social Psychology of Business and Industry. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 630 or permission of instructor. The theme is the influence of organizational structure on behavior. Topics will include motivation, attitudes, job satisfaction, morale, leadership and supervision.

PSYC 605. Social Development. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 603 or permission of instructor. The development of social relations, focusing primarily on infancy and childhood, but also considering adulthood and aging. Attachment, parent-child interaction, peers, siblings, aggression, sex-roles, cultural determinants, deprivation and remediation, social cognition, adulthood changes, parenthood. Critical evaluation of theory and current research.

PSYC 606. Development in Middle Childhood. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in the psychology program or permission of instructor. An introduction to theory and research on children during middle childhood. Topics include language, intelligence, early education, schooling, social cognition, theory of mind, attachment, social competence, emotions and socialization.

PSYC 607. Advanced Educational Psychology for Elementary Teachers. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Application of the principles of psychology to the teaching-learning process in the elementary classroom. Discussion will focus on the comprehensive development of individual learning experiences and educational programs from the point of view of the educator and administrator. Crosslisted as: EDUS 607.

PSYC 608. Research in Counseling Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the counseling psychology program or permission of counseling committee. An introduction to the theoretical, procedural, methodological and ethical issues encountered during the conduct of empirical research in counseling psychology. Topics include the empirical analysis of such mainstream counseling research activities as assessment, interventions, consultation, supervision, training, psychosocial factors in health and prevention, career development, the study of diversity and underrepresented populations, and professional issues in counseling psychology.

PSYC 609. Contemporary Issues in Clinical Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: first-year graduate standing in clinical psychology or permission of the instructor. Informs first-year doctoral students of the philosophy behind the training model and the requirements of the doctoral program in clinical psychology in the context of the current status of contemporary issues in the field. Includes coverage of traditional and innovative training models, research issues, the role of assessment and psychotherapy in clinical psychology, the medical vs. the behavioral model of psychopathology, relations with other mental health professions, professional issues such as licensure and credentialing, and malpractice.

PSYC 610. Attitude Theory and Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Theory and research in attitudes. Attitude formation and change, including cognitive consistency, learning and reinforcement, social judgment, and functional theories.

PSYC 611. Contemporary Issues, Supervision and Leadership in Counseling Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Contemporary issues, problems and research related to the practice of counseling psychology; their importance in developing a professional identity and sensitivity to major developments in the field; history, present status and future directions in the field of counseling psychology.

PSYC 612. Seminar in Motivation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A survey of some theoretical views of motivation. Biological, cultural personality and learning theories of motivation will be covered. Theoretical positions will be related to current empirical findings.

PSYC 613. Cognitive Development. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/discussion hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology or permission of instructor. The development of the intellectual processes, including reasoning, memory, imagery and knowledge. Special attention will be given to theories of cognitive growth. Although the focus will be on child cognitive developments, consideration of life-span issues will be included.

PSYC 614. Development in Infancy and Early Childhood. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 603 or permission of instructor. An introduction to theory and research on children from birth to early childhood, including sensory and behavioral capacities; cognitive, social and emotional development; and contexts of development (especially the family). Emphasis on stage1salient tasks of development and the effects of early experience on function later in life. Consideration of the challenges associated with research and intervention with these age groups.

PSYC 615. Aging and Mental Disorders. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The course deals with common psychological disorders and problems of late life, their etiology, methods of evaluating psychological status and intervention strategies that have been used successfully with older persons. Topics include epidemiology of psychological disorders and mental health service utilization; late-life stressors and crises; psychology of health, illness and disability; techniques and procedures in the evaluation of the older adult; functional and organic disorders; institutionalization; individual, group and family therapy; behavioral techniques; peer counseling and crisis intervention; and drugs and the elderly. Crosslisted as: GRTY 615.

PSYC 616. Psychopathology. 1,3 Hour.

Semester course; variable hours. 1 or 3 credits. May be taken only one time for credit toward degree. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Clinical and experimental contributions to the field of psychopathology, with particular attention to the roles of learning and motivation in the development of behavior disorders.

PSYC 617. Sensation and Perception. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The major phenomena of vision, audition, olfaction, gustation and the skin senses. Psychophysics and the effects of sensory deficits. The relationship of variations in environmental energy to the psychological reactions of sensing and perceiving.

PSYC 618. Seminar in Personality. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A detailed exploration of various approaches in personality. Contemporary issues in personality theory.

PSYC 619. Learning and Cognition. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology or permission of instructor. Covers principles and theories of learning and cognitive psychology from simple associative learning through memory, comprehension, thinking and social behavior.

PSYC 620. Design and Analysis of Psychological Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: undergraduate course in basic statistics or permission of instructor. An introduction to research design in psychology (e.g., logic behind various research designs, typical research problems). Review of principles of hypothesis testing, general linear model, analysis of variance including factorial designs with special emphasis on prior and post-hoc comparisons, repeated-measures designs and mixed designs.

PSYC 622. Physiological Correlates of Emotion. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Research and theories of emotion emphasizing physiological bases, with special attention to neurological and endocrine systems. Applications to psychological functioning.

PSYC 623. Counseling Theories and Personality. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Enrollment requires permission of instructor. Overview of major trends in personality theory, techniques and current research in psychotherapies as they apply to counseling psychology. Includes descriptions of some brief psychoeducation and preventive interventions and stresses accountability in outcome of all interventions.

PSYC 624. Group Counseling and Psychotherapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Historical perspective. Basic dynamics and processes of therapeutic groups. Role and technique of the group facilitator. Examination of different theoretical approaches.

PSYC 625. Career Development and Occupational Health. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A review of major theories and current research in career development and topics in occupational health are presented. Theory, research and techniques associated with vocational assessment and intervention are reviewed. Emphasis on late adolescent and adult populations.

PSYC 626. Single-case Experimental Design for the Clinical Research Practitioner. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Review of single-case design models that have utility for clinicians in evaluating their practice. Emphasis will be placed on the historical development of the field and on the main experimental design issues that are relevant to the conduct of single-case research.

PSYC 627. Research Methods in Clinical Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 680 and graduate standing in clinical or counseling psychology, or permission of instructor. Examines the role of research in clinical psychology and experimental design issues in psychotherapy research.

PSYC 628. Psychology of Adolescence. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology or permission of instructor. Theories and research on the social, personality and cognitive development of adolescents. Emphasis is placed on the development of identity and relationships with family and peers, within the contexts of home, school, work and community. Variations in development related to cultural differences will also be the focus, but atypical behavior will be explored. Normal adolescent behavior will also be addressed. Current research ideas will be examined.

PSYC 629. Biological Basis of Behavior. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: an undergraduate course in physiological psychology or permission of instructor. Theory and current experimental research on the physiological and neurological concomitants of behavioral variables.

PSYC 630. Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Topics include attitudes, social influence processes, person perception, affiliation and attraction, group processes, cultural influences on behavior and conformity.

PSYC 631. Evaluation Research: Psychological Perspectives. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides the student with knowledge of and skills in evaluation research. Additionally, students will learn how to apply psychological theories and applied research methods in evaluating psychological interventions and treatment programs. The class covers several key aspects of evaluation: 1) use of psychological theory in evaluations, 2) defining the problem, 3) contextual issues surrounding the evaluation, 4) selecting the appropriate type and design of evaluation, 5) methodological issues and 6) steps involved in conducting an evaluation of process and outcome. Course will attend to: a) theoretical, b) political, social and contextual factors that impact an evaluation, c) cultural considerations when conducting an evaluation, d) practical and logistical considerations and e) effective collaboration with community partners. Course examples and materials will be drawn from the professor's experiences with evaluating community-based psychological interventions and prevention programs and the experiences of guest presenters.

PSYC 632. Research Methods in Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PSYC 680 and PSYC 630. Epistemological, methodological, technical and ethical problems encountered during the scientific study of social psychological phenomena. Emphasizes practical experience in theory development, hypothesis derivation, research planning, data collection, reduction and analysis, and dissemination strategies.

PSYC 633. Group Dynamics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 630 or permission of instructor. Theoretical explanations and empirical research related to group formation, development, performance and dissolution. Topics include obedience, conformity, group productivity and leadership.

PSYC 634. Attribution and Social Cognition. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 630. Analysis of the perceptual and inferential processes that influence the perceiver's understanding of others' traits and characteristics. Examines theoretical perspectives and current empirical studies of the intuitive use of behavioral data in making inferences concerning the causes of actions and events and the cognitive mechanisms that structure inferences about others' qualities.

PSYC 635. Psychology of Health and Health Care in the Elderly. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Presents health psychology models, theories and issues relating to the etiology, course and treatment of illness in the elderly. Covers older patient-practitioner interaction, compliance, late-life stress and illness, and psychosocial issues in terminal care.

PSYC 636. Research Methods in Developmental Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 680. Research designs, methods, ethical issues and problems specific to developmental psychology. Cross-sectional, longitudinal and sequential strategies. Statistical issues, multivariate statistics and choice of statistical designs appropriate for developmental research questions. Computer skills in organizing and analyzing data. Grant writing and scientific reporting.

PSYC 637. Operant Behavior. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology or permission of instructor. Presents an overview of the methodology, terminology and phenomena unique to the experimental analysis of behavior. Topics include operant methodology, schedules of reinforcement, stimulus control, acquisition of behavior, conditioned reinforcement, punishment, scheduled-induced behaviors and use of operant techniques in drug research.

PSYC 638. The Evolution of Psychological Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: core course in student's area of specialization or permission of instructor. A survey of the development and present state of various psychological systems. Current meta-theoretical and systematic issues in psychology.

PSYC 639. Research Methods in Biopsychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 4 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Methodological, technical and ethical problems in biopsychology. Examples are design and use of circuits in behavioral sciences, stereotaxic surgery, histology, drug procedures, research design, data collection procedures and data analysis.

PSYC 640. Parenting. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is about parenting. Students review and discuss theories and literature on human parenting, including the history of parenting, contextual issues in parenting, parenting at different stages of children's lives (from pregnancy and infancy through having adult children) and parenting children with special needs (including disabilities and behavior problems). Also covers parent training and education, the journey to becoming a parent through adoption, parenting contributions to social, emotional and cognitive competence, child maltreatment and public policy around parenting. Students review parenting in different family structures including married, never married, divorced and separated families. This is not a course on how to parent, but practical issues in the lives of parents are discussed.

PSYC 641. Survey of Psychological Assessment and Treatment of the Older Adult. 3 Hours.

3 credits. A combination didactic and skills training course; review of major treatment strategies and techniques for utilization with the older adult client with emphasis on group, individual and paraprofessional delivery systems; evaluation of crisis intervention and consultation team approaches; lectures, demonstration and classroom practice of actual treatment techniques. Crosslisted as: GRTY 641.

PSYC 642. Practicum in Clinical Geropsychology. 3 Hours.

3 credits. An initial practicum geared as an entry to the team practicum experience; focus on familiarizing the student with mental health service delivery systems for the elderly in the Richmond community; rotation through a limited number of facilities such as nursing homes, retirement centers, nutrition sites, emergency hotline services for the elderly and various agencies involved in deinstitutionalization; possible extended placement in a particular facility. Crosslisted as: GRTY 642.

PSYC 643. Principles of Psychological Measurement. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology or permission of instructor. Basic psychometric concepts to prepare the student for subsequent evaluation instruments. Origins and logic of testing, criteria for judging tests, standardization and reliability, and validity and principles of test development and construction.

PSYC 644. Individual Tests of Intelligence. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in clinical or counseling psychology or permission of counseling or clinical psychology program. Examines the administration, scoring, interpretation and research foundations of the major individual tests of intelligence. Emphasizes the Wechsler scales and the measurement of adult and child intelligence. Develops psychological report writing skills.

PSYC 645. Assessment of Personality. 2,3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 2 or 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in clinical or counseling psychology, or permission of clinical or counseling psychology program and instructor. Examines use of objective and projective tests in assessment of personality. Emphasizes clinical interpretation of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI), and the administration and clinical interpretation of the Rorschach and Thematic Apperception Test (TAT). Stresses integrative report writing.

PSYC 646. Projective Techniques. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in clinical or counseling psychology or permission of counseling and clinical program committee. Projective devices for the assessment of personality. Supervised administration, scoring, interpretation and written reports of individually administered projective personality tests.

PSYC 647. Neuropsychological Assessment. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology and permission of instructor. Psychological assessment of brain-behavior relationships in the context of neurological or neurosurgical problems. Emphasis is on current modifications of Halstead's tests and on the Reitan-Indiana Neuropsychological Battery for younger children. Laboratory requires supervised administration, scoring and interpretations of neuropsychological test batteries.

PSYC 648. Behavioral Assessment of Clinical Problems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology and permission of instructor. Development, evaluation, use and interpretation of behavioral approaches to the assessment of clinical problems, including self-monitoring, behavioral ratings and direct observational assessment procedures. Both existing instruments and procedures for designing new instruments will be discussed.

PSYC 649. Clinical Assessment of Child Disorders. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PSYC 643 and graduate standing in clinical psychology, or permission of clinical program committee and instructor. Administration and interpretation of intellectual and personality assessment instruments for children. Laboratory requires supervised administration, scoring, interpretation and written reports of these assessment instruments.

PSYC 650. Advanced Child Psychopathology. 1,3 Hour.

Semester course; variable hours. 1 or 3 credits. May be taken only one time for credit toward degree. Principal childhood behavioral abnormalities: mental retardation, psychosis, learning disabilities, speech and language problems, school-related behavioral problems, neurosis, psychosomatic disorders and juvenile delinquency. Genetic, prenatal, perinatal, postnatal and social-psychological factors related to etiology. Integration of assessment and treatment methods.

PSYC 651. Theories of Counseling and Interviewing. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1, 2 or 3 credits. Prerequisites: graduate standing in counseling or clinical psychology, and permission of instructor. Introduces basic principles of interviewing as they apply to theories and practice of psychotherapy and counseling. Laboratory requires videotaping of simulated counseling/psychotherapy session, modeled and role-played interviewing situation, skill development and demonstration, and evaluative interpersonal feedback.

PSYC 652. Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology and permission of the instructor. Presents the major approaches to psychological interventions for children's and adolescents' behavioral and emotional disorders. Includes a review of empirical research evaluating the effectiveness of contemporary psychological interventions for specific disorders.

PSYC 653. Family Counseling and Therapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PSYC 616, and PSYC 693 or PSYC 694, and PSYC 645; or permission of instructor. Emphasizes an applied approach to family assessment and therapy. Presents theories and concepts of major approaches to family therapy and general systems issues. Emphasizes techniques of family therapy. Involves participants in role playing, demonstration, films and case discussion.

PSYC 654. Marriage Counseling and Therapy: Theory, Practice and Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in clinical or counseling psychology, or permission of instructor. Surveys major theories of marital interaction and counseling (as distinct from family counseling). Students perform assessment batteries and interviews and practice selected techniques of marital counseling. Participation in a research project, either library, field, or experimental research, is required.

PSYC 655. Community Interventions: Development, Implementation and Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Provides an understanding of the concepts community, prevention and promotion and how interventions that adopt such a perspective differ from traditional psychotherapeutic interventions in their goals and targets. Explores how to critically evaluate research related to community and preventive interventions. Emphasizes consideration of issues in designing, implementing and evaluating community intervention projects. Provides opportunities to conduct part of the intervention in a community setting.

PSYC 656. Structured Training Groups. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. This course presents an introduction to the historical roots and basic assumptions of group training methods. The specific focus is on those structured, behavioral interventions that are designed to be time limited and emphasize staff development or training needs of clients. Needs assessment, screening, program development and evaluation, consultation methods and ethics are included as topics. Leadership styles and the composition of training grant proposals are developed and critiqued in the laboratory/experiential component of this course.

PSYC 657. Advanced Educational Psychology for Secondary Teachers. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Application of the principles of psychology to the teaching-learning process in the secondary classroom. Discussion will focus on the comprehensive development of individual learning experiences and educational programs from the point of view of the educator and administrator. Crosslisted as: EDUS 617.

PSYC 659. Seminar in Consultation Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology or permission of instructor. Explores theory and practice of psychological consultation using case materials, readings and individualized projects. Covers conceptual models and role choices available to the consulting psychologist, common phases, principles and practices found in the consultation process and program evaluation and consultation research methods and issues.

PSYC 660. Health Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PSYC 629 and graduate standing in psychology, or permission of instructor. Provides an overview of research in and applications of the principles of behavioral psychology with respect to the fields of medicine, health maintenance and illness. Emphasizes the integration of theoretical research and applied issues in these areas. Surveys major topics in behavioral medicine, including psychophysiological disorders, compliance and adherence with health care regimens, psychological adjustment to illness and pain, behavioral dentistry, pediatric psychology, cardiovascular risk reduction, eating and sleeping disorders, behavioral pharmacology and biofeedback. Explores roles of psychologists.

PSYC 661. Clinical Applications of Health Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Clinical health psychology has emerged as a distinct practice area within professional psychology. It is best defined as the application of psychological assessment and intervention methods to various specialty areas within medicine. These areas include rehabilitation medicine, neurology, geriatrics, transplant medicine, bariatrics, oncology, cardiology, pain management, sleep medicine, reproductive health, pediatrics, gastroenterology and primary care. The course will survey the clinical roles of and intervention and assessment tools used within each of these specialty areas, and will include guest lectures provided by clinicians who work in these specialty areas from the VCU Health System or the larger community. In addition, students will conduct information-gathering telephone interviews with clinicians from around the nation and present their findings in a discussion format. Course evaluation will be based primarily on class discussion, student presentations of interviews and two take-home exams.

PSYC 662. Diagnostic and Behavioral Assessment. 2,3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 2 or 3 credits. Designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of diagnostic and behavioral assessment. The course primarily focuses on the conceptual underpinnings and major methods associated with the diagnostic and behavioral assessment traditions. Emphasis is placed on how these assessment traditions can be used together to guide case conceptualization, monitor treatment progress and outcome, treatment planning, and treatment selection. The course covers psychometric theory, classics assessment controversies and the psychometric strengths and weaknesses of the diagnostic and behavioral assessment approaches. The course ends with a review of risk assessment. The goal of the course is to provide students with the knowledge and skills to critically apply the appropriate assessment strategies to guide clinical work from intake to termination.

PSYC 664. Psychological Needs of Military Service Members and Their Families. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Provides opportunities to understand the psychological needs of both service members and their families -- from pre-deployment through post-deployment -- through presentations by professionals from the Department of Defense, National Guard, VA Medical Center and other military organizations. Explores the impact of psychological trauma and physical injuries on service members' well-being. Emphasizes a review of different interventions and other sources of help available for returning service members and their families. Provides an opportunity to prepare an integrative review of a topic related to a military issue.

PSYC 665. Psychodynamic Approaches to Psychological Treatment. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Examines basic principles in conceptualizing and treating clients from a psychodynamic perspective. Theoretical and clinical readings and case materials are used as a basis for an in-depth analysis of psychodynamic theories and practices within a seminar format.

PSYC 666. Crisis Intervention: Theory, Research and Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology or permission of instructor. Review of the development of the concept of psychological crisis and of intervention programs in a range of areas such as sexual assault, natural disasters, telephone hotlines and medical emergencies. Relevant theory and data from community psychology, laboratory and applied research, sociology and psychiatry will be considered.

PSYC 667. Behavior Therapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in the psychology program or permission of instructor. Emphasizes group and individual approaches to the following general areas: observational techniques; counterconditioning and extinction procedures; techniques of positive and negative control; self-control procedures; use of modeling and role playing as change techniques; behavioral feedback and cueing procedures.

PSYC 668. Interpersonal Psychotherapy: Social Psychological Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Analysis of counseling and psychotherapy as interpersonal influence processes. Applications of social psychological theories and research to the process of therapeutic change; identification of key aspects of the change process and of how these aspects are embodied in current approaches and techniques of counseling and psychotherapy. Emphasis on experimental methods of studying change processes.

PSYC 669. Interpersonal Psychotherapy: Communication Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Theory and research in nonverbal communication. Communication theories of psychotherapy and a communication analysis of key concepts in psychotherapy.

PSYC 670. Seminar in Gestalt Therapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Philosophical basis, historical background, theoretical formulation, techniques and application of Gestalt therapy. Students will have the opportunity to practice and observe the techniques.

PSYC 671. Readings and Research. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisite: written permission of instructor. Individual study leading to the investigation of a particular problem in a systematic fashion under the supervision of a member of the faculty.

PSYC 675. Ethical Principles of Psychology. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. A discussion of some of the current problems of interest to psychologists. Particular emphasis on the ethical principles of psychology, and the dilemmas encountered in the teaching, research and applied practice of psychology.

PSYC 676. Personal Awareness in Multicultural Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 seminar hours and 1 hour skills-building component. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in the counseling psychology doctoral program or permission of the instructor. Focus on (1) self-awareness regarding cultural issues, (2) knowledge of cultural differences and (3) counseling skills with culturally different clients. This course will provide the theoretical and research knowledge base to complement students' experiential training in multicultural issues. Building on the students' knowledge of Western and non-Western psychology theories and practices, the course will help students in developing a theory of cross-cultural and multicultural counseling. The course will further focus on historical development of multiculturalism and examine existing research in this area.

PSYC 677. Minority Issues in Mental Health. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing in psychology or permission of instructor. Presents an overview of issues pertaining to the mental health of visual racial/ethnic groups (VREG) in the United States (i.e., African-Americans, Hispanics, Asian-Americans and Native Americans). Topic areas include research and psychological theories, assessment, diagnosis, ethnic identity acculturation, service utilization, the family, psychotherapy and training issues.

PSYC 679. Culture, Ethnicity and Health. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Enrollment restricted to graduate students in health psychology or by permission of instructor. This course is designed to provide students with a foundation for understanding and addressing health disparities from a psychological perspective. The class will focus on: (a) health disparities from a historical, political, economic, social and environmental perspective; (b) the intersection of race, ethnicity, gender, socio-economic status, sexual orientation and other social factors that may exacerbate disparities; (c) challenges in the measurement of minority health and health disparities; (d) the role of cultural competence in health promotion and disease prevention; and (e) barriers to health care that contribute to disparities.

PSYC 680. Statistics in Psychological Research I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: an undergraduate psychological statistics course or equivalent within the past three years or successful passage (80 percent or greater) of an undergraduate psychological statistics equivalency test to be completed at VCU. Extensive coverage of multiple regression/correlation analysis with applications in psychology. Survey of applications of multivariate statistical analyses in psychology.

PSYC 681. Statistics in Psychological Research II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 680 or permission of instructor. Will build on PSYC 680 and provide extensive coverage of multiple regression/correlation analysis with applications in psychology. Will provide a survey of applications of multivariate statistical analyses in psychology and will introduce students to recent statistical develpments in the field.

PSYC 688. The Self and Identity. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PSYC 630 and 680 or permission of instructor. Our sense of self provides meaning and coherence to our lives; it is the lens through which we interpret the world. This seminar will take a research-based approach, and almost all readings will be psychology journal articles. Class will focus on key topics in recent self research (e.g., self-regulation, self-esteem, the self and relationships, different cultural conceptions of self) as well as debate controversial issues in the literature (e.g., the cultural universality of self-enhancement, whether positive illusions are healthy). Students may choose some of the topics covered in the latter part of the semester. Evaluation will be based primarily on class discussion, student-led debates and discussions, and a research proposal and presentation at the end of the semester.

PSYC 690. Research Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 4 hours per credit. 1-3 credits. Available to graduate students in the psychology department with approval by their program committee. Provides the graduate student in psychology the opportunity to design and apply research skills under close faculty supervision. Involves research projects that progressively become more sophisticated as students increase their research skills.

PSYC 691. Special Topics. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Theory, research and techniques in specialized topics of current interest are presented.

PSYC 693. Counseling Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; one-half day per credit. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Available only to graduate students in counseling psychology approved by the counseling program committee. A series of training experiences designed to facilitate progressively greater degrees of skill development in counseling psychology.

PSYC 694. Clinical Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; one-half day per credit. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Available only to graduate students in clinical psychology approved by the clinical program committee. The graduate student in clinical psychology is given an opportunity to apply and practice interviews and diagnostic and therapeutic skills with clients requiring psychological services. Careful supervision and evaluation of the student is provided. The practicum may be located at a clinic on campus or in a hospital or other agency off campus.

PSYC 695. Practicum in Clinical or Counseling Supervision. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 4 supervisory hours. 2 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Credits earned do not count as course credits toward the degree. Prerequisites: permission of instructor, enrollment in graduate program in clinical or counseling psychology, completion of 12 hours of clinical (PSYC 694) or counseling (PSYC 693) practicum. This course is an opportunity to develop, apply and practice psychotherapy supervision skills under the direct supervision of clinical or counseling faculty members.

PSYC 696. Internship. 0.5 Hours.

0.5 credit. Prerequisite: approval of the director of the program involved. The internship is one-year, full-time assignment, under supervision, to an agency approved by the student's program committee. Graded S/U/F.

PSYC 700. Grant Writing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: two graduate courses in statistics or permission of instructor. Students are expected to enter course with a pre-approved topic identified and substantial background reading completed. Focuses on preparing an NIH grant application, using F31-F32 mechanism (predoctoral or postdoctoral National Research Service Award) as a model. Course covers elements of a grant application, details of the grant review process and key features of successful applications. Students prepare a research plan for their own application based upon their current work.

PSYC 702. Causal Analysis for Organizational Studies. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: two graduate courses in statistics or permission of instructor. Focuses on conceptual and statistical issues involved with causal analysis with nonexperimental and experimental data. Course covers basic and advanced confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation techniques, with an emphasis on organizational and psychological applications. Crosslisted as: MGMT 702.

PSYC 795. Practicum in the Teaching of College Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. May be repeated. Prerequisites: appointment as a graduate teaching assistant in psychology or permission of instructor. Students develop skills in the design and conduct of undergraduate courses in psychology through observation and supervised experiences: acquaints students with university, college, and department policies and resources in support of instruction; familiarizes students with disciplinary resources; assists students in evaluating personal strengths and weaknesses.

PSYC 798. M.S. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

1-6 credits. May be repeated.

PSYC 898. Doctoral Dissertation. 1-12 Hours.

1-12 credits. May be repeated.

Rehabilitation and Movement Science (REMS)

REMS 540. Cardiovascular Pathophysiology and Pharmacology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: HPEX 375 and HPEX 440 or equivalents. Presents theoretical principles of electrocardiography and the effects of pharmacological intervention in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Specific emphasis placed on myocardial ischemia, myocardial infarction and their treatment through exercise rehabilitation protocols. The impact of pharmacological agents on the ECG and on exercise are explored. Crosslisted as: HEMS 540.

REMS 608. Advanced Musculoskeletal Sciences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines the structure and function of tissues of the musculoskeletal system. Investigates mechanisms of healing of these tissues and explores the affects of various modalities, altered use and disease on the structure and function of musculoskeletal tissues. Crosslisted as: PHTY 608.

REMS 611. Biomechanics of Human Motion. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 205 or equivalent. Recommended: PHYS 201, or HPEX 374 or 373, or equivalents. Application of the knowledge and methods of mechanics in the study of the structure and function of the human body as applied to sport, physical activity and rehabilitation. Topics include kinematics, kinetics and methods of biomechanical analysis. Crosslisted as: HEMS 611.

REMS 612. Advanced Biomechanics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: REMS/HEMS 611 or permission of instructor. Designed for students in the interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Rehabilitation and Movement Science. Covers advanced biomechanics techniques for the evaluation and quantification of human performance. Encourages scientific thought with practical applications. Crosslisted as: PHTY 612.

REMS 660. Neuromuscular Performance. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: HEMS/REMS 601 and HEMS 611. Examines the interrelationships between the musculoskeletal and neuromuscular systems. Includes examination of normal and abnormal biomechanics of the musculoskeletal system, biomechanical factors related to human performance, as well as acute and chronic adaptations of the neuromuscular system. Emphasizes how these principles can be applied to physical training in healthy and diseased populations and treatment and rehabilitation in the sports medicine setting. Crosslisted as: HEMS 660.

REMS 665. Instrumentation in Motion Analysis. 3 Hours.

2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Designed for students in the interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Rehabilitation and Movement Science Program. Examines theories, principles, and applications of systems used to qualify and characterize movement.

REMS 690. Research Seminar in Rehabilitation and Movement Science. 0.5 Hours.

Seminar course; 0.5 credit. Seminar course designed for students in the interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Rehabilitation and Movement Science Program. Presentation and discussion of research reports and topics of interest. Advances skills in critical analysis and discussion leadership. Topics and research presentations vary from semester to semester and are coordinated by the instructor of record. May be repeated. Graded as pass/fail.

REMS 692. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for 6 credits. Determination of the amount of credit and permission of the instructor and division head must be procured prior to registration. Cannot be used in place of existing courses. An individual study of a specialized issue or problem in health or movement sciences. Crosslisted as: HEMS 692.

REMS 701. Advanced Exercise Physiology I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PHIS 501 or other graduate-level mammalian physiology course or permission of instructor. Investigates the effect of acute and chronic exercise stimuli on human performance and select disease states. Topics to be addresses include exercise bioenergetics, metabolic responses to exercise, contributions to substrate selection and utilization during exercise, muscular performance and adaptations to exercise training, cardiovascular adaptation to exercise, aerobic and anaerobic training programs, and effects of training on fitness and performance.

REMS 702. Advanced Exercise Physiology II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHIS 501 or other graduate-level mammalian physiology course or permission of instructor, and REMS 701. Investigates the effect of physiological stressors on human performance and health through lecture and article discussion. Topics to be addressed include exercise in the heat and cold, effects of altitude on physical performance, acute and chronic endocrine responses to exercise, role of adipokines in chronic disease conditions, the use of ergogenic aids in sport.

REMS 703. Cardiovascular Exercise Physiology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment requires permission of instructor. Investigates the structural, functional and cellular principles of human cardiovascular physiology as applied to health and human performance. Emphasis will be placed on the metabolic, contractile and hemodynamic adaptations to acute and chronic exercise training.

REMS 704. Psychobiology of Physical Activity. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment requires permission of instructor. "Psychobiology" is defined as the integrative study of behavior from the social, cognitive and biological levels of analysis. This course will include an examination of the research that encompasses psychophysiology, psychoneuroendocrinology, psychoneuroimmunology, neuroscience, physiological psychology and behavioral genetics applied to exercise.

REMS 705. Metabolic Aspects of Physical Activity. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment requires permission of instructor. This course is designed to explore the thermic effects of physical activity in apparently healthy individuals, as well as those with increased risk for cardiovascular, metabolic or other inflammatory diseases. Additionally, the relationship between physical activity and food intake, resting metabolic rate and dietary-induced thermogenesis will be reviewed. The examination of gastrointestinal function during dietary manipulation will also be assessed to address performance enhancement in several types of physical activities. This course will emphasize the metabolic control of ATP synthesis, which includes carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism and their interaction with one another in response to biological needs during rest and physical activity.

REMS 710. Research Techniques in Rehabilitation and Movement Science. 1-3 Hours.

50 hours of laboratory times per credit hour. 1-3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required. Examines and explores laboratory techniques used in rehabilitation and movement science research. Provides opportunity to begin transitioning clinical problems to research questions. Opportunities in laboratories of the rehabilitation and movement science program or other laboratories approved by the adviser or program directors. Focuses on individual student learning needs. Graded as pass/fail.

REMS 793. Teaching Practicum in Higher Education. 1 Hour.

50 hours of contact/preparation time for each credit. 1 credit. Practicum designed for students in the interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Rehabilitation and Movement Science degree program. Develops skills necessary for classroom teaching including preparing and presenting selected topic (s), writing test questions, and grading examinations. May be repeated for additional teaching experience. Graded as pass/fail.

REMS 794. Research Presentation Seminar. 1 Hour.

1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Seminar course designed for students in the interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Rehabilitation and Movement Science Program. Develops presentation skills. Requires preparation and presentation of research at a public research forum scheduled by the instructor of record. Students are expected to submit their research for presentation at a selected regional, national or international conference in a related field. Graded as pass/fail.

REMS 798. Research in Rehabilitation and Movement Science. 1-12 Hours.

Semester course; 1-12 credits. Research leading to the Ph.D. degree and elective research projects for students in the Rehabilitation and Movement Science doctoral program. May be repeated. Graded as "S," "U" or "F.

Religious Studies (RELS)

RELS 592. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; 1-4 credits. Determination of the amount of credit and permission of the instructor and department chair must be procured prior to registration for the course. Open only to graduate students. An independent study course to allow qualified graduate students to do research in an area of major interest.

Sociology (SOCY)

SOCY 500. Advanced Principles of Sociology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A comprehensive analysis of the concepts and techniques useful for understanding society and culture as well as the social processes and structures operant within these spheres.

SOCY 501. The Foundations of Sociological Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The foundations of theoretical explanation of the social world is addressed from an historical and philosophical perspective. The emergence of contemporary sociological theory in the 19th and 20th centuries is reviewed.

SOCY 502. Contemporary Sociological Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A critical assessment is given of such contemporary theoretical orientations as functionalism, conflict theory, exchange theory, symbolic interactionism and phenomenology.

SOCY 508. Introduction to Social Statistics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Introduction to statistical methods applicable in a variety of settings, with emphasis on nonexperimental data. Data description and analysis including chi-square and t-tests, using a statistical computing package. Not applicable toward M.S. in Mathematical Sciences or Computer Science. Crosslisted as: STAT 508.

SOCY 510. Domestic and Sexual Violence in Social Context. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Students will learn about the experiences of and responses to sexual and domestic violence in specific social contexts, with a focus on less visible contexts and underserved populations. Examines violence within various family structures and intimate relationships including racial/ethnic minority and immigrant groups and gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender relationships, in various community settings including college campuses and the military, and among people with disabilities. Guest lectures provided by community experts in these areas.

SOCY 515. Globalization and Transformation: Concepts and Realities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines how globalization significantly affects cultural processes at both local and national levels. Transformations of cultural understandings and practices under such circumstances will be explored. Virtual course components will bring causes, processes and consequences of the transformations of Western, Eastern and developing countries into focus. Crosslisted as: INTL 500.

SOCY 524. Aging and the Minority Community. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An analysis of the relationship between the aging process and American minority communities. In addition to the sociological factors, the course will examine demographic, physiological and psychological aspects of minority aging. Attention will also focus on dominant social problems and federal policies toward the aged.

SOCY 593. Internship in Sexual and Domestic Violence Practice and Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 12 hours per week. 3 credits. Provides students practical experiences working in settings that address sexual and domestic violence. Students will focus on various areas including but not limited to service provision, intervention, research and program evaluation. Students will work closely with organizations/agency staff and follow their instructions.

SOCY 601. Sociological Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Review of sociological research methodologies, including research design, ethical issues, measurement, data collection techniques, sampling and the basic logic of qualitative and quantitative analysis.. The focus is on developing the student's abilities to critically evaluate uses of methodologies in the research literature and justify methodological choices.

SOCY 602. Applications of Sociological Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: SOCY/STAT 508 or equivalent and SOCY 601. Emphasis on applying methods for developing and executing a sociological research project, including the problem statement, theoretical framework, literature review, research design, ethics, sampling, data collection procedures, data analysis and presentation of results.

SOCY 603. Seminar in Population Studies. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Analysis of fertility, mortality and migration from a sociodemographic perspective. Special attention will be paid to sociological determinants of demographic processes and their interrelationships.

SOCY 604. Sociology of Work in Industry. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Analyses of work relations and the social structures and mechanisms that govern and arise out of them and examination of the social problems that are inherent in the characteristics that make a society an industrial society.

SOCY 605. Survey Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: SOCY 601, SOCY 602 and SOCY/STAT 608, or permission of instructor. Examines all major areas of survey research methodology including sampling, design, data collection methods, questionnaire design, data analysis and data processing. Addresses problems specific to survey research, such as telephone interviewing, constructing large representative samples and nonresponse rates. Crosslisted as: PADM 605.

SOCY 607. Seminar in Racial and Ethnic Relations in America. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of intergroup relations in such areas as busing and school desegregation, racism, minority and athletics, the emergence of white ethnic groups in the political systems, and the position of minorities in legal, economic and medical institutions.

SOCY 608. Statistics for Social Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: STAT/SOCY 508 or SOCY 214 or permission of instructor. Statistical methods applied in social research. Topics include analysis of variance, correlation and regression, including stepwise methods, and the analysis of discrete data. Study of a statistical package, emphasizing manipulation of survey data sets. Not applicable toward M.S. in Mathematical Sciences or Computer Science. Crosslisted as: STAT 608.

SOCY 609. Seminar in the Family. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Analysis of contemporary family life with an emphasis on the influence of social change. Consideration of current family crises and problems.

SOCY 610. Complex Organizations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of complex organizations in society with emphasis on the determinants and effects of organizational structure and process.

SOCY 611. Studies in the Community. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The organization of the community with emphasis on major trends in urban development and growth. The interdependence of political, social and economic geographic units. The need for cooperative planning and control.

SOCY 612. Seminar in the Sociology of Deviant Behavior. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The nature and functions of deviance. Theories and problems of social control.

SOCY 613. Social Stratification. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An in-depth analysis of status differentials in society (e.g., social class, prestige and power).

SOCY 614. Seminar in the Sociology of Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. A sociological analysis of education as a social institution with an emphasis on methodological issues and policy implications.

SOCY 615. Seminar in Mass Communications. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Some theoretical background in sociology is recommended. A sociological analysis of contemporary media and their interrelationships with social systems, media and national development. Special emphasis on media as instruments of social and cultural change.

SOCY 620. Seminar in Criminology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examination and analysis of social, psychological, and economic theories and correlates of criminal behavior. Typologies of offenders. Crosslisted as: CRJS 620.

SOCY 622. Theory Construction. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A consideration of recent social theorists in which emphasis is placed on the logic of theory construction.

SOCY 624. Community and Community Services for the Elderly. 3 Hours.

3 credits. A conceptual/theoretical overview of community focusing on the ecological, psychological and social dimensions of community and on communities of the aged. Crosslisted as: GRTY 624.

SOCY 625. Urban Sociology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing. A detailed analysis and examination of the social and ecological structures and processes of the modern city with primary emphasis on the macro-level organization of urban life.

SOCY 630. Social Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Discussion and investigation of selected social psychological issues in sociology, as well as traditional and innovative methodology applied to these issues.

SOCY 631. Battered Women in the Criminal Justice System. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides students with an understanding of (1) the major developments and trends in the law related to battered women in the criminal justice system; (2) the role of the various players in the criminal justice system; (3) how child abuse and sexual abuse are treated in the criminal justice system; and (4) battered women who kill and the defense of battered woman syndrome. Introduces the stages of the criminal justice system as it relates to battered women and their children.

SOCY 632. Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence: Medical Practice and Policy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides an overview of the sociological perspective on intimate partner and sexual violence as it relates to women’s health. Also covers practical responses to violence such as screening, assessment, treatment and referral behaviors of medical providers, as well as policy in the health care setting.

SOCY 633. Application of the Policy Process to Issues of Violence. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Offers an interdisciplinary approach to understanding different models of decision-making and the policy process found at all levels of American government. The focus is on the public sector with application to private and nonprofit settings. A six-stage model of policy initiation, selection, implementation, evaluation and termination is presented and explored through the use of case studies and examples of policy initiatives related to domestic violence, sexual assault and youth violence. Prepares students to recognize and understand the key stages of and influences on the policy process and apply them in their current and future work settings.

SOCY 634. Social Contexts of Childhood and Violence. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Course will increase awareness and knowledge of children and adolescents as victims of violence, “absorbers” of violence and perpetrators of violence, as well as the victim-perpetrator dichotomy. Course is informed by an interdisciplinary framework to include neuroscience, trauma-informed practice, socioecological model, child development and resiliency. Topics include children and adolescents’ experience with domestic violence, sexual violence, physical abuse, neglect, human trafficking, teen-dating violence, violence against LGBTQ youth, school violence, neighborhood/community violence and violence in the media. This highly interactive course will also consider innovative intervention and prevention strategies and discuss relevant policy issues.

SOCY 635. Theorizing Gender Violence. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Teaches students to think sociologically and structurally about gender and violence. Familiarizes students with sociological and feminist scholarship and explanatory theories related to preventing and responding to gender violence. Students will learn about the experiences of and responses to sexual and domestic violence in specific social contexts, with a focus on less visible and underserved populations. Guest lectures provided by community experts in these areas. Also examines social policy and research implications of various approaches.

SOCY 640. Seminar in Political Sociology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Analysis of structures and processes of political organization. Examination of the creation and management of power, diffusion and regulation of conflict, and the politics of modernization and bureaucratization.

SOCY 645. The Sociology of Health and Illness. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An examination of sociocultural factors in health and illness and the influence of social factors on recovery and rehabilitation. Special attention will be paid to the methodology found in current studies.

SOCY 646. Seminar in the Sociology of Mental Health and Disorder. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Seminar in social organizational causes of clinical depression, schizophrenia, neurosis and personality disorders. Focus is on prevention through social engineering and social policy. Impact of social change, sex roles and socialization processes on rates of mental disorder emphasized.

SOCY 650. Theories of Social and Institutional Change. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of social change with emphasis on institutional settings. Topics examined include alternative theoretical perspectives on change, structural sources of change, approaches to planned change, and the role and function of change agents.

SOCY 652. Environmental Sociology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Exploration of the social and political dimensions of human-environment relationships through the lens of environmental sociology and human geography. The course focuses on large-scale, planetary transformations often referred to as climate change, a diverse range of effects that are becoming increasingly salient parts of our everyday lives.

SOCY 654. Political Economy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A rigorous introduction to historical and theoretical modes of inquiry that are foundational to a wide range of critical sociology. An exploration of the major sociological paradigms for analyzing relations among state, economy and society. Topical focus will vary each term, but will include a critical evaluation of liberal political economy, an investigation of 20th century capitalism and the rise of neoliberalism, and the intersections of race, gender and class in the modern world-system.

SOCY 656. Social Network Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing or permission of instructor. Provides a solid introduction to the theoretical foundations, basic measures and common applications of Social Network Analysis. Begins with overview of what it means to practice SNA and discusses the implications and use of SNA as social science methodology. Using online discussions and standard SNA methodological tools, students will engage in peer discussions and complete a series of practica designed to introduce the SNA methodology. Course will also take a broad look at how SNA has been used in understanding social mobility, interpersonal violence and terrorism/gangs. By course end, students will have an understanding of the theories and basic measures and methods of SNA.

SOCY 660. Seminar in the Sociology of Gender. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An analysis of the social construction of gender, the social forces that create and maintain gender hierarchy, and how the gender hierarchy intersects with other systems of inequality such as race, class and sexuality.

SOCY 673. Public Sociology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides students an opportunity to reflect on public sociology and develop skills in disseminating their sociological insights to a broader public. Some of the major questions addressed include: What is public sociology? What/who is the sociological audience? What is the relationship between academia and public intellectual life? How does the internet influence the availability of publics? How does style of writing determine our relationship to different publics?.

SOCY 690. Practicum in the Teaching of College Sociology. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 credit. Enables students to develop skills in the design and conduct of undergraduate courses in sociology through observation and supervised experiences. Credits not applicable toward the B.S. in Sociology.

SOCY 691. Special Topics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Seminars on current specialized areas of sociological and anthropological interest.

SOCY 692. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. A maximum of 6 credits may be submitted toward the master's degree. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and graduate program committee.

SOCY 693. Internship. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours (50 contact hours per credit). 1-6 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Permission of the internship coordinator and graduate director required for enrollment. A graduate-level internship that allows students to explore professional opportunities as related to the discipline of sociology. Students will be required to write a professional paper applying sociological concepts and methodologies to their experiences in the setting, as appropriate.

SOCY 694. Practicum in Sociology. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-6 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Provides opportunities for training experiences in sociological applications under faculty supervision leading to progressively greater degrees of skill development. Specific experiences offered vary from semester to semester.

SOCY 698. M.S. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

1-6 credits. May be repeated.

Spanish (SPAN)

SPAN 533. Spanish for the Professions. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; 1-4 lecture hours. 1-4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. Prerequisites: SPAN 301; SPAN 305 or 307 or 311; SPAN 320 or 321; SPAN 330 or 331; SPAN 404. An intensive study of specialized communication in Spanish. The content of this course will emphasize the knowledge and language skills for particular professions, which may include business, education, health sciences and translation. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topic offered each semester.

SPAN 543. Texts and Contexts in Spain and Latin America. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; 1-4 lecture hours. 1-4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. Prerequisites: SPAN 301; SPAN 305 or 307 or 311; SPAN 320 or 321; SPAN 330 or 331. Restricted to seniors in Spanish concentration with at least 85 credit hours taken toward the degree. An exploration of themes concerning Spain, Latin America and/or Latinos in the U.S. as reflected in a variety of textual genres, including film.

Statistical Sciences (STAT)

STAT 508. Introduction to Social Statistics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Introduction to statistical methods applicable in a variety of settings, with emphasis on nonexperimental data. Data description and analysis including chi-square and t-tests, using a statistical computing package. Not applicable toward M.S. in Mathematical Sciences or Computer Science. Crosslisted as: SOCY 508.

STAT 513. Mathematical Statistics I. 3 Hours.

Continuous course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 307. Probability, random variables and their properties, distributions, moment generating functions, limit theorems, estimators and their properties; Neyman-Pearson and likelihood ratio criteria for testing hypotheses. Crosslisted as: BIOS 513.

STAT 514. Mathematical Statistics II. 3 Hours.

Continuous course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: STAT 513/BIOS 513. Probability, random variables and their properties, distributions, moment generating functions, limit theorems, estimators and their properties; Neyman-Pearson and likelihood ratio criteria for testing hypotheses. Crosslisted as: BIOS 514.

STAT 543. Statistical Methods I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment restricted to students with graduate standing, or those with one course in statistics and permission of instructor. Basic concepts and techniques of statistical methods, including the collection and display of information, data analysis and statistical measures; variation, sampling and sampling distributions; point estimation, confidence intervals and tests of hypotheses for one and two sample problems; principles of one-factor experimental design, one-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons; correlation and simple linear regression analysis; contingency tables and tests for goodness of fit. Students may receive degree credit for only one of STAT 541, STAT 543 or BIOS 543, or STAT 641. Neither STAT 543 nor BIOS 543 is applicable toward the M.S. degree in mathematical sciences or the M.S. degree in computer science.

STAT 544. Statistical Methods II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: STAT 314, STAT 541 or STAT 543, or an equivalent. Advanced treatment of the design of experiments and the statistical analysis of experimental data using analysis of variance and multiple-regression. Includes the use of a statistical software package for data analysis.

STAT 546. Linear Models. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: STAT 513 and one applied course in statistics, or permission of instructor. A study of the theory underlying the general linear model and general linear hypothesis. Topics include the general linear model for quantitative responses (including multiple regression, analysis of variance and analysis of covariance), binomial regression models for binary data (including logistic regression and probit models) and Poisson regression models for count data (including log-linear models for contingency tables and hazard models for survival data).

STAT 591. Topics in Statistics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Course open to qualified undergraduates. Selected topics in statistics.

STAT 608. Statistics for Social Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: STAT/SOCY 508 or SOCY 214 or permission of instructor. Statistical methods applied in social research. Topics include analysis of variance, correlation and regression, including stepwise methods, and the analysis of discrete data. Study of a statistical package, emphasizing manipulation of survey data sets. Not applicable toward M.S. in Mathematical Sciences or Computer Science. Crosslisted as: SOCY 608.

STAT 613. Stochastic Processes. 3 Hours.

Continuous courses; 3 lecture hours. 3-3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate status in mathematical sciences or systems modeling and analysis, or permission of instructor. Introduction to the theory and applications of stochastic processes. Random walks, Markov processes, queuing theory, renewal theory, birth-death and diffusion processes. Time series, spectral analysis, filter, autocorrelation.

STAT 614. Stochastic Processes. 3 Hours.

Continuous courses; 3 lecture hours. 3-3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate status in mathematical sciences or systems modeling and analysis, or permission of instructor. Introduction to the theory and applications of stochastic processes. Random walks, Markov processes, queuing theory, renewal theory, birth-death and diffusion processes. Time series, spectral analysis, filter, autocorrelation.

STAT 621. Nonparametric Statistical Methods. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: any two courses of statistics or permission of instructor. Estimation and hypothesis testing when the form of the underlying distribution is unknown. One-, two- and k-sample problems. Tests of randomness, Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, analysis of contingency tables and coefficients of association. Crosslisted as: BIOS 621.

STAT 623. Discrete Multivariate Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate status in mathematical sciences or systems modeling and analysis, or permission of the instructor. Methods for the analysis of categorical data, including logistic regression and the general log-linear model. Emphasis on social and biomedical applications of these techniques using SPSS and SAS software.

STAT 625. Applied Multivariate Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate status in mathematical sciences or systems modeling and analysis, or permission of instructor. Multivariate statistics is a study of dependent random variables. This course covers methods for analyzing continuous multivariate data, such as numerical and graphical summary of multivariate observations, principal component analysis, factor analysis, classification and discrimination, canonical correlation analysis, and cluster analysis. Students will learn the motivation behind these methods, how to implement them in statistical software packages and how to interpret the results.

STAT 626. Complex Sampling Designs and Variance Estimation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: STAT 544 and 514. The analysis of data from surveys that use multistage samples, and connections to the analysis of observational studies and experiments with missing data. Computer intensive methodologies such as the jackknife and bootstrap will be introduced and applied to the problem of variance estimation in these diverse settings.

STAT 636. Machine Learning Algorithms. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment restricted to students with graduate status in mathematical sciences, systems modeling and analysis, decision sciences and business analytics, or computer science, or by permission of the instructor. Includes an in-depth analysis of machine learning algorithms for data mining, equipping students with skills necessary for the design of new algorithms. Analyses will include framing algorithms as optimization problems and a probabilistic analysis of algorithms. Students will be exposed to current areas of research in the construction of data mining algorithms. Crosslisted as: OPER 636.

STAT 641. Applied Data Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: completion of a multivariate calculus course. Experience with mathematics or statistics software is strongly recommended. Introduction to applied data analysis intended primarily for graduate students in mathematical sciences and engineering. Topics include the fundamental ideas of descriptive statistics, elementary probability theory, statistical inference including tests of hypotheses and confidence intervals, ANOVA, principles of experimental design, correlation and linear regression analysis, categorical data analysis, and quality control. Focus is on the practical side of implementing these techniques using statistical software packages. Students may receive degree credit for only one of STAT 441, STAT 543/BIOS 543 or STAT 641.

STAT 642. Design and Analysis of Experiments I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate status in mathematical sciences or systems modeling and analysis, or permission of instructor. An introduction to the design and analysis of experiments. Topics include the design and analysis of completely randomized designs, one variable block designs, the family of Latin square designs and split-plot designs. Introductions are also given to multiple comparison procedures and contrasts, analysis of covariance and factorial experiments. Applications involve the use of a statistical software package.

STAT 643. Applied Linear Regression. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 200-201, STAT 212 and MATH 310 or equivalents. An introduction to the concepts and methods of linear regression analysis. Topics include simple linear regression, multiple linear regression, the impact of model misspecification, model selection criteria, residual analysis, influence diagnostics, diagnostic plots, multicollinearity, transformations and response surface methodology. Applications involve the use of a statistical software package.

STAT 645. Bayesian Decision Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: STAT 514 or equivalent. Presents statistical decision theory and Bayesian analysis, with discussions of loss functions, risk, utility, prior information; conjugate families; posterior distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing; empirical and hierarchical Bayes analysis; and robustness.

STAT 648. Systems Reliability Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate status in mathematical sciences or systems modeling and analysis, or permission of the instructor. An introduction to engineering reliability and risk analysis, specifically failure data analysis, maintenance problems, system reliability and probabilistic risk assessment. Applications in computer science and engineering will include stochastic characterization of wear in hardware systems and the development of failure models for software systems. Decision problems such as the optimal maintenance of repairable systems and optimal testing policies for hardware and software systems will be examined. The analysis of risk through fault trees, event trees and accident precursor analysis also will be discussed. Crosslisted as: OPER 648.

STAT 649. Statistical Quality Control. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate status in mathematical sciences or systems modeling and analysis, or permission of the instructor. Demonstrates how statistics and data analysis can be applied effectively to process control and management. Topics include the definition of quality, its measurement through statistical techniques, variable and attribute control charts, CUSUM charts, multivariate control charts, process capability analysis, design of experiments, and classical and Bayesian acceptance sampling. Statistical software will be used to apply the techniques to real-life case studies from manufacturing and service industries. Crosslisted as: OPER 649.

STAT 650. Design and Analysis of Response Surface Experiments. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment restricted to students with graduate status in mathematical sciences or systems modeling and analysis, or permission of the instructor. Philosophy, terminology and nomenclature for response surface methodology, analysis in the vicinity of the stationary point, canonical analysis, description of the response surface, rotatability, uniform information designs, central composite designs and design optimality. Crosslisted as: BIOS 650.

STAT 675. Time Series Analysis I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate status in mathematical sciences or systems modeling and analysis, or permission of instructor. Analysis of data when observations are not mutually independent, stationary and nonstationary time series, ARIMA modeling, trend elimination, seasonal models, intervention analysis, transfer function analysis, prediction and applications in economics and engineering.

STAT 691. Special Topics in Statistics. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A detailed study of selected topics in statistics.

STAT 696. Applied Project. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours (to be arranged). 1-3 credits. Up to three credits will be applied to the M.S. in Mathematical Sciences (operations research or statistics concentration) per section. Can be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: SSOR 690 or permission of the faculty adviser. Designed to allow students to apply concepts and theories learned in other courses to a practical situation. Includes the selection, written description, completion and written report of the project and a presentation of the findings. Students may not receive credit for both OPER/STAT 696 and OPER/STAT 698. Graded as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Crosslisted as: OPER 696.

STAT 697. Directed Research. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits per semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Supervised individual research and study in an area not covered in the present curriculum or in one that significantly extends present coverage. Research culminates with an oral presentation and submission of a written version of this presentation to the supervising faculty member.

STAT 698. Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

Hours to be arranged. 1-3 credits. A total of 3 or 6 credits may be applied to the M.S. in Mathematical Sciences/Statistics. (A total of 3 credits for an expository thesis or a total of 6 credits for a research thesis.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Independent research culminating in the writing of the required thesis as described in this bulletin. Grade of "S," "U" or "F" may be assigned in this course.

STAT 725. Advanced Multivariate Statistical Methods. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: STAT 625 and STAT 643. This course emphasizes statistical analysis, methodology and theory in modern statistical learning. A variety of multivariate statistical methods, algorithms and software tools will be introduced, with emphasis on conceptual, theoretical and computational aspects. Topics include regularized regression (linear/nonlinear), classification, clustering, sufficient dimension reduction and high dimensional data analysis. Applications involve the use of a statistical software package.

STAT 736. Mathematics of Knowledge and Search Engines. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: STAT 541 or equivalent. Investigates the mathematics, methods and algorithms for searching for and extracting structures of interest (knowledge) from large and possibly high-dimensional datasets. The motivation is the rapid and phenomenal growth of the search engine (as demonstrated by Google) as a major tool for search on the Internet, which has impacted commerce, education and the study of social, financial and scientific datasets. The development of the mathematical and statistical learning algorithms behind these search engines has led to advances in how large, high-dimensional datasets can be effectively analyzed for the extraction of knowledge. Crosslisted as: OPER 736.

STAT 742. Design and Analysis of Experiments II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: STAT 642. Advanced study of the design and analysis of experiments. Topics include the design and analysis of incomplete block designs, factorial designs, fractional factorial designs, asymmetric factorial designs, blocking in fractional factorial designs, nested designs and response surface designs. Applications involve the use of a statistical software package.

STAT 744. Regression II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: STAT 643 or equivalent. Theoretical development and advanced applications of the general linear regression model and nonlinear regression models. Topics include an overview of multiple linear regression, generalized least squares and weighted regression, procedures for diagnosing and combating multicollinearity, advanced model selection criteria, influence diagnostics including multiple observation diagnostics and singular value decomposition, nonlinear regression, Poisson regression, logistic regression, generalized linear models and the exponential family, variance modeling and nonparametric regression. Applications involve the use of a statistical software package.

STAT 745. Advanced Bayesian Statistics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: STAT 546 and STAT 645 or permission of instructor. Introduces modern aspects of Bayesian methodology. Numerical and sampling techniques such as the Gibbs sampler, importance sampling resampling, Monte Carlo integration, Metropolis-Hastings sampling and adaptive sampling methods. Inferential methods including model selection, highest probability models, Bayesian model averaging, Markov chain Monte Carlo model composition. A large portion of the course will survey the current literature in the areas listed above as well as applications of the methods.

STAT 746. Spatial Data Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: STAT 513 and STAT 643 or permission of instructor. The course will introduce graphical and quantitative analysis for spatial data. Topics include data on fixed-grids, point-referenced data, lattice data, point-pattern data and experimental design for spatial data collection. Students will be expected learn how to program in appropriate software packages.

STAT 775. Time Series Analysis II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: STAT 513 and STAT 675, or permission of instructor. Advanced study of time series analysis. Topics include multivariate time series, state-space models and GARCH models. Applications involve the use of a statistical software package.

STAT 791. Special Topics in Statistics. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisitie: permission of instructor. A detailed study of selected advanced topics in statistics.

Systems Modeling and Analysis (SYSM)

SYSM 681. Systems Seminar I. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Prerequisite: graduate standing in mathematical sciences or systems modeling and analysis. Designed to help students attain proficiency in academic communication and research in the context of mathematics, operations research and statistics. Focuses on the discipline-specific communication and research skills necessary to excel in graduate studies in these disciplines.

SYSM 682. Systems Seminar II. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Prerequisite: graduate standing in mathematical sciences or systems modeling and analysis. Designed to help students attain proficiency in professional communication and research in the context of mathematics, operations research and statistics. Focuses on the discipline-specific communication and research skills necessary to excel in professional careers in these disciplines.

SYSM 683. Systems Seminar III. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Prerequisite: graduate standing in mathematical sciences or systems modeling and analysis. Designed to help students attain proficiency in literature review and research in the context of mathematics, operations research and statistics. Focuses on the discipline-specific literature review and research skills necessary to write an applied project, thesis or dissertation.

SYSM 697. Systems Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: graduate standing in systems modeling and analysis. Supervised individual research and study. Research culminates with an oral presentation and submission of a written report to the supervising faculty member.

SYSM 780. Stochastic Methods in Mathematical Biology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: STAT 513 or 613, MATH 532. Covers commonly used stochastic methods in mathematical biology, including cellular physiology and related areas. Topics covered include stochastic differential equation models, applications of first passage time (escape time) and applications of density or master equations, diffusion in cells, stochastic ion channel dynamics, and cellular communication. Students will be expected to learn how to program in appropriate software packages.

SYSM 798. Dissertation Research. 1-12 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-12 credits. May be repeated for credit. Research and work leading to the completion of the Ph.D. dissertation in systems modeling and analysis. Graded S/U/F.

World Studies (WRLD)

WRLD 530. Concepts in World Cinema. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Can be repeated for credit with different themes. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or graduate standing. Exploration of aspects of film theory combined with a study of cinema across national traditions and movements. Each semester a different thematic focus is engaged to illuminate issues in film composition and reception. Themes will include: the Holocaust, film and screen theory in the digital era, decolonizing the gaze: Black African and Caribbean cinema.

WRLD 535. World Filmmakers. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Can be repeated for credit with different themes. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and/or graduate standing. Centers on the distinct yet interrelated roles of directors (as individual "authors" or as part of a movement or tradition), studios, audiences, national film industries, etc. in the production, development and interpretation of screen media. Each semester a different vantage point, i.e. gender, is used to open new perspectives on film, a critical evaluation of national film traditions and the elements of cinematographic style. Topics include: women filmmakers in world cinema, Spanish and Latin American filmmakers, filmmakers of the "New German Cinema.

WRLD 593. Internship With French Film Festival. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 8 hours per week in festival office during semester and 8 hours per day during festival in Byrd Theatre. 3 credits. Provides students practical hands-on experience working in the French Film Festival office. Students will research and write questions to ask French actors, directors and cinematographers during the festival. The students edit a final audiovisual project of their actor/director interviews. Students work closely with the founders/directors of the French Film Festival.

School of Allied Health Professions

Allied Health Professions (ALHP)

ALHP 573. Teaching in Health Professional Schools. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Study of the relationships between health education and higher education in general, current essentials, standards in education for the health professions and theoretical approaches to the implementation of these standards in both academic and clinical learning. Emphasis will be placed on modes of adapting to future needs of the professions.

ALHP 582. Supervision in the Allied Health Professions. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Study of the supervisory process and staff development, training in communication and interpersonal skills, and public relations within the health facility.

ALHP 591. Special Topics. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; 1-4 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Interdisciplinary study through lectures, tutorial study or independent research of selected topics not provided in other courses. Graded as Pass/Fail.

ALHP 594. Health Education Practicum. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 4 laboratory hours. 1-6 credits. Preparation, presentation and evaluation of selected educational experiences in the appropriate graduate program. Section 801: general; Section 802: nurse anesthesia; Section 803: clinical laboratory science.

ALHP 596. Supervisory and Administrative Practicum in Allied Health Clinics. 1-9 Hours.

Semester course; 60 clinical hours per credit. 1-9 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. The course is designed for the student who will be assuming supervisory and administrative roles. Areas to be covered include clinical personnel management, budgeting and ordering of materials and equipment, consultation with physicians, developing and troubleshooting clinical methods, designing job descriptions and implementation of quality control programs. Section 01: Clinical Laboratory Sciences Section 02: Physical Therapy.

ALHP 701. Health Services Delivery Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Examines the structure and function of the U.S. health-care delivery system, the concepts and processes of health and illness, the institutional and individual providers of health services and related theory. Focuses on interdisciplinary care. Emphasizes meeting the unique needs of ethnically and culturally diverse populations.

ALHP 702. Finance and Economic Theory for Health Care. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Focuses on foundational concepts of micro-economic theory and their application in analyzing health care; understanding the structure and dynamics of health-care markets; and on monitoring and controlling the allocation of resources within health organizations. Emphasizes each of the health-care disciplines and how finance and economics affect the practice of delivery and evaluation.

ALHP 708. Ethics and Health Care. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Applies the principles of biomedical and health-care ethics to develop a more informed understanding of ethical decision making in the formulation of health-care policy as well as within the clinical environment. Focuses on utilizing and searching biomedical ethics literature, current issues in biomedical ethics, the discipline and process of ethical reflection and case consultation.

ALHP 712. Curriculum and Communication Design for Health Care Professionals. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Required course. Examines various aspects of curriculum development, including instructional design and use of multimedia technology for teacher-learner communication and learner growth and development pertinent to doctoral education. Covers relevant learning theories in higher education and implications on curriculum design. Requires students to develop a Web-based interactive, multimedia course.

ALHP 716. Grant Writing and Project Management in Health Related Sciences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Examines fundamentals of allied health grant writing and proposal preparation in the health related sciences, including funding source determination, responding to an RFP, basic elements of a proposal, proposal review procedures and allocation processes. Requires development of a complete proposal and critique of existing proposals.

ALHP 718. Health Informatics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Analyzes current information and management systems from an allied health sciences perspective. Emphasizes knowledge representation in health care, information needs, storage and retrieval, clinical information systems, standards of health information management and the evaluation of information management systems. Stresses the efficient and innovative use of technology.

ALHP 760. Biostatistical Methods for Health Related Sciences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Examines basic concepts and techniques of statistical methods, enabling individuals to conduct scientific inquiry as well as critical appraisal of the scientific literature. Includes the collection and display of information, data analysis and statistical measures; variation, sampling and sampling distributions; point estimation, confidence intervals and tests of hypotheses for one- and two-sample problems; principles of one-factor experimental design, one-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons; and correlation and regression analysis.

ALHP 761. Health Related Sciences Research Design. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Covers the design of experimental and quasi-experimental studies in the health-care field. Emphasizes issues related to measurement, validity of designs, sampling and data collection. Focuses on the logic of causal inference, including formulation of testable hypotheses, and the design, methods and measures that facilitate research.

ALHP 762. Multivariate Statistical Methods for Health Related Sciences Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Examines multivariate statistical analysis and evaluation research methods with application to health related science research. Emphasizes data reduction techniques, factor analysis, principle components, discriminant analysis and logistic regression to analyze data in the health field.

ALHP 763. Clinical Outcomes Evaluation for Health Related Sciences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisites: ALHP 760, 761 and 762. Prepares students to design, implement and interpret studies that evaluate the outcome and effectiveness of health services delivery. Emphasizes identification of emerging trends in health related sciences research, identification of meaningful research questions based on existing information and the use of primary and secondary data to assess outcomes.

ALHP 764. Advanced Methods for Health Sciences Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Examines the application of multivariate statistical analysis and evaluation methods to health related sciences research. Emphasizes advanced statistical methods (e.g., LISREL, Event History Analysis) and design to analyze panel data in the health field. Elective course.

ALHP 781. Doctoral Seminar in Health Related Sciences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Student's desired topic of study must be identified and approved prior to enrollment. Studies specific topics in the area of the student's specialty track.

ALHP 792. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1-6 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Offers special individual study or research leading toward investigation in specialty track. Conducted under the guidance of a faculty adviser.

ALHP 793. Research Practicum. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Offers supervised investigation of selected problems in the area of the student's specialty track. Includes conducting and analyzing field research.

ALHP 890. Dissertation Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Deals with general purpose, content and functions of the dissertation process related to the student's specialty track. Leads to the preparation of dissertation proposal.

ALHP 899. Dissertation Research. 1-9 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. Variable credit. Minimum of 9 semester hours required for Ph.D. Prerequisites: Completion of required course work and comprehensive examination. Covers dissertation research under the direction of a faculty adviser.

Clinical Laboratory Sciences (CLLS)

CLLS 500. Concepts and Techniques in Clinical Laboratory Science. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Restricted to candidates in the categorical master's program. Presents the basic theoretical concepts, laboratory techniques and skills employed in the areas of clinical chemistry, hematology, immunohematology and microbiology.

CLLS 501. Instrumental Methods of Analysis I. 2-4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 4 laboratory hours. 2-4 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A study of modern research and clinical laboratory instrumentation and procedures. Principles, theory and comparison of laboratory instruments are discussed along with the factors affecting their operation. Laboratory exercises are designed to demonstrate the practical applications of the instruments in the research and clinical laboratory. Areas covered include basic electronics, principles of photometry, spectrophotometry, fluorometry, flame emission photometry, atomic absorption spectrophotometry and computerized instrumentation.

CLLS 502. Instrumental Methods of Analysis II. 2-4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 4 laboratory hours. 2-4 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A study of modern research and clinical laboratory instrumentation and procedures. Principles, theory and comparison of laboratory instruments are discussed along with the factors affecting their operation. Laboratory exercises are designed to demonstrate the practical applications of the instruments in research and clinical laboratory. Areas covered include electrophoresis, chromatography, particle counters, radio-isotope counters and clinical laboratory automation.

CLLS 580. Principles of Education/Management. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 practicum hours. 1-3 credits. Introduces fundamental educational theories and practice, principles of management and employee relations and health-care issues from a global perspective with an emphasis on multicultural diversity. Stresses the application in the clinical laboratory. Requires a practicum in education and in management following the completion of the didactic portion.

CLLS 595. Clinical Practicum. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; 80-320 clock hours. 1-4 credits. Prerequisite: At least one of the following: CLLS 301-302, 306 and 310, 307-308, 311-312, or by permission of instructor. Individual participation in a hospital laboratory in a selected specialty area: clinical chemistry, hematology, microbiology or immunohematology. Students gain practical experience in the performance of procedures and use of instruments by working with the clinical staff. After gaining competence, the students are expected to properly perform and sign out routine laboratory work under supervision. Based on adviser's recommendation and student's past experience, the course may be taken for less than four credits. Graded as pass/fail.

CLLS 601. Theoretical Blood Banking. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A comprehensive study of the blood groups in man, including biochemistry, genetics and clinical significance. Topics relating to problems with antibodies to the blood group antigens are discussed.

CLLS 602. Molecular Diagnostics in Clinical Laboratory Sciences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to students in the M.S. in Clinical Laboratory Sciences' advanced master's track or permission of instructor. Provides the basic principles and techniques of molecular diagnostics and information for establishing a molecular diagnostics laboratory. Examines the utilization of molecular techniques in the clinical laboratory for patient diagnosis and therapy. Emphasizes the use of these techniques in the areas of immunology, microbiology, hematology/oncology, and inherited genetic disorders.

CLLS 605. Advanced Hematology. 2-4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 2-4 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Discusses advanced laboratory techniques used to analyze blood dyscrasias and hemostatic disorders. Students also may perform related laboratory tests.

CLLS 608. Laboratory Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Applies an organ system approach to the laboratory diagnosis of infectious diseases. Emphasizes diagnostic methods to verify infections because of pathogenic micro-organisms and includes related diagnostic microbiology laboratory issues. Utilizes a distance learning format.

CLLS 610. Interpretative Clinical Hematology. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Principles of hematopoiesis and related pathological and pathophysiological correlation of hematological disorders are discussed.

CLLS 611. Analytical Techniques for Clinical Mass Spectrometry. 2 Hours.

6-week summer session; 12 lecture and 36 laboratory contact hours. 2 credits. Enrollment restricted to student admitted to the M.S. in Clinical Laboratory Sciences program or by permission of the instructor. Focuses on the proper utilization of chemicals and equipment required for the calibration, quality control and operation of clinically relevant mass spectrometry systems. Emphasizes calculations and demonstration of proficiency with quantitative techniques.

CLLS 612. Mass Spectrometry Systems for Clinical Analyses. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: CLLS 611 or permission of the instructor. Focuses on the principles of chemical and instrumental analysis relevant to the detection and quantitation of clinically relevant analytes using mass spectrometry systems. Emphasizes the clinical laboratory applications of different types of mass spectrometry systems, preanalytical sample preparation, and integration of chromatography and mass spectrometry.

CLLS 613. Mass Spectrometry Assay Development for In Vitro Diagnostics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: CLLS 611 and CLLS 612 or permission of the instructor. Focuses on the principles of assay development and evaluation of methods for the measurement of clinically relevant analytes using chromatography-mass spectrometry systems. Emphasizes “best practices” as found in CLSI, SOFT and FDA guidance documents.

CLLS 627. Advanced Concepts in Immunology and Immunohematology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: CLLS 306, 310 and 496. Presents advanced topics in clinical immunology and immunohematology. Focuses on the integration of advanced concepts in the evaluation of laboratory data and solving clinical and methodological problems related to autoimmune diseases, ABO discrepancies, compatibility testing, hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn and transfusion reactions.

CLLS 628. Advanced Concepts in Microbiology. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisites: CLLS 307 and 308; and CLLS 496 or 595. Advances study of pathogenic microbiology principles. Includes application of laboratory data and techniques to solve clinical microbiology problems.

CLLS 629. Advanced Concepts in Hematology. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisites: CLLS 302, and CLLS 485 or 595. Focuses on developing and expanding the knowledge acquired in the prerequisite courses in hematology and hemostasis. Incorporates case study evaluations, challenging current hematology topics in the literature and the integration of assessing laboratory data and clinical problems. Emphasizes the development of skills in critical thinking and analyzing clinical data.

CLLS 630. Advanced Concepts in Clinical Chemistry and Instrumentation. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisites: CLLS 311 and 312; and CLLS 483 or 595. Focuses on advanced concepts in clinical chemistry, including endocrinology, measurement of vitamins and tumor markers, method evaluation and laboratory and hospital information systems. Integrates the basic knowledge and skills acquired in the undergraduate sequence of courses with advanced concepts in clinical chemistry/instrumentation to analyze the more complex clinical and analytical problems presented by the aforementioned topics. Includes the design and conduct of library research and laboratory experiments, and data analysis to generate recommendations that are practical and applicable in a real clinical chemistry service.

CLLS 690. Clinical Laboratory Sciences Seminar. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Presentation and discussion of current research and topics of interest by the departmental faculty, graduate students and visiting lecturers.

CLLS 691. Special Topics in Clinical Laboratory Sciences. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; 1-4 credits. This course provides for lectures, tutorial studies and/or library assignments in specialized areas not available in formal courses or research training.

CLLS 694. Molecular Diagnostic Practicum I. 8 Hours.

Semester course; 640 clock hours. 8 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Provides direct observation and practice in a molecular diagnostics laboratory with emphasis on nucleic acid extraction and molecular amplification techniques. Develops proficiency at performing, analyzing and reporting test results. Graded as pass/fail.

CLLS 695. Molecular Diagnostic Practicum II. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 320 clock hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Provides direct observation and practice in molecular diagnostics laboratory. Focuses on molecular hybridization and human identity analyses. Develops proficiency at all stages of nucleic acid analyses including performing, analyzing and reporting test results. Introduces practice issues involved in management of a molecular diagnostics laboratory. Graded as pass/fail.

CLLS 696. Advanced Blood Bank Practicum. 2 Hours.

6 laboratory hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A laboratory course with practical experiences in resolving complex blood group serological problems and discussion of these problems. Donor phlebotomy, processing of donor units, component preparation and instruction of undergraduate clinical laboratory sciences students also are performed.

CLLS 761. Research Methodology in Clinical Laboratory Sciences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Focuses on the principles of scientific research as applicable to problems encountered in the clinical laboratory sciences. Also focuses on developing a draft research proposal that would be the foundation for a project that would satisfy the research requirement for the master's degree in clinical laboratory sciences.

CLLS 790. Research in Clinical Laboratory Sciences. 1-15 Hours.

Semester course; 1-15 credits. Research leading to the M.S. degree.

Gerontology (GRTY)

GRTY 501. Physiological Aging. 3 Hours.

3 credits. This course is taught at an introductory level in contrast to the more substantive background required for GRTY 601. Distinguishes between normal aging and those chronic illnesses often associated with aging in humans. This course would be valuable to those interested in the general processes of human aging.

GRTY 510. Aging. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Introduces the student to the biological, psychological, social, ethical, economic and cultural ramifications of aging. Presents an interprofessional approach to the complex issues and realities of aging. Discusses aging concepts and biopsychosocial theoretical frameworks relevant to the field of aging studies.

GRTY 601. Biological and Physiological Aging. 3 Hours.

3 credits. Biological theories of aging; cellular, physical, systemic and sensory change; health maintenance.

GRTY 602. Psychology of Aging. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. Enrollment requires permission of instructor. Students must complete social sciences research methods before taking this course.Psychological adjustment in late life; special emphasis on personality, cognitive and emotional development; life crises associated with the aging process. Crosslisted as: PSYC 602.

GRTY 603. Social Gerontology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Focuses on the sociopsychological and sociological aspects of aging. Various sociopsychological and social theories of aging will be discussed. The course will provide a broad overview of several general topics such as the demography of aging, politics and economics of aging, and cross-cultural aspects of aging. The course will offer an in-depth analysis of particular role changes that accompany aging (i.e., retirement, widowhood, institutionalization).

GRTY 604. Problems, Issues and Trends in Gerontology. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 4 lecture hours. 4 credits. Covers a broad range of topics of critical interest to practitioners, policymakers and researchers working with older persons. Explores how societal trends affect the health and social services systems. Recognizes the importance of interdisciplinary approaches to the study of aging issues: Insights from practitioners and the knowledge of researchers will be combined to investigate viable responses to emerging trends. Provides a multifaceted view of these issues based on research expertise and practical experience. Students will experience a visit to the General Assembly and will follow and critically evaluate current aging-related legislation in state government.

GRTY 605. Social Science Research Methods Applied to Gerontology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate statistics. Application of social science methods and techniques to study of the aged; data sources; types of problems encountered; data analysis; research reporting; use of research findings.

GRTY 606. Aging and Human Values. 3 Hours.

3 credits. Identification and analysis of value systems of the aged, exploration of religious beliefs; death and dying; moral, ethical and legal rights; human values and dignity.

GRTY 607. Field Study in Gerontology. 1-5 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-4 credits. May be repeated to the required maximum of 4 credits. Focuses on identification and systematic exploration and study of a community-identified need, issue or task germane to the student's gerontology concentration with special attention given to funding opportunities and grant writing. Applies specific concepts and approaches to assessment analysis as determined in consultation with the student's program adviser. Implementation and evaluation of a terminal project and dissemination of the results through a portfolio collection, as well as potential professional presentation, grant submission or manuscript submissions. Graded as S/U/F.

GRTY 608. Grant Writing. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Provides the skills necessary to research and write a grant. Explores how to find grant funding opportunities through both private and public sources. Describes the process of preparing a proposal including writing the narrative and preparing a budget.

GRTY 609. Career Planning. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Focuses on the transition from academia to the professional role and workforce. Identifies individual strengths and evaluates career goals. Prepares students to deliver resumé and communication strategy for job seeking in the aging workforce.

GRTY 610. Gero-pharmacology. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Prerequisite: undergraduate course in statistics. Discusses description of medication-related problems that may be experienced by older adults. Identifies strategies to prevent medication-related problems in older adults, defines the role of the pharmacist as a partner in resolving medication-related problems, applies the strategies for preventing medication-related problems to patient cases and evaluates the medication regimen for an older adult residing in assisted living.

GRTY 611. Death and Dying. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Focuses on questions surrounding death, dying and bereavement, with a special focus on developmental and cultural issues. Explores concepts through research, experiential learning and reflection.

GRTY 612. Recreation, Leisure and Aging. 3 Hours.

3 credits. An analysis of the quality and quantity of leisure in maximizing the quality of life for the older person. Focus will be on concepts of leisure; the interrelationship of leisure service delivery systems and other supportive services; the meaning of leisure to the elderly in the community and within institutional settings; and innovative programming.

GRTY 613. GLBT in Aging. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Explores the biopsychosocial and ecopolitical aspects of the intersection of aging and being a member of the gay, lesbian, bisexual and/or transgender-identified minority populations. Reviews normative aging factors in the context of being a member of the GLBT population. Discusses the intersection of these with such factors as race, socioeconomic status and other confounding factors.

GRTY 615. Aging and Mental Disorders. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The course deals with common psychological disorders and problems of late life, their etiology, methods of evaluating psychological status and intervention strategies that have been used successfully with older persons. Topics include epidemiology of psychological disorders and mental health service utilization; late-life stressors and crises; psychology of health, illness and disability; techniques and procedures in the evaluation of the older adult; functional and organic disorders; institutionalization; individual, group and family therapy; behavioral techniques; peer counseling and crisis intervention; and drugs and the elderly. Crosslisted as: PSYC 615.

GRTY 616. Geriatric Rehabilitation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides an overview of the process in geriatric rehabilitation with an assessment, psychosocial aspects and rural issues in rehabilitation. Considers major disabling conditions in late life, and emphasizes the nature of the interdisciplinary rehabilitation process with aging clients.

GRTY 618. The Business of Geriatric Care Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Evaluates information and materials needed for a basic understanding of the fundamentals of geriatric care management. Distinguishes and critically evaluates the tasks required of a geriatric care manager and the knowledge and skills needed to perform those tasks. Compares and contrasts multiple geriatric care management business models.

GRTY 619. Geriatric Care Management Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits. Prerequisites: GRTY 601, GRTY/PSYC 602 and GRTY 603. Pairs a student with a geriatric care manager practicing in the field. Applies information learned in gerontology core classes to hands-on clinical experience with a geriatric care manager. Supervises field experience with clients, providing advocacy and supervision, and coordinating needs to ensure independence and safety.

GRTY 620. Geriatric Interdisciplinary Team Training. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Emphasizes interdisciplinary teamwork with a focus on geriatrics. Increases the awareness of the importance of interdisciplinary teamwork when working with older adults. Uses a case-focused approach to discuss care for older adults in a variety of settings, including acute care, long-term care, rehabilitation, PACE and home health care.

GRTY 621. Professional Writing. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Provides instruction on APA guidelines for writing and referencing articles in scholarly papers. Emphasizes critical thinking and awareness skills for reviewing journal articles.

GRTY 624. Community and Community Services for the Elderly. 3 Hours.

3 credits. A conceptual/theoretical overview of community focusing on the ecological, psychological and social dimensions of community and on communities of the aged. Crosslisted as: SOCY 624.

GRTY 625. Aging and the Minority Community. 3 Hours.

3 credits. An analysis of the relationship between the aging process and American minority communities. In addition to the sociological factors, the course will examine demographic, physiological and psychological aspects of minority aging. Attention also will focus on dominant social problems and federal policies toward the aged.

GRTY 627. Psychology of Health and Health Care for the Elderly. 3 Hours.

Focuses on factors in the etiology, course and treatment of illness; patient/practitioner relationship; patient compliance and psychosocial issues in terminal care.

GRTY 629. Spirituality and Aging. 2-3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 or 3 lecture hours. 2 or 3 credits. Explores the spiritual, psychological and social dynamics associated with aging. Provides special attention to the spiritual and emotional impact on caregivers who work with aging patients. Crosslisted as: PATC 629.

GRTY 638. Long-term Care Administration. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Explores the history and development of the long-term care continuum in the United States. Emphasizes assisted living and the knowledge and skills required to be a successful assisted living administrator. Utilizes the five domains of assisted living administration as the framework. Facilitates learning on leadership and management, with a focus on providing optimal, person-centered care and services to older adults living in a licensed and regulated environment.

GRTY 639. Human Resource Management and Leadership for Gerontologists. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Provides an introduction and foundation to human resources in aging services geared toward administrative and entrepreneurial gerontologists. Emphasizes leadership theory and utilizes the human resource management domain of practice as a guide for structure. Emphasizes developing the culture of an organization to facilitate effective practices in managing a safe and healthy work environment. Reviews state and federal laws, rules and regulations. Allows students to apply skills through cases and exercises relevant to their intended career path.

GRTY 640. Financial Management for Gerontological Leaders. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Provides an introduction and foundation to financial management in aging services geared toward administrative and entrepreneurial gerontologists. Utilizes the financial management domain of practice as structure for this course. Emphasizes creating and managing organizational finances and multiple payment systems. Reviews state and federal laws, rules and regulations. Allows students to apply skills through cases and exercises relevant to their intended career path.

GRTY 641. Survey of Psychological Assessment and Treatment of the Older Adult. 3 Hours.

3 credits. A combination didactic and skills training course; review of major treatment strategies and techniques for utilization with the older adult client with emphasis on group, individual and paraprofessional delivery systems; evaluation of crisis intervention and consultation team approaches; lectures, demonstration and classroom practice of actual treatment techniques. Crosslisted as: PSYC 641.

GRTY 642. Practicum in Clinical Geropsychology. 3 Hours.

3 credits. An initial practicum geared as an entry to the team practicum experience; focus on familiarizing the student with mental health service delivery systems for the elderly in the Richmond community; rotation through a limited number of facilities such as nursing homes, retirement centers, nutrition sites, emergency hotline services for the elderly and various agencies involved in deinstitutionalization; possible extended placement in a particular facility. Crosslisted as: PSYC 642.

GRTY 691. Topical Seminar. 3 Hours.

3 credits. Seminars on specialized areas of gerontological interest. Examples of special topic courses taught in previous years: nutrition and aging; psychophysiology and neurobiology of aging; wellness and aging; and preretirement planning.

GRTY 692. Independent Studies. 1-3 Hours.

1-3 credits. Directed in-depth independent study of a particular problem or topic in gerontology about which an interest or talent has been demonstrated.

GRTY 792. Independent Studies for Master's-/Ph.D.-level Students. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Independent study in selected area under supervision of gerontology faculty. Focuses on in-depth research and analysis of a major focus area of gerontology, leading to a comprehensive, publishable quality review paper. Emphasizes integrating previous graduate training into aging topical area.

GRTY 798. Thesis. 3-6 Hours.

3-6 credits. A research study of a topic or problem approved by the thesis committee and completed in accordance with the acceptable standards for thesis writing.

GRTY 799. Thesis. 3-6 Hours.

3-6 credits. A research study of a topic or problem approved by the thesis committee and completed in accordance with the acceptable standards for thesis writing.

Health Administration (HADM)

HADM 602. Health System Organization, Financing and Performance. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines the structure, functioning and financing of the U.S. health services system. Emphasizes foundational concepts for understanding and analyzing patterns of health and illness; health care cost, quality, access and utilization; workforce; competition in health care markets; and supplier, provider and payer effectiveness and efficiency.

HADM 606. Health Care Managerial Accounting. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Financial Accounting. A foundation course covering health care financial accounting, financial statement analysis, budgeting, reimbursement, costing and short-term decision making. Emphasizes accounting concepts and using financial data in management of providers and payers.

HADM 607. Financial Management in Health Organizations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: HADM 606. Examines theory and techniques of corporate financial management as applied to health services providers and insurers including time value of money, working capital management, capital budgeting techniques, cash flow analysis and capital structure planning.

HADM 608. Seminar in Health Care Finance. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: HADM 606 and HADM 607. Advanced studies of financial issues and the application of analytic tools in case studies and exercises. Designed to enhance and strengthen the knowledge and skills provided in the graduate program's foundation and required courses in accounting and finance.

HADM 609. Managerial Epidemiology. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: undergraduate course in statistics. Introduces and uses analytical techniques to study and measure the health status of populations and to evaluate programs. Topics covered include health status measurement, evaluation design and managerial applications of epidemiology.

HADM 610. Health Analytics and Decision Support. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: undergraduate course in statistics. Applications of analytics and decision support to health services institutions. Applications of operations research and industrial engineering techniques using large institutional data for health care planning, control and decision-making including deterministic and stochastic decision analysis models and their use in health services administration.

HADM 611. Health Care Law and Bioethics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Presents elements of law and legal principles as they apply to the administration of hospitals and health care systems. Emphasizes medical malpractice, medical-legal issues, informed consent, antitrust, health care business law and bioethics. Provides a legal foundation for the practice of health administration and clinical ethics through the use of case law and case analysis.

HADM 612. Information Systems for Health Care Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is restricted to majors only. Introduces and applies basic vocabulary, foundational principles and practical strategies associated with information systems relevant to the health care administrator. Examines health care information and information systems, technology standards and security, as well as management challenges.

HADM 614. Health Care Marketing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Foundational theories, concepts and techniques of marketing applied to the distinctive properties of health care services. Emphasis placed on the role of marketing and aligning organizational capacity and health care needs; market analysis and planning; strategic marketing management; tactical marketing mix design; designing and managing service delivery systems and developing new offerings.

HADM 615. Health Care Politics and Policy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines the political process with particular emphasis on the impact of politics on health care. Focuses on current political issues in the health field, examining conflicts and anticipating effects on the health system.

HADM 621. Advanced Medical Informatics: Technology-Strategy-Performance. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Focuses on use of technology for improving operational efficiencies, quality of care and market competitiveness. Explores various application technologies within the framework of technology-strategy-performance including: telemedicine, cyber surgery, Web-enabled clinical information systems, clinical decision support systems, artificial intelligence and expert systems, and risk-adjusted outcome assessment systems.

HADM 624. Health Economics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON 203 with a minimum grade of B and ECON 211. Develops an understanding of (1) economics as a managerial tool in making choices or decisions that will provide for an optimum allocation of limited health care resources and (2) economics as a way of thinking about and approaching issues of public policy in financing and organizing health and medical services. Individual research on crucial or controversial issues in the health care field. Crosslisted as: ECON 624.

HADM 626. International Health. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides an overview of and/or introduction to international health. Focus is on the relationship between external factors and the health of populations.

HADM 638. Administration of Long-term Care Facilities and Programs. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Focuses on unique knowledge and skills considered essential to effective long-term care administration. Emphasis is on the professional role of the long-term care administrator in providing for the health and social needs of the chronically ill and elderly. Applied skills in addressing the technical, human and conceptual problems unique to LTC are addressed through cases and field exercises.

HADM 645. Structure and Functions of Health Organizations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Surveys concepts from organizational and management theories applicable to health organizations. Considers issues in organizational structure, strategy and processes for health care organizations.

HADM 646. Health Care Organization and Leadership. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Explores the challenges of managing and leading health care organizations in the 21st century. Introduces concepts, vocabulary and ways of thinking to enable students to be more effective and insightful participants in organizational life in health care. Intended to provide the student with the basic knowledge necessary to benefit from the more detailed and advanced courses that follow in the curriculum.

HADM 647. Management of Health Care Organizations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: HADM 646. Analyzes the current state of management study and practice with the objective of achieving a balanced development of both knowledge and skills in solving the operations problems of health care institutions. Examines critically the managerial process; emphasizes leadership behavior and development, performance improvement, structure and purpose of health care organization subunits, interfunctional coordination, and organizational processes.

HADM 648. Strategic Management in Health Care Organizations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: HADM 647. Integrative seminar on strategic decision making in health care organizations. Considers the concepts and alternative models of strategic management, the strategic management process and the evaluation of strategic decisions.

HADM 649. Human Resources Management in Health Care. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Presents concepts in human resources management as applied to health care organizations. Explores relationships between human resources management and general management, nature of work and human resources, compensation and benefits, personnel planning, recruitment and selection, training and development, employee appraisal and discipline, organized labor issues, and employment and labor law.

HADM 661. Physician Practice Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Provides a practical overview of management skills and tools necessary to assist a physician group with an efficient service delivery organization. Discusses issues in the larger health care business environment that affect physician professional practice and the operational factors that define a successful organization now and in the future.

HADM 681. Clinical Concepts and Relationships. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Introduces students without clinical backgrounds (nursing, medicine, other) to medical and health care terminology. Reviews and discusses concepts that are related to health, healing, health professions and the experience of the patient. Examines the role of health professionals; emphasizes communication, problem solving and patient care improvements across professional boundaries.

HADM 682. Executive Skills I. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Applied course in executive skills and behavior of the health care executive. Focus is on the health care executive leadership development and personal effectiveness.

HADM 683. Executive Skills II. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Prerequisite: HADM 682. Advanced applied course in executive skill development. Focus is on the health care executive leader and development of skills relating to the external environment of health care organizations. Emphasizes relationships with physicians, governing boards, regulatory bodies, donors and other key stakeholders.

HADM 690. Departmental Research Seminar. 1-9 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. Variable credit. Research seminar that focuses on research design and methods organized under a single topic or a series of related topics in health services research. Applied research training for master's-level students.

HADM 691. Special Topics in Health Services Organization and Research. 3 Hours.

3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Course is devoted to specialized content area for health administration. Examples include physician practice management and advanced managed care.

HADM 692. Independent Study in Health Administration. 1-3 Hours.

1-3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Special study conducted under the guidance of a faculty sponsor.

HADM 693. Internship in Health Administration. 3 Hours.

3 credits. Prerequisite: Completion of year one of the MHA curriculum. Restricted to dual-degree students (MHA/MD and MHA/JD). Assesses and examines administrative and organizational structures and cultures of the assigned site with perspectives from macro- and micro-organizational views. Students develop an understanding and gain knowledge of the complex health care industry and the internal and external factors that influence decision-making in the organization. Students will research and prepare a management project with recommendations to assist the organization in decision-making, policy development and/or performance improvement. Graded as S/U/F.

HADM 694. Practicum in Health Administration I. 5 Hours.

5 credits. Course is restricted to students completing a one-year administrative residency. Examines contemporary problems and issues in the organization, administration and evaluation of health services. Focuses on the application of alternative approaches to administrative problem solving. Emphasizes internal and external stakeholder interests and factors that influence decision-making in health care organizations. Graded as S/U/F.

HADM 695. Practicum in Health Administration II. 3-5 Hours.

3-5 credits. Course is restricted to students completing a one-year administrative residency. Students will examine contemporary problems and issues in the organization, administration and evaluation of health services. Focus on the application of alternative approaches to administrative problem solving. Course emphasizes internal and external stakeholder interests and factors that influence decision-making in health care organizations. Students design, conduct and present the results of a management project. Additional projects will be required for students enrolling in more than 3 credits. Graded as S/U/F.

HADM 697. Directed Research. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. Variable credit. Special course offered under the guidance of a faculty sponsor for one or more students to design and implement an applied research project in the field setting. Focuses on the application of research methods to policy or operational problems of health care institutions.

HADM 701. Organizational Behavior for Health Services Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: HADM 704 and HADM 705, or permission of instructor. Provides intellectual insights into central topics of micro organizational behavior. Requires critical evaluation of organizational behavior and health services research based on organizational behavior topics. Requires identification and application of organizational behavior theoretical perspectives to issues in the health sector.

HADM 702. Research in Health Care Financing and Delivery Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: HADM 701, HADM 704 and HADM 705, or permission of the instructor. Critically reviews and evaluates emerging research in organization, delivery and financing of health care services.

HADM 704. Foundations of Health Service Organization Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines the roots of foundational theories and concepts in organization theory and their application to research on health care organizations and systems. Emphasizes the environment and structure of health care organizations and systems.

HADM 705. Advanced Health Service Organization Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: HADM 704 or permission of instructor. Covers contemporary perspectives in health organization theory in depth, with emphasis on their research application in health care organizations. Critically assesses current examples of research on health care organizations using these perspectives.

HADM 711. Introduction to Health Services Organization Research I. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Open only to Ph.D. students in health services organization and research. Assists doctoral students in becoming members of the health services research community and developing skills to be successful researchers. Introduces students to health services research as a field, major databases for health services research, career paths and related ethical issues. Develops key foundational skills including database management, statistical software, grant applications and career development. First in a two-course sequence.

HADM 713. Introduction to Health Services Organization Research II. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Open only to Ph.D. students in health services organization and research. Assists doctoral students in becoming members of the health services organization research community and developing skills to be successful researchers. Introduces students to health services organization research as a field, major databases for health services research, career paths and related ethical issues. Develops key foundational skills including management of frequently used health services organization research databases, statistical software, grant applications and career development. Second in a two-course sequence.

HADM 760. Quantitative Analysis of Health Care Data. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MRBL 624 and HADM 609, or permission of instructor. Research course emphasizing computer application and statistical analyses of health care data generated from secondary sources, including data envelopment analysis.

HADM 761. Health Services Research Methods I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Upper-division course in statistics. Research as a systematic method for examining questions derived from related theory and/or health service practice. Major focus is on the logic of causal inference, including the formulation of testable hypotheses relating to health services organization and management, the design of methods and measures to facilitate study, and the concepts, principles and methods of epidemiology.

HADM 762. Health Services Research Methods II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: HADM 761 and MRBL 632, or equivalent. Application of multivariate statistical analysis and evaluation research methods to health services research. Emphasis is placed on the use of advanced statistical methods (e.g., LISREL, Event History Analysis) and designs to analyze panel data in the health field.

HADM 763. Applied Health Services Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: HADM 761 and ECON 501, or permission of instructor. Seminar for Ph.D. students who have had courses in quantitative analysis of health care data and research methods. Develops framework for classifying the major topics and issues addressed by health services research. Explores the relationships between health services research, policy analysis and program evaluation. Emphasizes assessment of the effectiveness, efficiency and equity of the health system at various levels of analysis. Stresses the importance of conceptual modeling as a foundation to rigorous empirical research.

HADM 792. Independent Study in Health Services Organization and Research. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. Special study or research leading to a publication. Conducted under the guidance of a faculty sponsor.

HADM 793. Research Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. Available only to second year students. Supervised investigation of selected problems in health services research. Includes conducting and analyzing field research.

HADM 898. Doctoral Dissertation in Health Services Organization and Research. 1-9 Hours.

Semester course; 1-9 credits. A minimum of 9 semester hours required for Ph.D. degree. Prerequisite: Completion of required course work and comprehensive examination. Dissertation research under direction of faculty adviser.

HADM 899. Doctoral Dissertation in Health Services Organization and Research. 1-9 Hours.

Semester course; 1-9 credits. A minimum of 9 semester hours required for Ph.D. degree. Prerequisite: Completion of required course work and comprehensive examination. Dissertation research under direction of faculty adviser.

Health Administration/Executive (HADE)

HADE 602. Health Systems Organization, Financing and Performance. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Examines the structure, functioning and financing of the U.S. health services system. Emphasizes foundational concepts for understanding and analyzing patterns of health and illness; health care cost, quality, access and utilization; workforce; competition in health care markets; and supplier, provider and payer effectiveness and efficiency.

HADE 606. Health Care Managerial Accounting. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. A foundation course covering health care financial accounting, financial statement analysis, budgeting, reimbursement, costing and short-term decision making. Emphasizes accounting concepts and using financial data in management of providers and payers.

HADE 607. Financial Management in Health Organizations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Prerequisite: HADE 606. Examines theory and techniques of managerial corporate management as applied to health service providers and insurers including time value of money, working capital management, capital budgeting techniques, cash flow analysis and capital structure planning.

HADE 609. Managerial Epidemiology. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Focuses on analytical techniques to study and measure the health or populations and to evaluate programs. Topics covered include health status measurement, evaluation design and managerial applications of epidemiology.

HADE 610. Health Analytics and Decision Support. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: undergraduate course in statistics. Applications of analytics and decision support to health services institutions. Applications of operations research and industrial engineering techniques using large institutional data for health care planning, control and decision-making, including deterministic and stochastic decision analysis models and their use in health services administration.

HADE 611. Health Care Law and Bioethics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Presents elements of law and legal principles as they apply to the administration of hospitals and heath care systems. Emphasizes medical malpractice, medical-legal issues, informed consent, antitrust, heath care business law and bioethics. Provides a legal foundation for the practice of health administration and clinical ethics through the use of case law and case analysis.

HADE 612. Information Systems for Health Care Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; blended on-campus/online format. 3 credits. This course is restricted to majors only. Introduces and applies basic vocabulary, foundational principles and practical strategies associated with information systems relevant to the health care administrator. Examines health care information and information systems, technology standards and security, as well as management challenges.

HADE 614. Health Care Marketing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Fundamental theories, concepts and techniques of marketing applied to the distinctive properties of health care services. Emphasizes the role of marketing and aligning organizational capacity and health care needs; market analysis and planning; strategic marketing management; tactical marketing mix design; designing and managing service delivery systems and developing new offerings.

HADE 615. Health Care Politics and Policy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; blended on-campus/online format. 3 credits. Examines the political process with particular emphasis on the impact of politics on health care. Focuses on current political issues in the health field, examining conflicts and anticipating effects on the health system.

HADE 621. Advanced Medical Informatics: Technology, Strategy and Performance. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: HADE 612 and permission of the instructor. Focuses on using technology for improving operational efficiencies, quality of care and market competitiveness. Explores various application technologies within the framework of technology-strategy-performance including: telemedicine, cyber surgery, Web-enabled clinical information systems, clinical decision support systems, artificial intelligence and expert systems, and risk-adjusted outcome assessment systems.

HADE 624. Health Economics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Foundational concepts of microeconomic theory and their application in analyzing health care policy; understanding the structure and dynamics of health care markets; and monitoring and controlling the allocation of resources within health organizations.

HADE 646. Health Care Organization and Leadership. 3 Hours.

Semester course; blended on-campus/online format. 3 credits. Explores the challenges of managing and leading health care organizations in the 21st century. Introduces concepts, vocabulary and ways of thinking to enable students to be more effective and insightful participants in organizational life in health care. Intended to provide the student with the basic knowledge necessary to benefit from the more detailed and advanced courses that follow in the curriculum.

HADE 647. Management of Health Care Organizations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: HADE 646. Analyzes the current state of management study and practice with the objective of achieving a balanced development of both knowledge and skills in solving the operations problems of health institutions. Critically examines the managerial process with emphasis on leadership behavior and development, performance improvement, structure and purpose of health care organization subunits, interfunctional coordination, and organizational processes.

HADE 648. Strategic Management in Health Care Organizations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Focuses on the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of strategy in health care financing/delivery organizations. Emphasizes concepts dealing with industry structure; the strategic management process; achieving and sustaining competitive advantage.

HADE 649. Human Resources Management in Health Care. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Presents concepts in human resources management as applied to health care organizations. Explores relationships between human resources management and general management, nature of work and human resources, compensation and benefits, personnel planning, recruitment and selection, training and development, employee appraisal and discipline, organized labor issues, and employment and labor law.

HADE 681. Special Topics in Health Administration. 1-3 Hours.

Variable hours. 1-3 credits. Investigate a specialized content area in a semester-long, seminar format. Topics may change from semester to semester.

HADE 691. Health Care Organization Diagnosis and Planning. 3 Hours.

1 credit. Provides an opportunity for students to integrate as well as apply knowledge gleaned from prior course work and to share individual experiences in assessment of and correction of organizational problems that are either operational or strategic.

HADE 692. Independent Study in Health Administration. 1-5 Hours.

Variable hours. Variable credit. Offered in all semesters for students to investigate and study topics of major interest.

Nurse Anesthesia (NRSA)

NRSA 601. Principles and Practice of Nurse Anesthesia I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Introduces the nurse anesthesia graduate student to concepts necessary to plan and execute safe and individualized anesthetics. Covers formulation of the anesthesia care plan, anesthetic techniques, prevention of complications, fluid management, monitoring and utilization of anesthesia equipment.

NRSA 602. Principles and Practice of Nurse Anesthesia II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 3 credits. Second in a series of six principles and practice courses. Presents fundamental concepts and techniques essential to clinical anesthesia practice focusing on the theoretical and practical considerations involved in the administration and management of major nerve conduction anesthesia and acute pain management.

NRSA 603. Principles and Practice of Nurse Anesthesia III. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Third in a series of six principles and practice courses. Delineates techniques of anesthesia management that are considered situation specific for specialized procedures, diagnostic or individualized procedures including advanced airway management and anesthesia care individualized for the patient with cardiovascular and respiratory conditions.

NRSA 604. Principles and Practice of Nurse Anesthesia IV. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 semester hours. 2 credits. Fourth in a series of six principles and practice courses. Intensively covers the advanced concepts and principles of anesthetic management with an emphasis on pediatric, obstetric, endocrine and hematological disorders.

NRSA 605. Principles and Practice of Nurse Anesthesia V. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Fifth in a series of six principles and practice courses. Intensively covers the advanced concepts and principles of anesthetic management with an emphasis on neuro-anesthesia and anesthesia delivery in specialty settings.

NRSA 606. Principles and Practice of Nurse Anesthesia VI. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Last in a series of six principles and practice courses. Intensively covers the advanced concepts and principles of anesthetic management with an emphasis on crisis management.

NRSA 611. Advanced Physiological Concepts for the Nurse Anesthetist. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Analyzes complex relationships between body systems and anesthesia. Demonstrates how advanced concepts of physiology and biochemistry relate to concepts of anesthesia theory and practice.

NRSA 620. Advanced Health Assessment for Nurse Anesthetists I. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Provides a systematic approach to advanced health assessment emphasizing best research evidence, cultural competence and anesthetic implications. Accentuates advanced pre-operative and postoperative concepts, diagnosis and approaches for the assessment of human systems in the anesthesia setting focusing on the pulmonary (upper and lower airway), hematologic and vascular systems. Reviews cardinal techniques of inspection, palpation, percussion and auscultation.

NRSA 621. Advanced Health Assessment for Nurse Anesthetists II. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Provides a systematic approach to advanced health assessment emphasizing best research evidence, cultural competence and anesthetic implications. Accentuates advanced pre-operative and post-operative concepts, diagnosis and approaches for the assessment of human systems in the anesthesia setting focusing on the neurological, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and musculoskeletal systems.

NRSA 622. Clinical Practicum I-II. 1 Hour.

Continuous courses; 112 clock hours (I) and 3 lecture hours (II). 1 credit (I) and 3 credits (II). Introduces clinical care with supervised participation in actual administration of anesthesia. Demonstrates internalization of theoretical concepts and techniques and application in anesthetic management toward the achievement of the terminal objectives for competency in entry-level anesthesia practice. NRSA 623 graded as S/U/F.

NRSA 623. Clinical Practicum I-II. 3 Hours.

Continuous courses; 112 clock hours (I) and 3 lecture hours (II). 1 credit (I) and 3 credits (II). Introduces clinical care with supervised participation in actual administration of anesthesia. Demonstrates internalization of theoretical concepts and techniques and application in anesthetic management toward the achievement of the terminal objectives for competency in entry-level anesthesia practice. NRSA 623 graded as S/U/F.

NRSA 624. Clinical Practicum III. 6 Hours.

675 clock hours. 6 credits. Provides intensive experience in all clinical anesthesia areas. All course work represents an integral phase of sequenced clinical progress toward the achievement of competency in entry-level anesthesia practice. Includes clinical rotations to various affiliate sites to gain experience in management of specialized anesthetic considerations. Emphasis on greater responsibility for a total anesthetic regime along the educational experiential continuum.

NRSA 625. Clinical Practicum IV. 6 Hours.

675 clock hours. 6 credits. Provides intensive experience in all clinical anesthesia areas. All course work represents an integral phase of sequenced clinical progress toward the achievement of competency in entry-level anesthesia practice. Includes clinical rotations to various affiliate sites to gain experience in management of specialized anesthetic considerations. Emphasis on greater responsibility for a total anesthetic regime along the educational experiential continuum.

NRSA 626. Clinical Practicum V. 6 Hours.

675 clock hours. 6 credits. Provides intensive experience in all clinical anesthesia areas. All course work represents an integral phase of sequenced clinical progress toward the achievement of competency in entry-level anesthesia practice. Includes clinical rotations to various affiliate sites to gain experience in management of specialized anesthetic considerations. Emphasis on greater responsibility for a total anesthetic regime along the educational experiential continuum.

NRSA 627. Clinical Practicum VI. 6 Hours.

675 clock hours. 6 credits. Provides intensive experience in all clinical anesthesia areas. All course work represents an integral phase of sequenced clinical progress toward the achievement of competency in entry-level anesthesia practice. Includes clinical rotations to various affiliate sites to gain experience in management of specialized anesthetic considerations. Emphasis on greater responsibility for a total anesthetic regime along the educational experiential continuum.

NRSA 633. Pathophysiology for Nurse Anesthetists. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Covers various pathological conditions and diseases of specific concern to the anesthesia provider with an emphasis on cardiovascular, respiratory, excretory, endocrine, infectious diseases, nutritional, neuromuscular and neurological disorders.

NRSA 642. Professional Aspects of Anesthesia Practice I. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Provides the graduate nurse anesthesia student an opportunity to focus on a variety of professional issues including but not restricted to the history of nurse anesthesia, roles of the nurse anesthetist and the American Association of Nurse Anesthetists, professional involvement, governmental and nongovernmental regulations of nurse anesthesia practice and standards of care.

NRSA 645. Professional Aspects of Anesthesia Practice II. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Provides the graduate nurse anesthesia student an opportunity to focus on a variety of professional issues including but not restricted to health care delivery systems, assessing and selecting practice settings and employment options, medical ethics and chemical dependency.

NRSA 647. Professional Aspects of Anesthesia Practice III. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Provides the graduate nurse anesthesia student an opportunity to focus on a variety of professional issues including but not restricted to reimbursement, influencing health care policy, competence, quality assessment, risk management, departmental management, nurse anesthesia and the legal system, documentation of anesthesia care and current issues and their potential effects on the profession of nurse anesthesia.

NRSA 676. Teaching Methodologies for the Nurse Anesthetist. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Covers principles of teacher/learner communication, presentation strategies and methods of evaluation pertinent to nurse anesthesia education and includes instructional tools, their application and instructional design.

NRSA 683. Research Methods in Nurse Anesthesia Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Required of all nurse anesthesia students. Understands and applies the steps involved in the research process. Emphasizes concepts, procedures and processes appropriate for use in research. Develops a research proposal by exploring a topic in the area of anesthesiology. Applies inferential and advanced statistical tests to hypothetical data. Critically analyzes and evaluates anesthesia research studies.

NRSA 684. Evidence-based Decision Making in Nurse Anesthesia. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Focuses on providing a foundation in the literature relevant to nurse anesthesia practice. Emphasis placed on establishing a scientific framework for clinical interventions and critiquing the literature in a systematic fashion. Course will culminate in a broad overview of scientific foundations for nurse anesthesia practice in selected domains.

NRSA 701. Human Factors and Patient Safety for Nurse Anesthetists. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Explores the theoretical basis of human error, patient safety and quality assurance in anesthesia care. Introduces a systems approach to error investigation and analysis. Integrates concepts of teamwork, crisis management, simulation and monitoring systems in anesthesia practice. Crosslisted as: DNAP 701.

Nurse Anesthesia Lab (NRSZ)

NRSZ 601. Laboratory in Principles and Practice of Nurse Anesthesia I. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 3 laboratory hours. 1 credit. Provides the nurse anesthesia graduate student guided practical experience associated with those concepts presented in NRSA 601. Includes practice in and evaluation of task-specific skills in both simulated and actual operating room environments.

Nurse Anesthesia Practice (DNAP)

DNAP 701. Human Factors and Patient Safety for Nurse Anesthetists. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Explores the theoretical basis of human error, patient safety and quality assurance in anesthesia care. Introduces a systems approach to error investigation and analysis. Integrates concepts of teamwork, crisis management, simulation and monitoring systems in anesthesia practice. Crosslisted as: NRSA 701.

DNAP 702. Nurse Anesthesia Patient Safety Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: DNAP/NRSA 701. Focuses on analysis of adverse anesthesia events from a systems perspective, use of multidisciplinary teams to solve management problems and constructive techniques for communicating with patients, families and health care providers who are involved in medical errors.

DNAP 703. Health Services Delivery Systems for the Nurse Anesthetist. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides the necessary scientific foundation, both in theory and practice application, to explore the structure and function of the U.S. health care delivery system as it specifically relates to specialized nurse anesthesia practice, the components of select theories and the translation of these theories to practice.

DNAP 704. Advanced Physiology/Pathophysiology for Nurse Anesthetists I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines normal human physiology and pathophysiology using a body-systems approach, with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and cellular levels of organization. Includes analysis of cellular structure and function as well as the individual components of body systems.

DNAP 705. Advanced Physiology/Pathophysiology for Nurse Anesthetists II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: DNAP 704. Examines normal human physiology and pathophysiology using a body-systems approach with emphasis on the interrelationships between form and function at the gross and cellular levels of organization. Includes an analysis of cellular structure and function as well as the individual components of body systems. Incorporates an overview of genetics.

DNAP 706. Advanced Pharmacology for Nurse Anesthetists I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides an opportunity to focus on the advanced principles of anesthesia related to pharmacology. Presents in-depth material on the pharmacology of various classes of anesthetics and adjuvant therapeutics employed by nurse anesthetists, with an emphasis on general anesthetics.

DNAP 707. Advanced Pharmacology for Nurse Anesthetists II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: DNAP 706. Provides an opportunity to focus on the advanced principles of anesthesia-related pharmacology. Includes discussions on adjuvant therapeutics employed by nurse anesthetists, with an emphasis on local anesthetics.

DNAP 711. Policy and Practice for Nurse Anesthetists. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines governmental and non-governmental issues that influence nurse anesthesia practice. Focuses on developing skills that contribute to leadership and personal effectiveness in impletmenting change in nurse anesthesia and health care. Emphasizes interdisciplinary relationships between CRNAs, nurses, physicians, administrators, policy-makers and other key stakeholders.

DNAP 712. Leadership in Nurse Anesthesia Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines principles of teaching and learning applicable to the anesthesia didactic and clinical environment. Presents strategies in teacher/learner communication, presentation development and strategies, curriculum design and methods of evaluation pertinent to nurse anesthesia education.

DNAP 716. Advanced Chemistry and Physics Concepts for Nurse Anesthetists. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Provides advanced theoretical foundations of chemistry, biochemistry and physics relevant for critical application to the practice of anesthesia nursing utilizing the hybrid (blended learning) format.

DNAP 717. Advanced Physiological Concepts for Nurse Anesthetists. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Explores properties of advanced physiology including physiology terms, levels of organization of the human body, homeostasis and feedback systems, anatomic terms, planes and sections, cell physiology and diffusion, transport systems, pressure-volume relationships, pressure-flow-resistance relationships, Fick’s principle, the Frank-Starling relationship, and math for physiology utilizing the hybrid (blended learning) format.

DNAP 718. Advanced Health Assessment for Nurse Anesthetists. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides a systematic, evidence-based, advanced physical, psychosocial and cultural evaluation of human systems to acquire and analyze relevant information for the development of a comprehensive patient assessment. Emphasizes advanced preoperative and postoperative techniques in a process whereby the learner translates information pertinent to anesthesia care into practice. Focuses on the symptom and health problem assessment and selection and interpretation of screening and diagnostic tests in order to implement an informed plan of care. Utilizes the hybrid (blended learning) format.

DNAP 721. Clinical Practicum I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 300 clocked clinical hours. 3 credits. Introduces clinical care with supervised participation in actual administration of anesthesia. Demonstrates internalization of theoretical concepts and techniques and application in anesthetic management toward the achievement of the terminal objectives for competency in entry-level anesthesia practice. Graded S/U/F.

DNAP 722. Clinical Practicum II. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 400 clocked clinical hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: DNAP 721. Introduces clinical care with supervised participation in actual administration of anesthesia. Demonstrates internalization of theoretical concepts and techniques and application in anesthetic management toward the achievement of the terminal objectives for competency in entry-level anesthesia practice. Graded S/U/F.

DNAP 723. Clinical Practicum III. 5 Hours.

Semester course; 500 clocked hours. 5 credits. Prerequisite: DNAP 722. Provides intensive experience in all clinical anesthesia areas. Represents an integral phase of sequenced clinical progress toward the achievement of competency in entry-level anesthesia practice. Includes clinical rotations to various affiliate sites to gain experience in management of specialized anesthetic considerations. Emphasizes increased responsibility for the delivery of a comprehensive anesthetic regime along the educational/experiential continuum. Graded S/U/F.

DNAP 724. Clinical Practicum IV. 5 Hours.

Semester course; 500 clocked clinical hours. 5 credits. Prerequisite: DNAP 723. Provides intensive experience in all clinical anesthesia areas. Represents an integral phase of sequenced clinical progress toward the achievement of competency in entry-level anesthesia practice. Includes clinical rotations to various affiliate sites to gain experience in management of specialized anesthetic considerations. Emphasizes increased responsibility for the delivery of a comprehensive anesthetic regime along the educational/experiential continuum. Graded S/U/F.

DNAP 725. Clinical Practicum V. 5 Hours.

Semester course; 500 clocked clinical hours. 5 credits. Prerequisite: DNAP 724. Provides intensive experience in all clinical anesthesia areas. Represents an integral phase of sequenced clinical progress toward the achievement of competency in entry-level anesthesia practice. Includes clinical rotations to various affiliate sites to gain experience in management of specialized anesthetic considerations. Emphasizes increased responsibility for the delivery of a comprehensive anesthetic regime along the educational/experiential continuum. Graded S/U/F.

DNAP 731. Professional Aspects of Nurse Anesthesia Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides an opportunity to focus on a variety of professional issues including but not restricted to the history of nurse anesthesia, professional practice roles, settings and responsibilities of the nurse anesthetist, effective communications, accountability and patient advocacy, cultural competency, professional involvement, code of ethics, regulations, and standards of practice using a hybrid (blended learning) format.

DNAP 733. Evidence-based Decision-making in Nurse Anesthesia. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides a foundation of literature relevant to nurse anesthesia practice. Emphasizes a systematic framework that is termed “evidence-based practice” for clinical interventions and critiquing the literature in an appropriate and manageable fashion. Culminates in a broad overview of scientific foundations for nurse anesthesia practice in selected domains. Utilizes the hybrid (blended learning) format.

DNAP 734. Research Methods and Statistical Measures in Nurse Anesthesia Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines relationships among theory, research and causal inference; quantitative and qualitative methodologies will be considered. Surveys issues relevant to research design, measurement, data collection, statistical analysis, interpretation and ethical issues in conducting research — and grounded in work in the domain of anesthesia and critical care. Prepares students to access, critically evaluate and utilize research-based literature and independently initiate a systematic approach to addressing a research hypothesis or research question. Utilizes a hybrid (blended learning) format.

DNAP 735. Principles and Practice of Nurse Anesthesia Practice I. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Introduces the nurse anesthesia student to concepts necessary to plan and execute safe and individualized anesthetics. Covers formulation of the anesthesia care plan, anesthetic techniques, prevention of complications, fluid management, monitoring and utilization of anesthesia equipment. Provides guided practical experience associated with course concepts, including practice with and evaluation of task-specific skills in both simulated and actual operating room environments.

DNAP 736. Principles and Practice of Nurse Anesthesia II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: DNAP 735. Delineates techniques of anesthesia management that are considered situation-specific for specialized procedures, diagnostic or individualized procedures, including advanced airway management and anesthesia care individualized for the patient with cardiovascular or respiratory conditions.

DNAP 737. Principles and Practice of Nurse Anesthesia III. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: DNAP 736. Presents fundamental concepts and techniques essential to clinical anesthesia practice focusing on the theoretical and practical considerations involved in the administration and management of regional anesthesia and pain management.

DNAP 738. Principles and Practice of Nurse Anesthesia IV. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: DNAP 737. Covers the advanced concepts and principles of anesthetic management in obstetrics, pediatrics, hematologic disorders and endocrine disorders.

DNAP 739. Principles and Practice of Nurse Anesthesia V. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: DNAP 738. Covers the advanced concepts and principles of anesthetic management including anesthesia delivery in specialty settings and other specialty topics.

DNAP 789. Nurse Anesthesia Professional Practice. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; variable clinical hours. 1-6 credits (100 clinical hours per credit). May be repeated up to six credits. Emphasizes analysis and evaluation of experiential learning through the use of critical thinking skills and reflection. Explores concepts of competency and expertise. Focuses on methods of determining best anesthesia practices through identification of problems, review and systematic evaluation of current research, and consideration of economic and other factors that may impact patient outcomes. Graded as S, U or F.

DNAP 799. Nurse Anesthesia Capstone Project. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-6 credits. May be repeated up to six credits. Prerequisites: DNAP 701 and ALHP 708. Focuses on identification of relevant clinical issues in anesthesiology with attendant formulation of critically applicable questions and examination of the relevant research evidence that addresses those questions. Students implement and evaluate a terminal project and disseminate the results through an oral and/or poster presentation, manuscript submission to a peer-reviewed journal or another appropriate medium. Graded as S, U or F.

Occupational Therapy (OCCT)

OCCT 520. Occupational Therapy Applications: Kinesiology. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 2 credits. Addresses basic components of motion, biomechanics, joint structure, specific muscle groups and muscle function. Analyzes functional activities necessary to carry out the tasks and roles of productive living using these principles.

OCCT 521. Neuroscience Applications to Occupational Therapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 lab hours, 3 credit hours. Links basic structure and organization of nervous system to function in typical individuals. Examines neuroscience correlates of diseases and disabilities. Relies on current review of neuroscience literature in matching function and dysfunction with structure and organization. Case examples across the life span used to understand these potential relationships and link material to OT theories and frames of reference guiding practice.

OCCT 522. Interdisciplinary Medical Lectures. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Presents information on medical conditions commonly seen by occupational therapists, providing diagnostic features, associated conditions, prevalence and course for each. Addresses value and limitations of this knowledge to occupational therapy process, and need for therapists to search out information about other conditions. Introduces medical terminology and therapeutic uses, side effects and precautions of medication. Describes occupational therapy interventions and clinical pathways for certain impairments.

OCCT 530. Nature of Occupational Therapy. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Provides an overview of fundamentals of occupational therapy through use of official documents of the American Occupational Therapy Association and other authoritative sources. Introduces practice definitions, philosophical and ethical underpinnings, professional roles, and organizations in the field of occupational therapy.

OCCT 531. Interpersonal Communication and Group Dynamics. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 2 credits. Introduces oral and written communication skills and group process techniques. Addresses interpersonal relationships, principles of therapeutic involvement, observation, analysis of communication patterns, interview methods and OT terminology. Provides experiences in group leadership, assertiveness techniques. Laboratory exercises chart path of personal development, professional socialization.

OCCT 532. Life Span Occupational Development. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Explores principles and theories of normal growth and development and their influence on occupational performance across the life span. Presents all domains of development and life span roles. Focuses on work/productivity, leisure/play and activities for daily living. Explores importance of significant others and environment, maintaining balance between performance areas and fulfilling expected and desired social roles. Stresses influence of temporal and environmental contexts.

OCCT 533. Occupational Therapy Principles, Values and Theories. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 4 lecture hours. 4 credits. Examines theoretical constructs used in various models of occupational therapy practice along with legislation, advocacy and empowerment using an historical framework. Addresses influence of legislation relevant to clients and the profession, their dynamic impact on practice patterns and advocacy issues. Emphasizes concepts integral to understanding and using human occupation as a basis for practice as well as the dynamic relationship among occupational therapy principles, values and theories.

OCCT 534. Occupational Therapy Evaluation and Intervention Overview. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Provides an introduction to evaluation and the intervention process as it relates to performance components, areas and contexts. Focuses on general evaluation of assessments for various treatment settings and environments. Emphasis on use of assessment data to determine appropriate treatment intervention and discharge planning for individuals. Verbal communications and written documentation will be covered.

OCCT 580. Introduction to the Profession of Occupational Therapy. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 2 credits. Provides an overview of fundamentals of occupational therapy through use of the Official Documents of the American Occupational Therapy Association and other authoritative sources. Introduces practice definitions, philosophical and ethical underpinnings, professional roles and organizations, and the clinical reasoning process, as well as characteristics and values recommended for successful performance as a professional occupational therapist.

OCCT 589. Advanced Functional Anatomy. 5 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 laboratory hours. 5 credits. Taught as an intensive six-week course with one lecture and three lab hours, five days a week. Addresses the anatomy of the human body relevant to occupational therapy practice including, but not limited to, the skeletal system, muscle tissue and the muscular system, and the cardiovascular system. Anatomical/medical terminology including anatomical planes, anatomical position, abbreviation of terms and terms of movement are covered.

OCCT 590. Functional Movement Analysis in Occupational Therapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: OCCT 589. Addresses kinesiology and functional anatomy including the basic components of palpation, joint structure and the study of kinematics, specific muscle groups and muscle function. Functional activities necessary to carry out the tasks and roles of productive living are analyzed and emphasized using these principles.

OCCT 591. Neuroscience Applications to Occupational Therapy. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Lab focuses on structures, basic function and inter-relationships; lecture addresses structure-function relationships, system organization and structure relationships, and higher order functions in the typical nervous system. Case examples across the lifespan will link function with dysfunction, and application to injury, disorder, disease processes common to occupational therapy practice. Course relies on a current review of neuroscience literature in matching function and dysfunction with structure and organization.

OCCT 592. Introduction to Injury, Illness and Disability. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Presents information on medical conditions commonly seen by occupational therapists, providing diagnostic features, associated conditions, prevalence and course of disease for each. Addresses value and limitations of this knowledge to the occupational therapy process and need for therapists to search out information about other conditions. Introduces medical terminology and therapeutic uses, side effects, and precautions of medication. Describes occupational therapy interventions for certain impairments.

OCCT 593. Analysis of Human Occupation. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 2 laboratory hours. 1 credit. Prerequisite: OCCT 580. Explores activities and occupation and related professional terminology, activity analysis and therapy as a teaching/learning process. Emphasizes analysis of occupational performance skills and the transaction between client factors, activity demands and context.

OCCT 594. Theoretical Foundations of Occupational Therapy. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 4 lecture hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: OCCT 580. Examines theoretical constructs underlying occupational therapy practice. Uses a historical framework to critically examine the ideas put forth by earlier frames of reference and current conceptual models of practice. Emphasizes concepts integral to the understanding and use of human occupation as a basis for practice as well as the dynamic relationships among occupational therapy principles, values and theories.

OCCT 613. Adult Occupational Performance I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: OCCT 592. Examines adult evaluation and treatment fundamentals that support occupational performance interventions. Covers evaluation and treatment content underlying and applicable to all areas of occupational performance. Includes specific assessments, practical information on understanding clients with a variety of conditions and therapist skills.

OCCT 614. Pediatric Occupational Performance I. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 4 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: OCCT 522. Focuses on occupational performance of young children (infants, toddlers and preschoolers) with disabilities. Explores principles and theories of normal development as a baseline for identifying the impact of illness, injury or environmental factors on occupational engagement. Examines a variety of frames of reference, evaluative and intervention approaches for children and their families in medical, home, community and educational settings. Uses a holistic approach to develop a child's abilities to engage in their occupations while meeting expectations of family and environment.

OCCT 615. Level I Fieldwork in Occupational Therapy. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 54 clinical hours. 1 credit. Enriches classroom learning by providing directed observation and participation in clinical practice settings. Provides experiences supervised by professionals working in one of a variety of clinical settings (e.g., early intervention, schools, hospitals, nursing homes, home health agencies or mental health settings). Arranges placements to complement the treatment intervention courses. Prepares students for the more complex level II fieldwork clinical experience.

OCCT 616. Research Process in Occupational Therapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Covers basic steps in research process, including problem definition, literature review, design, data collection and analysis, and dissemination of findings. Addresses qualitative and quantitative research approaches, critical analysis of literature and reviews statistical concepts.

OCCT 617. Therapeutic Process in Occupational Therapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Focuses on essential knowledge of therapeutic use of self, group process techniques, interview methods, therapist interaction skills, assessment of process and social interaction occupational performance skills, and individual and group intervention applicable to core and specialty psychosocial practice with youth and adults in support of participation in occupation.

OCCT 620. Occupational Therapy Practice Activities I: Activity Analysis. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 2 laboratory hours. 1 credit. Explores activities and occupation and related professional terminology, activity analysis, and therapy as a teaching/learning process. Emphasizes analysis of occupational performance skills and the transaction between client factors, activity demands and context.

OCCT 621. Occupational Therapy Practice Activities II: Assistive Technologies. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 2 laboratory hours. 1 credit. Focuses on the evaluation, activity analysis and intervention process with a range of assistive technology, including software, hardware and low-tech solutions. Includes the development of skills for adaptation of activities and contexts.

OCCT 623. Occupational Therapy Practice Activities III: Activity and Occupational Synthesis. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 2 laboratory hours. 1 credit. Emphasizes altering, adapting and modifying activities and contexts to increase occupational performance. Includes experiential learning in the community and exposure to adapted leisure activities.

OCCT 630. Adult Evaluation and Intervention I: Foundations. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 2 credits. Examines adult evaluation and treatment fundamentals that support occupational performance interventions. Covers evaluations and treatment content underlying and applicable to all areas of occupational performance. Includes specific assessments, practical information on understanding clients with a variety of conditions and therapist skills.

OCCT 633. Adult Evaluation and Intervention II: Facilitating Function With Disability Across the Continuum of Care. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 4 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Introduces students to assessment and intervention strategies, tools and equipment typically used in adult physical disability settings across the continuum of care. Focuses on occupational performance while considering client factors, tasks and context. Draws on practical experience and application of materials taught in previous adult physical disability course work. Working with the instructor, clinical faculty and people with disabilities in laboratory and lecture sessions, utilizes clinical reasoning skills, technologies and strategies typically employed to treat a variety of adult functional disability conditions across the continuum of care, including ADL, IADL, community living vocational training, play and leisure.

OCCT 635. Psychosocial Evaluation and Intervention I: Foundations. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 2 credits. Examines fundamental knowledge of adolescent and adult psychosocial evaluation and intervention to support adaptation and participation in occupation. Includes core and specialty practice psychosocial knowledge, information on stigma and stereotyping, therapist skills, specific assessments and interventions, and leadership of a community-based group intervention.

OCCT 636. Fieldwork I in Psychosocial Occupational Therapy. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 1.5 lecture and .5 clinical hours. 2 credits. Focuses on occupational performance of adolescents and adults with psychosocial dysfunction. Provides service-learning fieldwork I experiences applying clinical reasoning, and conceptual practice models to plan, implement and evaluate evidence-based intervention in community-based mental health settings. Preliminary step to the more complex level II fieldwork experience.

OCCT 640. Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention I: Infant and Preschool Children. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Focuses on occupational performance of infants, toddlers and preschoolers with disabilities. Explores a variety of frames of reference and evaluative and intervention approaches for children and their families in medical, home, community and educational settings. Uses a holistic approach to develop child's abilities to play/perform basic ADLs while meeting expectations of family and environment.

OCCT 641. Pediatric Evaluation and Intervention II: Ages 6 to 12. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 4 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Focuses on occupational performance of children with disabilities ages six through adolescence. Explores a variety of frames of reference, evaluative and intervention approaches for children, their families in multiple practice arenas emphasizing the child's performance in educational settings. Uses a holistic approach to develop child's competence in school, activities of daily living, play, work and community while meeting expectations of family and environment. Includes field-based experiences.

OCCT 650. Occupational Therapy in Health Care. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Introduces contemporary issues, trends in occupational therapy health-care settings. Covers principles of managed care and impact on occupational therapy practice. Focuses on changes in practice sites, service delivery models and patient demographics. Emphasizes how occupational therapists can influence health policy, advocate for change and address emerging professional ethical issues. Encourages consideration of integrating holistic/biopsychosocial nature of occupational therapy into biomedical health-care systems.

OCCT 651. Administration and Supervision of Occupational Therapy Services. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Covers management of human and non-human resources to provide efficient and effective occupational therapy services; nature of formal and informal organizations, administrative process and administrative tasks. Includes supervision, consultation and the planning of occupational therapy fieldwork education.

OCCT 654. Children and Young Adult Advanced Assistive Technology Applications in Occupational Therapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Provides an in-depth view of assistive technology and human-environment/technology interface for children and young adults. Focuses on the use of AT in occupational therapy evaluation and intervention. Exposes students to tools and strategies for integrating computer hardware and software, augmentative communication devices, ECUs, powered mobility, toys and low technology solutions into home, school, recreation, community and work environments. Requires student problem-solving relative to their area of pediatric or young adult research and clinical practice.

OCCT 655. Older Adult Advanced Assistive Technology Application in Occupational Therapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Provides an in-depth view of assistive technology and human-environment/technology interface for older adults with disabilities. Focuses on use of assistive technology in occupational therapy evaluation and intervention. Exposes occupational therapy students to tools and strategies for integrating environmental control units, powered mobility, computer hardware and software, augmentative communication devices, low vision, hearing impaired and low technology solutions into the lives of elderly assistive technology consumers. Requires students to problem solve within their area of gerontology research and clinical practice.

OCCT 656. Advanced Neuroscience Applications in Occupational Therapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Requires instructor's permission for non-occupational therapy majors. Briefly reviews basic structure and organization of nervous system in typical individuals. Emphasizes student examination of current neuroscience literature relative to diseases and disabilities encountered in clinical practice, matching function and dysfunction with structure and organization. Students explore individual topics of interest; present to other professionals. Addresses specific cases from participants' clinical and professional experience, and links this to contemporary OT theories and frames of reference guiding practice.

OCCT 660. Level I Fieldwork in Occupational Therapy. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 45 clinical/seminar hours. 1 credit. Enriches classroom learning by providing directed observation and participation in clinical practice settings. Provides experiences supervised by professionals working in one of a variety of clinical settings (e.g., early intervention, schools, hospitals, nursing homes, home health agencies or mental health settings). Placements arranged to complement the treatment/intervention courses. A preliminary step to the more complex Level II Fieldwork clinical experience.

OCCT 661. Occupational Therapy in the Schools. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Registration open to other professional students with permission of the instructor. Studies the roles and functions of occupational therapists in school settings as defined by the educational model, government regulations and service provision patterns. Emphasizes person-centered planning, parent and professional collaboration and educationally relevant approaches. Integrates the use of research and clinical reasoning to provide occupation-based practice for students with disabilities of all ages.

OCCT 662. Neuroscience Review and Sensory Integration. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Reviews neuroscience basics related to function and dysfunction. Overviews brain structures and function on both gross and cellular levels. Examination of the sensory integration neuroscience theory base which provides foundation for additional study of brain structure as it relates to function and dysfunction. Links understanding of neuroscience with occupation and occupational performance.

OCCT 663. Beyond the Basics: Advanced Evaluation and Intervention in Pediatric Occupational Therapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Restricted to post-professional master's level students. Provides in-depth view of selected occupational therapy assessment and intervention techniques for children and youth with disabilities. Exposes students to practical tools and strategies for integrating treatment into home, school, recreation, community and work environments. Requires students to investigate their own clinical reasoning skills relative to their area of pediatric interest, clinical practice and research. Specifically focuses on use of sensory integration theory and practice for infants and children, issues related to feeding and play, and the transition of adolescents with disabilities into postsecondary, work and community environments.

OCCT 670. Case-based Clinical Reasoning in Occupational Therapy. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 4 laboratory hours. 2 credits. Utilizes case studies to develop clinical reasoning skills and examine evaluation and treatment alternatives for persons with occupational performance limitations. Focuses on life-span development issues. Uses cases designed to integrate and develop strategies based on previously presented material. Incorporates assistive technology as an intervention tool into the case-based learning process. Graded as Pass/Fail.

OCCT 671. Advanced Theory in Occupational Therapy. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; 1-4 lecture hours. 1-4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. Integrates examination of historical and current theoretical constructs reflected in professional literature and published conceptual models of practice with the clinical expertise of experienced occupational therapists. Examines the clinical reasoning process and fosters high-level theoretical and clinical thinking. Builds upon entry-level study of theory to emphasize dynamic relationship between theory, clinical reasoning and client-based and occupation-based practice.

OCCT 673. Health Care Delivery and Occupational Therapy Practice Models. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to post-professional master's level students. Introduces contemporary issues and trends in occupational therapy health-care settings. Covers principles of managed care and impact on occupational therapy practice. Focuses on changes in practice sites, service delivery models and patient demographics. Emphasizes on how occupational therapy influences health policy, advocates change and addresses emerging professional and ethical issues. Encourages consideration of integrating holistic/biopsychosocial nature of occupational therapy into biomedically oriented health-care system.

OCCT 680. Level II Fieldwork in Occupational Therapy: A. 1-9 Hours.

Semester course; students must complete 480 clinical hours. Variable credit. Maximum of 9 credits per semester. Clinical experience must be different from that offered in OCCT 681. Expands experience in delivering occupational therapy services to a variety of individuals across the lifespan and in a variety of settings. Promotes interpretation of previously learned skills and knowledge through clinical reasoning and reflective practice. Extends skills of professionalism and competence as entry-level occupational therapists. Graded as P/F or PR.

OCCT 681. Level II Fieldwork in Occupational Therapy: B. 1-9 Hours.

Semester course; students must complete 480 clinical hours. Variable credit. Maximum of 9 credits per semester. Clinical experience must be different from that offered in OCCT 680. Expands experience in delivering occupational therapy services to a variety of individuals across the lifespan and in a variety of settings. Promotes interpretation of previously learned skills and knowledge through clinical reasoning and reflective practice. Extends skills of professionalism and competence as entry-level occupational therapists. Graded as P/F or PR.

OCCT 685. Advanced Clinical Reasoning: Asking the Right Questions. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides foundation and understanding of the source of clinical reasoning as a basis of clinical practice in occupational therapy through case-based learning. Promotes clinical reasoning within the practice of occupational therapy, bridging practice theories, evidence-based practice and clinical skills. Requires examination of existing knowledge and data, and development of a clinical project proposal.

OCCT 686. Advanced Clinical Reasoning Applications. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: OCCT 685 Forms the application component of clinical reasoning process; offers opportunity to experience clinically based project implementation within the context of ongoing practice. Facilitates mentoring relationships with colleagues in an identified specialty area to promote leadership in clinical reasoning. Implements project proposals developed in OCCT 685; data will be collected, interpreted and summarized.

OCCT 689. Occupational Therapy Assessment and Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: OCCT 592. Provides introduction to evaluation and intervention process as it relates to areas of occupation, occupational performance skills (i.e., motor, process and social interaction), client factors and context. Focuses on general evaluation of assessments for various clients, treatment settings and environments. Emphasizes oral and written communication, accurate documentation and use of assessment data to develop appropriate treatment intervention and discharge planning for individuals.

OCCT 690. Occupational Therapy Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

Variable hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. Investigation, presentation and discussion of current problems and issues in the field of occupational therapy.

OCCT 691. Special Topics in Occupational Therapy. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. Designed around the interests of students, faculty expertise, and availability and expertise of Richmond-area occupational therapists or visiting lecturers. Format may include intensive mini-courses or workshops, an advanced course with some opportunity for election and development of knowledge and skills in a specialized area of occupational therapy.

OCCT 692. Assistive Technologies for Occupational Engagement. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 4 laboratory hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: OCCT 593. Focuses on the evaluation, activity analysis and intervention process with a range of assistive technology, including software, hardware and low-tech solutions. Includes the development of skills for adaptation of activities and contexts.

OCCT 693. Occupational Synthesis and Adaptations. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture 2 lab hours. 2 credits. Prerequisites: OCCT 593 and 692. Builds upon activity analysis skills. Emphasizes altering, adapting and modifying activities and contexts to promote increased occupational performance. Includes development of planning and construction skills, experiential learning and exposure to adapted leisure activities in the community, and design and production of an adaptive project for an individual with a disability, therapist or facility.

OCCT 695. Fieldwork: Specialty (Optional). 1-9 Hours.

Twelve weeks full-time experience in programs providing occupational therapy services. 1-9 credits. Minimum total required for all fieldwork courses is 18 semester hours. Determination of the amount of credit and permission of the instructor and department chair must be secured prior to registration for the course. Supervised fieldwork experiences are arranged in various settings for the application of academically acquired knowledge. Placements include experiences in prevention, health maintenance, remediation, daily life tasks and vocational adjustment. Fieldwork settings may include hospitals, rehabilitation centers, school systems, community agencies, camping programs, penal systems and the like. Fieldwork experiences are arranged individually, but placement in a specified location cannot be guaranteed. In the event of failure, the course may be repeated only upon recommendation by the academic and clinical faculty. Fieldwork must be completed no later than 24 months following completion of the academic phase.

OCCT 697. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

1-3 credits. The student will submit a proposal for investigating some area or problem in occupational therapy not ordinarily included in the regular curriculum. The student's desired study must be described in a contract written by the student and approved by the faculty member. The results of the study will be presented in a written or oral report.

OCCT 698. Research in Occupational Therapy. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. Completion of a proposal for a research project relevant to occupational therapy.

OCCT 700. Enabling Occupational Performance: The Canadian Perspective. 3 Hours.

International study course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Introduces guiding principles for enabling occupation within a Canadian context. Examines client-centered practice from perspective of Canandian occupational therapists and publications by the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists. Focuses on theory and implementation. Characteristics of components of the Canadian Occupational Performance Moded will be examined as determinants of health, well-being and participation of individuals, groups and communities. Examines issues pertaining to Canadian society, culture and history, trends that have affected the Canadian health and social services system, and comparisons between Canadian and American systems. Course takes place in summer semester in London, Ontario, Canada.

OCCT 709. Research Process and Statistical Analysis in Occupational Therapy. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 4 lecture hours. 4 credits. Restricted to entry-level master's students. Prepares students to write research proposal for completion of the requirements of the master's degree. Covers basic steps in research process, including problem definition, literature review, design, data collection and analysis, and dissemination of findings. Students will demonstrate understanding of statistical analysis after completing a review of introductory statistical concepts. Addresses quantitative and qualitative approaches. Students will review and critically analyze literature in preparation for subsequent research experiences.

OCCT 710. Quantitative Research Processes. 3-4 Hours.

Semester course; 3-4 lecture hours. 3-4 credits. Prepares students as critical consumers of research. Provides overview to basic steps in research process, including problem definition, literature review, design, data collection and data dissemination. Students critically analyze each step and compare across different examples. Discussion of strengths and weaknesses in all areas of research. Focus on quantitative approaches with general introduction to basics of qualitative research for comparison.

OCCT 711. Research Process in Occupational Therapy: Qualitative Methods. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Introduces qualitative methods of research with goals of understanding the theoretical underpinnings, gaining practical experience and developing an understanding of the "self" as an instrument. Focuses on qualitative methods in occupational therapy research and their application to practice.

OCCT 713. Adult Occupational Performance II. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 4 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: OCCT 613. Expands the depth and breadth of content introduced in prerequisite course. Analyzes assessment and intervention strategies, tools and equipment typically used in adult occupational therapy settings across the continuum of care. Examines evaluation and treatment of functional disability for adults in clinical and natural environments. Focuses on occupational performance, while considering client factors, tasks and context. Stresses application of knowledge of clinical reasoning, theoretical practice models and cultural and contextual issues in evaluating and planning treatment.

OCCT 714. Pediatric Occupational Performance II. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 4 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: OCCT 614. Focuses on occupational performance of children with disabilities ages 6 through adolescence. Explores a variety of frames of reference and evaluative and intervention approaches for children and their families in multiple practice arenas, emphasizing the child's performance in educational settings. Uses a holistic approach to develop the child's competence in school, activities of daily living, play, work and community while meeting expectations of family and environment. Includes field-based experiences.

OCCT 715. Level I Fieldwork in Occupational Therapy. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 54 clinical hours. 1 credit. Enriches classroom learning by providing directed observation and participation in clinical practice settings. Provides experiences supervised by professionals working in one of a variety of clinical settings (e.g., early intervention, schools, hospitals, nursing homes, home health agencies or mental health settings). Arranges placements to complement the treatment intervention courses. Prepares students for the more complex level II fieldwork clinical experience.

OCCT 716. Evidence-based Practice in Occupational Therapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines one of the roots of clinical practice: the existence of evidence. Provides an overview of evidence-based practice in general, and more specifically, in occupational therapy. Emphasizes in-depth information on levels of evidence, developing practice questions and understanding available resources. Analyzing existing evidence is included. Addresses clinical application and resources for further study. Emphasizes practical application of EBP concepts to OT, laying groundwork for best practice.

OCCT 717. Level I Fieldwork in Psychosocial Occupational Therapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: OCCT 617. Focuses on occupational performance of adolescents and adults with psychosocial dysfunction. Provides service learning level I fieldwork experiences to apply knowledge of clinical reasoning and conceptual practice models to plan, implement and evaluate evidence-based group intervention in community-based mental health settings. Prepares students for the more complex level II fieldwork clinical experience.

OCCT 720. Policy, Advocacy and Management for Occupational Therapy Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Addresses the principles and application of leadership and management skills within the context of occupational therapy services, federal and state legislation and regulations, national requirements, and the various contexts of service delivery. Focuses on knowledge and skills for the management of human and nonhuman resources for efficient and effective occupational therapy services. Evaluates contemporary policy issues, including trends in occupational therapy settings. Covers principles of reimbursement systems with analysis on the impact on occupational therapy practice. Focuses on changes in practice sites, service delivery models and patient demographics. Emphasizes how occupational therapists can influence policy, advocate for change and address emerging professional ethical issues. Encourages consideration of integrating holistic/biopsychosocial nature of occupational therapy into biomedical health care systems.

OCCT 721. Clinical Reasoning in Occupational Therapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 4 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: OCCT 617, OCCT 713, OCCT 714. Utilizes case studies to develop clinical reasoning skills and examine evaluation and treatment alternatives for persons with occupational performance limitations. Focuses on lifespan development issues. Uses cases designed to integrate and develop strategies based on previously presented material.

OCCT 729. Research Practicum. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. Supervised investigation of selected problems in occupational therapy. Exposes students to varied tasks integral to research implementation. Addresses overall research design and implementation process and skills needed for publication and presentation of research. Students complete an individualized learning contract. Graded as "S," "U" or "F.

OCCT 735. Evidence Bases for Occupational Therapy Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines one of the roots of clinical practice: the existence of evidence. Provides an overview of evidence-based practice (EBP) in general and, more specifically, in occupational therapy. Provides in-depth information on levels of evidence; developing practice questions, understanding available resources and analyzing existing evidence is included. Ties in with clinical reasoning skills, extending them to understanding the literature. Clinical application and resources for further study will be addressed. Emphasis on practical application of EBP concepts to OT, laying groundwork for best practice.

OCCT 736. Developing Fundable Projects. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines the environment and opportunities for seeking and obtaining external funding in the area of health-related sciences. Will address proposals for program development and evaluation, training and research. Studies components of typical proposals and supports proposal development by student. Analyzes and critiques student proposals using both peer and instructor review. Discusses relationships between proposal writing and leadership skills and knowledge.

OCCT 739. Program Development and Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Explores basic program development, program evaluation and needs-assessment methods necessary for developing upcoming capstone leadership projects. Focuses on conceptualization, design, models and approaches, and operational procedures used in program development and evaluation. Presents the planning and evaluation cycle, categories of evaluation, program development models and needs-assessment techniques used in creating programs. Explores ideas for program development from a variety of perspectives, including potential for evaluation of processes and outcomes, social and clinical indicators of need, asset mapping, and potential impact of the program. Emphasizes the roles of key stakeholders, regulatory bodies and evaluators, development and use of program theory, and dissemination of evaluation results for improvement of programs and policies.

OCCT 740. Concepts in Disability Leadership for Occupational Therapists. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides basic descriptions of leadership and innovation, especially as they apply to the disability community, and presents theoretical concepts of organizational leadership. Presents concepts of change in organizational, community, political and social action/social movement contexts. This is the first of a series of three courses on leadership in disability for occupational therapists.

OCCT 741. Disability Leadership Applications for Occupational Therapists. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Fosters development of skills needed to assume leadership roles in disability-related areas of practice by creating detailed proposals for the practicum in disability leadership for occupational therapists, to be implemented in the third course in the series. Students increase understanding of leadership concepts by conducting needs assessments and collecting other pilot data in community settings that provide services for people with disabilities. The second of a series of three courses on leadership in disability for occupational therapists, course focuses on application of theoretical concepts learned in the first leadership course.

OCCT 742. Practicum in Leadership for Occupational Therapists. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Builds leadership skills in occupational therapists for work in health care, education and disability-focused organizations. Emphasizes relationships with other professionals, governing boards, regulatory bodies and other key stakeholders through an identified and pre-approved leadership project. Promotes exploration of personal styles of leadership. Serves as applied practicum course in leadership development.

OCCT 743. Synthesis and Evaluation of Capstone Leadership Project. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Culminating course in the four-part leadership series. Focuses on synthesis and evaluation of capstone leadership project. Leads to assessment and critique of project implementation through compilation and analysis of project results. Re-examines leadership theories, personal leadership styles and their relationship to program outcomes. Proposes and critiques resources for project sustainability, clinical application and dissemination. Requires written and verbal presentation of final project and assessment of its value to the health care community.

OCCT 759. Fieldwork Education Seminar. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: OCCT 715. Promotes professional formation through the integration of foundation concepts and skills necessary for succeeding in fieldwork II and professional practice. Emphasizes policies and procedures, self-awareness and growth, and supervision and communication skills. Extends skills of professionalism and preparation for level II fieldwork experiences.

OCCT 760. Level II Fieldwork in Occupational Therapy. 1-9 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours (54 clinical hours/credit). 1-9 credits, Prerequisites: IPEC 501, OCCT 580, OCCT 589, OCCT 590, OCCT 591, OCCT 592, OCCT 593, OCCT 594, OCCT 613, OCCT 614, OCCT 615, OCCT 616, OCCT 617, OCCT 689, OCCT 693, OCCT 713, OCCT 714, OCCT 715, OCCT 716, OCCT 717, OCCT 720, OCCT 721, OCCT 759, OCCT 752, OCCT 780, OCCT 781. Expands experience in delivering occupational therapy services to variety of individuals across the lifespan in a variety of settings. Promotes interpretation of previously learned skills and knowledge through clinical reasoning and reflective practice. Students extend skills of professionalism and competence as entry-level occupational therapists. Students must complete 480 clinical hours of OCCT 760.

OCCT 761. Level II Fieldwork in Occupational Therapy. 1-9 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours (54 clinical hours/credit). 1-9 credits, Prerequisite: OCCT 760. Clinical experience must be different from that offered in OCCT 760. Expands experience in delivering occupational therapy services to variety of individuals across the lifespan in a variety of settings. Promotes interpretation of previously learned skills and knowledge through clinical reasoning and reflective practice. Students extend skills of professionalism and competence as entry-level occupational therapists. Students must complete 480 clinical hours of OCCT 761.

OCCT 780. OTD Leadership Seminar. 2 Hours.

Seminar course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. A six-week intensive course that focuses on exploration of special topics integral to advancement of occupational therapy practice including, but not limited to, principles of leadership theory, research, emerging practice areas, teaching and learning, and advanced theory.

OCCT 781. Program Development and Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Six-week intensive course. Prerequisite: OCCT 616. Explores basic program development, program evaluation and needs assessment methods necessary for developing upcoming leadership-based doctoral practicum. Focuses on conceptualization, design, models and approaches, and operational procedures used in program development and evaluation. Presents the planning and evaluation cycle, categories of evaluation, program development models and needs assessment techniques used in creating programs. Explores ideas for program development from a variety of perspectives including potential for evaluation of processes and outcomes, social and clinical indicators of need, asset mapping and potential impact of the program. Emphasizes the roles of key stakeholders, regulatory bodies and evaluators, development and use of program theory, and dissemination of evaluation results for improvement of programs and policies.

OCCT 782. Professional Development Portfolio. 2 Hours.

Seminar course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: OCCT 780, OCCT 781. Requires development of independent proposal for professional development based on selection of leadership topic of interest. Guided by a contract written by student and approved by faculty member. Results in an individual professional development portfolio.

OCCT 783. Doctoral Practicum. 10 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours (54 clinical hours/credit). 1-10 credits. Prerequisite: OCCT 761. Provides practical leadership opportunity and advanced skills in one or more areas of interest in clinical practice, administration, research, program or policy development, advocacy, education or theory development. Implements previously proposed, developed and approved project. Completes individualized specific learning objectives and evidence of learning under direct supervision or mentorship. Student must complete 540 practicum hours.

OCCT 784. Practicum Evaluation and Dissemination. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: OCCT 761. Focuses on synthesis and evaluation of doctoral practicum experience, compilation and analysis of practicum outcomes, and interpretation and application of findings or outcomes. Requires development and critique of dissemination products, written and verbal presentation.

OCCT 793. Clinical Specialty Practicum. 2-4 Hours.

Three to nine hours of concentrated clinical experience in the student's chosen area of specialization under the supervision of an experienced clinician (minimum three hours per week for each credit), and one credit hour for guided library research related to topic of practice with preparation of a paper examining the theoretical and empirical bases of practice in specialty area. A contract is prepared by the student and approved by a faculty adviser and clinical supervisor.

OCCT 798. Thesis. 3-6 Hours.

3-6 credits. Completion of a proposal for a master's degree thesis relevant to occupational therapy.

OCCT 799. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

1-6 credits. Completion of a master's degree thesis relevant to occupational therapy.

Patient Counseling (PATC)

PATC 501. Introduction to Health Care Ministry. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 1 practicum hours. 1 credit. Introduces the student to the hospital environment through observation, reading and reflection. Taught jointly with seminary faculty. Required course for dual degree program.

PATC 510. Introduction to Patient Counseling. 3-5 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and optional clocked clinical hours. 3-5 credits. Introduces the student to the development and practice of spiritual care of patients and families. Includes case review and peer interaction. Assignment to the hospital is available to those seeking clinical pastoral education credit. Designed for the nonspecialist.

PATC 511. The Professional Caregiver. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours and 150 clocked clinical hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: PATC 510. Focuses upon development of professional identity and growth within the helping professions. Emphasizes the context of the health-care environment and its impact upon caregivers, patients and families. Includes practical application of theory. Incorporates the use of clinical material. Designed for the nonspecialist.

PATC 515. Basic Patient Counseling. 9 Hours.

7 lecture and 300 clinical clocked hours. 9 credits. Provides an intensive course of study toward the development of pastoral skills in the hospital context. Assigns students to select clinical areas with faculty supervision. Utilizes group process and individual supervision for the review of clinical material.

PATC 551. Selected Issues in Health Care. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. May be repeated to a maximum of 2 credits. Exposes the student to a number of current trends and topics relevant to the contemporary U.S. health care delivery system. Content changes from semester to semester. Utilizes the expertise of hospital personnel.

PATC 592. Independent Study in Patient Counseling. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 credits. Provides opportunity to increase clinical and interpersonal skills in specialty areas through patient care, parallel reading and individual faculty supervision.

PATC 611. Theory and Practice of Patient Counseling I. 5 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 300 clocked clinical hours. 5 credits. Prerequisite: PATC 515 or equivalent. Emphasizes the theological foundations of pastoral care and counseling. Provides an in-depth examination of clinical material in a seminar setting.

PATC 612. Theory and Practice of Patient Counseling II. 5 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 300 clocked clinical hours. 5 credits. Prerequisite: PATC 515 or equivalent. Emphasizes psychological foundations of pastoral care and counseling. Provides an in-depth examination of clinical material in a seminar setting.

PATC 613. Group Process I. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: PATC 515 or equivalent. Explores, in a small group setting, the dynamics common to group behavior. Reflects upon the use of group process learning. Utilizes an experiential method of learning.

PATC 614. Group Process II. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: PATC 515 or equivalent. Focuses upon the various theories of group process. Focuses upon application of theory to a variety of clinical and administrative settings. Utilizes an experiential method of learning.

PATC 615. Theory of Group Leadership. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: PATC 613 or 614. Explores various theories of group leadership. Provides opportunity to test skill development within a peer context.

PATC 617. Supervised Clinical Practice I. 5 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 300 clocked clinical hours. 5 credits. Prerequisites: PATC 611 and 612. Provides the opportunity to apply and practice pastoral care skills with patients and their families under faculty supervision. Emphasizes professional competence toward an integration of theological, psychological and sociological aspects of spiritual care in varied clinical contexts.

PATC 618. Supervised Clinical Practice II. 5 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 300 clocked clinical hours. 5 credits. May be repeated for a total of 10 credits. Prerequisites: PATC 611 and PATC 612. Provides the opportunity to apply and practice clinical skills in a pastoral care specialty under faculty supervision. Utilizes university and hospital personnel in specialty areas.

PATC 619. Spiritual and Social Integration Seminar. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. This course is a summary course required for persons in the dual-degree program. Provides in-depth reflection on the theological and social implications of ministry within the health-care environment. Course is taught jointly with seminary faculty.

PATC 620. Religious and Social Factors in Patient Counseling. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Provides an understanding of the theological and social factors related to hospitalization. Focuses on the use of ritual and tradition in caring for persons in crisis.

PATC 621. Care of the Dying. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Explores the spiritual and psychological dynamics associated with loss for patients and families. Offers special attention to the emotional and spiritual impact on caregivers that work with dying patients. Includes the use of clinical material within a group experience.

PATC 627. Living Well. 2-3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 or 3 lecture hours. 2 or 3 credits. Focuses on the development, facilitation and leadership of support groups for bereaved families. Provides students the opportunity to increase interpersonal and clinical skills in supporting families who have experienced a significant death. Special attention is offered to the needs of children. Requires participation in "Living Well," a contracted component of VCU Health System's bereavement program that utilizes art and group discussion.

PATC 629. Spirituality and Aging. 2-3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 or 3 lecture hours. 2 or 3 credits. Explores the spiritual, psychological and social dynamics associated with aging. Provides special attention to the spiritual and emotional impact on caregivers who work with aging patients. Crosslisted as: GRTY 629.

PATC 635. Clinical Ethics. 2-3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2-3 credits. Applies the principles of biomedical and health-care ethics to a more informed understanding of ethical decision making in the clinical environment. Concerned with the identification, analysis and resolution of ethical problems that arise in planning for the care of patients. Emphasizes the ethical responsibilities of clinical and pastoral caregivers.

PATC 636. Professional Identity and Ethics. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Focuses on guidelines for professional ethics in the development and maintenance of professional and personal integrity, leadership ability and the enhancement of a congruency between spiritual, psychological and physical maturity.

PATC 639. Pastoral Care Management. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Surveys the theory and practice of pastoral-care management within the present health-care environment including personnel management, process improvement, benchmarking and qualitative research design. Taught cooperatively with hospital personnel.

PATC 640. Research Basics for Hospital Chaplains. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Provides an overview of research basics within the context of hospital chaplaincy. Emphasizes the methodological issues in health services research that involve hospital chaplains.

PATC 641. Evidence-based Inquiry for Hospital Chaplains. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Prerequisite: PATC 640. Provides an overview of data collection, data quality and data usage within the context of hospital chaplaincy. Emphasizes an understanding of the use of data by health services administrators in operational and strategic decisions and for performance improvement.

PATC 642. Developing and Presenting Chaplaincy Research. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Prerequisite: PATC 640. Provides an overview of how to analyze and present evidence-based project findings and recommendations within a hospital or academic environment. Emphasizes understanding different objectives and dissemination routes for evidence-based chaplaincy projects as well as demonstrating an understanding of dissemination of evidence-based project results to relevant audiences.

PATC 653. Patient Counseling Evaluation I. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 practicum hours. 4 credits. Focuses upon the theory and practice of case based education and clinical evaluation relevant for pastoral supervision. Observation of and reflection upon the work of ACPE supervisors are required.

PATC 654. Patient Counseling Evaluation II. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 practicum hours. 4 credits. Continues the theoretical and practical focus of PATC 653. Students move from observation to participation in clinical evaluation of pastoral care interns.

PATC 661. History of Pastoral Supervision. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Focuses on the history and development of clinical pastoral education as a movement. Exposes the student to theoretical basis of clinical pastoral education as established in professional and organizational standards.

PATC 663. Theory of Pastoral Supervision I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Focuses on the literature in pastoral supervision. Emphasizes the applicability of educational and personality theory relevant for clinical pastoral education.

PATC 664. Theory of Pastoral Supervision II. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Focuses on the literature related to cultural and gender factors relevant for pastoral supervision.

PATC 665. Selected Topics in Pastoral Supervision. 2 Hours.

2 lecture hours. 2 credits. May be repeated for a total of 4 credits. Presents a variety of topics on supervisory theory and practice for persons seeking certification by the ACPE. Utilizes ACPE supervisors as well as university and local seminary faculty.

PATC 692. Independent Study in Pastoral Supervision. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; 1-4 credits. May be repeated for a total of 4 credits. Provides individual focus and direction of student readings in theories of pastoral supervision. Readings are selected from bibliography of the ACPE Certification Commission.

PATC 694. Advanced Clinical Pastoral Supervision. 7 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 15 practicum hours. 7 credits. Prerequisite: PATC 654. Advanced attention to integration of education and personality theories with theology. Includes the actual practice of supervision under faculty guidance. Restricted to individuals admitted to candidacy status in ACPE, Inc. May be repeated.

PATC 696. Intensive Supervisory Practicum. 9 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 18 practicum hours. 9 credits. Prerequisite: PATC 694. Provides opportunity for independent supervision of pastoral care interns with mentoring and evaluation by faculty. Utilizes ACPE supervisory personnel. Restricted to individuals admitted to candidacy status in ACPE. May be repeated.

PATC 697. Clinical Research. 1-5 Hours.

Semester course; 1-5 credits. May be repeated for a total of 5 credits. Provides the opportunity to test the practical application of research and process improvement methods within the clinical context. Encourages the development of collaborative and interdisciplinary project development.

Physical Therapy (PHTY)

PHTY 501. Gross Anatomy (Physical Therapy). 7 Hours.

Semester course; 4 lecture and 6 laboratory hours. 7 credits. Examines the structural and functional anatomy of the human musculoskeletal system through lecture and cadaver dissection. Develops understanding of fundamental facts and principles that apply to professional practice through lecture, dissection, radiographic examination and clinical correlation.

PHTY 502. Kinesiology. 4 Hours.

3 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Introduces the student to the kinematics and kinetics of human movement. Emphasis is placed on osteokinematics, arthrokinematics and the structures that limit and/or guide movement.

PHTY 503. Applied Exercise Physiology for Wellness and Health Promotion. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Restricted to students in the professional Doctor of Physical Therapy program. Integrates principles and practices of applied physiology, health promotion, wellness and adult fitness. Emphasizes the underlying physiology with assessing physical fitness and developing therapeutic exercise prescriptions which meet recommended guidelines for achieving and maintaining optimal physical fitness and health.

PHTY 505. Applied Microscopic Anatomy for Physical Therapy. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 4 lecture hours. 4 credits. Examines the basic components of cells in terms of their structure and function. Cells and tissues of greatest importance to physical therapists are studied in detail, and their response to injury is explored. Reviews methods of studying cells.

PHTY 506. Functional Neuroanatomy. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Examines the basic structure and function of the nervous system with special emphasis on topics of greatest concern to physical therapists. Uses neurobiological approach to integrate the basic health sciences of neuroanatomy, neurophysiology and clinical neuroscience.

PHTY 508. Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy I. 6 Hours.

Semester course; 4 lecture and 4 laboratory hours. 6 credits. Teaches some of the basic evaluation methods and measurement procedures used by physical therapists in history taking and physical examination. Includes lecture, demonstration and practice in measurement of the length and girth of body parts, manual and mechanical muscle testing, joint range of motion, accessory motion testing, and palpation.

PHTY 510. Rehabilitation I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Introduces basic clinical skills and procedures, including measurement of vital signs, patient lifting and moving techniques, progressive mobilization, medical asepsis and principles of bandaging. Introduces medical documentation, record keeping and professional communication. Introduces communication methods and skills appropriate for interaction with patients, families and colleagues.

PHTY 512. Health Care Systems. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Restricted to students in the professional Doctor of Physical Therapy program. Introduces students to issues in health care related to organization, finance, access and regulation of services for individuals, groups and communities. Provides a general overview of inter-relationships among health care consumers, providers, organizations, regulators and third-party payers. Discusses implications for public policy and legislative action. Critically reviews supplemental readings to illustrate key concepts and their relevance to the practice of physical therapy.

PHTY 520. Clinical Education I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour and 80 clinic hours. 3 credits. Introduces the profession of physical therapy. Emphasizes professionalism, ethics, professional behaviors, physical therapy extenders role and individual differences that may impact patient care. Provides an introduction to the Guide to Physical Therapy Practice and educational concepts that are related to personal growth and patient management. Includes a part-time experience in local acute care hospitals and/or home health and long-term care facilities designed to introduce the student to physical therapy practice. Allows students to develop interpersonal skills with patients, peers and other health care professionals while applying and practicing skills learned in the first professional year of education in a clinical setting.

PHTY 531. Evidence-based Practice Concepts. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Introduces concepts and principles of the research process including question, theory and hypothesis development, research design and methodology, and statistical reasoning and analysis. Discusses the basis of critical review of professional literature and determination of the relevance and applicability of research findings to specific patients with the goal of promoting evidence-based practice.

PHTY 537. Rehabilitation II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Restricted to students in the professional Doctor of Physical Therapy program. Presents evaluation and treatment methodology for the acute care patient. Focuses on the rehabilitation phase of patient care for different patient diagnoses. Provides interprofessional opportunities with other health care professional students.

PHTY 540. Psychosocial Aspects of Physical Therapy. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Introduces the student to sociocultural and psychosocial characteristics of patient populations that impact the rehabilitation process. Addresses the patient and family in the health care system, including sexuality, impact of disability, grief processes, death and dying, and selected counseling techniques.

PHTY 601. Advanced Measurement Concepts. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Investigates the principles of measurement theory as applied to clinical practice. Reviews basic principles guiding electronic instrumentation and electromyography. Examines the theoretical bases for the examination and treatment approaches used in orthopedic physical therapy or neurologic physical therapy.

PHTY 603. Evidence-based Practice I. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 4 lecture hours. 4 credits. Introduces concepts and principles of the research process including question, theory and hypothesis development, research design and methodology, and statistical reasoning and analysis. Introduces critical review of professional literature and determination of the relevance and applicability of research findings to specific patients with the goal of promoting evidence-based physical therapy practice. Teaches how to access and implement electronic search engines to locate and retrieve professional literature. Twelve lecture hours will be provided on site at the beginning of the semester; the remainder of the course will be distance-based.

PHTY 604. Evidence-based Practice II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PHTY 603. Continuation of PHTY 603. Provides an advanced review of the concepts and principles of the research process and evidence-based practice. Focuses on skills needed to develop relevant clinical questions for specific patient scenarios, perform a critical appraisal of professional literature and determine the applicability of the research findings for patient management. Includes preparation of a publication-ready paper on a topic relevant to the student's practice interests. Course is entirely distance-based.

PHTY 605. Foundations for Pathokinesiology. 3,4 Hours.

Semester course; 3-4 lecture hours. 3-4 credits. A study of the principles that form a foundation for understanding pathokinesiology and therapeutic kinesiology. Integration of principles of motor development, control and learning with emphasis on abnormal motor behavior and its remediation.

PHTY 606. Therapeutic Kinesiology. 2-4 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture and 3 clinical hours. 2-4 credits. A study of motor behavior in both normal and pathological conditions. Reading and discussion of the basic literature of current neurologic approaches to therapeutic exercises and an integration of these concepts into a comprehensive model of human movement.

PHTY 608. Advanced Musculoskeletal Sciences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines the structure and function of tissues of the musculoskeletal system. Investigates mechanisms of healing of these tissues and explores the affects of various modalities, altered use and disease on the structure and function of musculoskeletal tissues. Crosslisted as: REMS 608.

PHTY 609. Clinical Biomechanics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Provides an opportunity to develop knowledge in sufficient depth to understand how selected biomechanical factors influence normal and pathologic human form and movement. Stresses validity and reliability of methods of evaluating musculoskeletal form and function.

PHTY 610. Physical Therapy Evaluation in the Direct Access Setting. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Covers critical physical therapy evaluation skills necessary for autonomous practice in the adult outpatient orthopaedic setting; recognition of the clinical manifestations of medical problems that may mimic mechanical neuromusculoskeletal seen by physical therapists and screening for medical referral. Through topic discussions, case presentations and self-paced tutorials, develops skills to screen for conditions that merit physician referral when practicing in the direct access setting. Eight lecture hours will be provided on site; the remainder of the course will be distance-based.

PHTY 611. Research Process. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Readings, discussions and reports on the current status of professional literature and validation of clinical practice, clinical administration and professional education. A model for professional development, the role of research in the validation process and the basis of research design are presented non-mathematically. Required of all advanced master of science degree students unless excused by the faculty.

PHTY 612. Advanced Biomechanics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: REMS/HEMS 611 or permission of instructor. Designed for students in the interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Rehabilitation and Movement Science. Covers advanced biomechanics techniques for the evaluation and quantification of human performance. Encourages scientific thought with practical applications. Crosslisted as: REMS 612.

PHTY 613. Evidence for Orthopaedic Practice. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: PHTY 603. Evidence-based medicine course for orthopedic physical therapy. Through presentations, topic discussions and case presentations students will acquired evidence on selected topics of the evaluation and treatment of musculoskeletal dysfunctions in physical therapy practice. Promotes development of skills needed for the acquisition, reading and interpretation of published studies in the area of orthopaedic physical therapy. The entire course is distance-based.

PHTY 614. Evidence for Neurologic Practice. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: PHTY 603. Evidence-based medicine course for neurologic physical therapy. Through Web-based presentations, topic discussions and case presentations, students will acquire evidence for selected topics related to the evaluation and treatment of neurologic dysfunctions in physical therapy practice. Promotes the development of skills in the acquisition, reading and interpretation of published studies in the area of neurologic physical therapy. The entire course is distance-based.

PHTY 615. Pharmacology (Physical Therapy). 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Restricted to students in the Professional Doctor of Physical Therapy program. Series of lectures on the integrated approach to the study of human disease and pharmacotherapeutics. Covers the pharmacological management of common disease states affecting physical function. Emphasizes the utilization of subjective and objective patient data for the assessment, monitoring and optimization of pharmacotherapy.

PHTY 616. Evidence of Tissue Healing and Therapeutic Modalities. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: PHTY 603. Distance-based course that focuses on current trends and topics of tissue healing including the effects of physical therapy interventions on healing tissues using an evidence-based approach. Reviews histology and cytology concepts relevant to clinical practice or necessary for interpreting scientific literature on the topic.

PHTY 617. t-DPT Gross Anatomy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Focuses on musculoskeletal anatomy with high clinical relevance for physical therapists. Incorporates introductory material on diagnostic imaging of the spine and extremities. Self-directed distance learning modules will be augmented with a series of on-campus cadaver dissection laboratories over a four-day visit to campus.

PHTY 621. Therapeutic Agents. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 4 credits. Examines the theoretical bases for and therapeutic application of thermal, mechanical and electrical agents. Emphasizes the physical and physiological effects, indications and contraindications for electrical current, diathermy, superficial heat and cold, massage, ultraviolet, traction, ultrasound, laser and compression therapy. Analyzes relative current scientific literature and uses laboratories for practice and clinical problem-solving.

PHTY 623. Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Applies principles of pathophysiology of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems; includes physical therapy assessment and treatment of patients with cardiac and respiratory disorders.

PHTY 624. Clinical Problem-solving I. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Restricted to students in the Professional Doctor of Physical Therapy program. Provides an advanced review of the concepts and principles of the research process and evidence-based practice. Focuses on skills needed to perform a critical appraisal of professional literature and to determine the relevance and applicability of research findings to a specific patient or series of patients based on information collected during the first summer clinical experience. Provides opportunity to develop oral patient case presentation skills.

PHTY 626. Lifespan I. 6 Hours.

Semester course; 9 lecture and laboratory hours. 6 credits. Restricted to students in the professional Doctor of Physical Therapy program. Covers models of typical motor, psychosocial, neurological and musculoskeletal development from birth through adolescence; models of neurologic dysfunction in developmental disabilities; principles of examination and evaluation in pediatrics; commonly seen diagnoses; and treatment planning for a pediatric population.

PHTY 627. Lifespan II. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Discusses age related changes in physical structure, motor control and psychosocial/cognitive issues in humans from middle adulthood to the end of life. Emphasizes the geriatric population and the physical therapy management of problems with the integumentary system. Highlights the role of the physical therapist in making program modifications based on age related changes.

PHTY 629. Special Topics in Physical Therapy. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Provides an opportunity to pursue and present a topic of interest that is related to physical therapy evaluation and treatment.

PHTY 640. Neurologic Physical Therapy. 6 Hours.

Semester course; 4 lecture and 4 laboratory hours. 6 credits. Applies principles of motor development, control and learning to the evaluation and remediation of motor disorders. Critically surveys current theory and practice of neuromotor therapeutics.

PHTY 644. Orthotics and Prosthetics. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prepares the student to participate as a member of the professional prosthetic or orthotic clinic team, integrates material from other courses, and teaches basic skills in orthotic and prosthetic assessment, prescription, and training and performing initial and final prosthetic and orthotic checkouts.

PHTY 646. Clinical Medicine. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Covers topics in clinical medicine and the sciences relevant to the practice of physical therapy. Medical practitioners from the VCU Medical Center and surrounding areas participate.

PHTY 648. Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy II. 5 Hours.

Semester course; 4 lecture and 2 laboratory hours and 24 clinical hours. 5 credits. Examines principles and techniques used by physical therapists for the treatment of patients with orthopaedic disorders. Uses scientific evidence and theoretical rationale in a problem-solving approach to develop treatment plans for patients with orthopaedic musculoskeletal disorders. Provides opportunities for students to gain hands-on experiences with patients in a clinical setting.

PHTY 650. Clinical Education II. 8 Hours.

Semester course; 320 clock hours. 8 credits. Restricted to students in the Professional Doctor of Physical Therapy program. Eight-week, full-time clinical experience designed to develop competency in physical therapy evaluation and treatment. Teaches the use of sound scientific rationale and problem solving skills in aspects of patient care. Promotes the development of an independent professional through synthesis and utilization of advanced academic theory in evaluation and treatment. Encourages the exploration of interest areas in a variety of practice settings.

PHTY 651. Professional Issues in Physical Therapy. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Restricted to students in the Professional Doctor of Physical Therapy program. Discusses professional issues facing the modern physical therapy practitioner, including ethical decision making, state and national current physical therapy issues, and legislative efforts. Provides opportunity for advancing skills in educational techniques, assertiveness skills, conflict resolution, as well as preparation for employment via resume and portfolio writing and interview skills.

PHTY 654. Clinical Problem-solving II. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Restricted to students in the Professional Doctor of Physical Therapy program. Provides the opportunity to review, integrate and develop strategies using previously presented material and research to present an oral case study of a patient or patients from the clinical experience in the previous summer.

PHTY 660. Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy III. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 2 credits. Prerequisites: PHTY 508 and PHTY 648. Synthesizes information from the prerequisite classes through case study examples, hands-on practice and lecture on the incorporation of musculoskeletal evaluation and treatment. Emphasizes clinical reasoning in determining individualized physical therapy interventions based off of a comprehensive physical therapy evaluation. Focuses on case study examples of complicated patient presentations to help better prepare students to treat patients with multiple co-morbidities and impairments. Highlights commonly seen movement pattern dysfunctions throughout the course to help students to both identify and treat regional interdependent impairments related to the patient’s primary complaint.

PHTY 661. Administration and Management in Physical Therapy. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Restricted to students in the Professional Doctor of Physical Therapy program. Provides students with a basic understanding of operational issues related to physical therapy practice in a variety of settings. Topics include leadership, operational and business success measures, reimbursement, quality assurance, performance improvement, utilization review, risk management, documentation and marketing. Skill sets include, at an introductory level, supervision, delegation, hiring practices, budget development and analysis, peer review, outcomes measurement, and ethical decision making.

PHTY 670. Clinical Integration of Physical Therapy Concepts. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 credits. Restricted to students in the Professional Doctor of Physical Therapy program. Uses case studies in a problem-based learning approach, which will allow students to integrate knowledge about patient evaluation and assessment with treatment design, implementation, and progression. Utilizes current literature to support treatment interventions. Includes topic areas: pediatrics, orthopaedics, neurology, oncology, cardiac rehabilitation, integumentary systems and acute care/ICU.

PHTY 674. Clinical Problem-solving III. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture 1 credit. Restricted to students in the Professional Doctor of Physical Therapy program. Integrates material from D.P.T. courses with clinical research. Provides experience in writing individual case reports dealing in depth with the history, current status and problems in a given area of clinical specialization.

PHTY 676. Comprehensive Study of Physical Therapy Practice. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Reviews topics in practice patterns of neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, integumentary and professionalism relative to physical therapy practice. Prepares students for the national physical therapy examination.

PHTY 680. Clinical Education III. 12 Hours.

Semester course; 480 clinical hours. 12 credits. Twelve-week full-time clinical experience designed to allow the student to develop entry-level competence in physical therapy evaluation and treatment techniques. Includes the use of sound scientific rationale and problem-solving skills in all aspects of patient care. Promotes the development of an independent professional through synthesis and utilization of advanced academic theory in evaluation and treatment. Graded P/F.

PHTY 690. Physical Therapy Graduate Seminar. 16 Hours.

Semester course; 1 credit. Provides opportunity to develop knowledge and skills in evaluating published scientific literature related to physical therapy, developing researchable questions and orally presenting the material in a professionally appropriate manner.

PHTY 691. Special Topics in Physical Therapy. 1-4 Hours.

1-4 credits. Guided independent study of specific topics not discussed in courses or discussed in less detail in courses. Student's desired topic of study must be identified and approved prior to enrollment.

PHTY 692. Clinical Specialty Seminar. 0.5-3 Hours.

Semester course; 0.5-3 credits. Individual reports dealing in depth with the history, current status and problems in a given area of clinical specialization.

PHTY 693. Clinical Specialty Practicum. 1-9 Hours.

60 clock hours per credit. 1-9 credits. Concentrated clinical experience under the guidance of an approved preceptor.

PHTY 695. Clinical Education IV. 12 Hours.

Semester course; 480 clinical hours. 12 credits. Twelve-week full-time clinical experience designed to allow the student to develop entry-level competence in physical therapy evaluation and treatment techniques. Includes the use of sound scientific rationale and problem-solving skills in all aspects of patient care. Promotes the development of an independent professional through synthesis and utilization of advanced academic theory in evaluation and treatment. Graded P/F.

PHTY 798. Research in Physical Therapy. 1-15 Hours.

1-15 credits. Research in preparation for the advanced master of science degree thesis or doctoral dissertation.

Rehabilitation and Movement Science (REMS)

REMS 540. Cardiovascular Pathophysiology and Pharmacology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: HPEX 375 and HPEX 440 or equivalents. Presents theoretical principles of electrocardiography and the effects of pharmacological intervention in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Specific emphasis placed on myocardial ischemia, myocardial infarction and their treatment through exercise rehabilitation protocols. The impact of pharmacological agents on the ECG and on exercise are explored. Crosslisted as: HEMS 540.

REMS 608. Advanced Musculoskeletal Sciences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines the structure and function of tissues of the musculoskeletal system. Investigates mechanisms of healing of these tissues and explores the affects of various modalities, altered use and disease on the structure and function of musculoskeletal tissues. Crosslisted as: PHTY 608.

REMS 611. Biomechanics of Human Motion. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BIOL 205 or equivalent. Recommended: PHYS 201, or HPEX 374 or 373, or equivalents. Application of the knowledge and methods of mechanics in the study of the structure and function of the human body as applied to sport, physical activity and rehabilitation. Topics include kinematics, kinetics and methods of biomechanical analysis. Crosslisted as: HEMS 611.

REMS 612. Advanced Biomechanics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: REMS/HEMS 611 or permission of instructor. Designed for students in the interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Rehabilitation and Movement Science. Covers advanced biomechanics techniques for the evaluation and quantification of human performance. Encourages scientific thought with practical applications. Crosslisted as: PHTY 612.

REMS 660. Neuromuscular Performance. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: HEMS/REMS 601 and HEMS 611. Examines the interrelationships between the musculoskeletal and neuromuscular systems. Includes examination of normal and abnormal biomechanics of the musculoskeletal system, biomechanical factors related to human performance, as well as acute and chronic adaptations of the neuromuscular system. Emphasizes how these principles can be applied to physical training in healthy and diseased populations and treatment and rehabilitation in the sports medicine setting. Crosslisted as: HEMS 660.

REMS 665. Instrumentation in Motion Analysis. 3 Hours.

2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Designed for students in the interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Rehabilitation and Movement Science Program. Examines theories, principles, and applications of systems used to qualify and characterize movement.

REMS 690. Research Seminar in Rehabilitation and Movement Science. 0.5 Hours.

Seminar course; 0.5 credit. Seminar course designed for students in the interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Rehabilitation and Movement Science Program. Presentation and discussion of research reports and topics of interest. Advances skills in critical analysis and discussion leadership. Topics and research presentations vary from semester to semester and are coordinated by the instructor of record. May be repeated. Graded as pass/fail.

REMS 692. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for 6 credits. Determination of the amount of credit and permission of the instructor and division head must be procured prior to registration. Cannot be used in place of existing courses. An individual study of a specialized issue or problem in health or movement sciences. Crosslisted as: HEMS 692.

REMS 701. Advanced Exercise Physiology I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PHIS 501 or other graduate-level mammalian physiology course or permission of instructor. Investigates the effect of acute and chronic exercise stimuli on human performance and select disease states. Topics to be addresses include exercise bioenergetics, metabolic responses to exercise, contributions to substrate selection and utilization during exercise, muscular performance and adaptations to exercise training, cardiovascular adaptation to exercise, aerobic and anaerobic training programs, and effects of training on fitness and performance.

REMS 702. Advanced Exercise Physiology II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHIS 501 or other graduate-level mammalian physiology course or permission of instructor, and REMS 701. Investigates the effect of physiological stressors on human performance and health through lecture and article discussion. Topics to be addressed include exercise in the heat and cold, effects of altitude on physical performance, acute and chronic endocrine responses to exercise, role of adipokines in chronic disease conditions, the use of ergogenic aids in sport.

REMS 703. Cardiovascular Exercise Physiology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment requires permission of instructor. Investigates the structural, functional and cellular principles of human cardiovascular physiology as applied to health and human performance. Emphasis will be placed on the metabolic, contractile and hemodynamic adaptations to acute and chronic exercise training.

REMS 704. Psychobiology of Physical Activity. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment requires permission of instructor. "Psychobiology" is defined as the integrative study of behavior from the social, cognitive and biological levels of analysis. This course will include an examination of the research that encompasses psychophysiology, psychoneuroendocrinology, psychoneuroimmunology, neuroscience, physiological psychology and behavioral genetics applied to exercise.

REMS 705. Metabolic Aspects of Physical Activity. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment requires permission of instructor. This course is designed to explore the thermic effects of physical activity in apparently healthy individuals, as well as those with increased risk for cardiovascular, metabolic or other inflammatory diseases. Additionally, the relationship between physical activity and food intake, resting metabolic rate and dietary-induced thermogenesis will be reviewed. The examination of gastrointestinal function during dietary manipulation will also be assessed to address performance enhancement in several types of physical activities. This course will emphasize the metabolic control of ATP synthesis, which includes carbohydrate, lipid and protein metabolism and their interaction with one another in response to biological needs during rest and physical activity.

REMS 710. Research Techniques in Rehabilitation and Movement Science. 1-3 Hours.

50 hours of laboratory times per credit hour. 1-3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required. Examines and explores laboratory techniques used in rehabilitation and movement science research. Provides opportunity to begin transitioning clinical problems to research questions. Opportunities in laboratories of the rehabilitation and movement science program or other laboratories approved by the adviser or program directors. Focuses on individual student learning needs. Graded as pass/fail.

REMS 793. Teaching Practicum in Higher Education. 1 Hour.

50 hours of contact/preparation time for each credit. 1 credit. Practicum designed for students in the interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Rehabilitation and Movement Science degree program. Develops skills necessary for classroom teaching including preparing and presenting selected topic (s), writing test questions, and grading examinations. May be repeated for additional teaching experience. Graded as pass/fail.

REMS 794. Research Presentation Seminar. 1 Hour.

1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Seminar course designed for students in the interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Rehabilitation and Movement Science Program. Develops presentation skills. Requires preparation and presentation of research at a public research forum scheduled by the instructor of record. Students are expected to submit their research for presentation at a selected regional, national or international conference in a related field. Graded as pass/fail.

REMS 798. Research in Rehabilitation and Movement Science. 1-12 Hours.

Semester course; 1-12 credits. Research leading to the Ph.D. degree and elective research projects for students in the Rehabilitation and Movement Science doctoral program. May be repeated. Graded as "S," "U" or "F.

Rehabilitation Counseling (RHAB)

RHAB 502. American Sign Language I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Introduces the rules and grammatical structure of ASL with a focus on grammar and vocabulary to increase the learner's expressive and receptive understanding of the language. Provides an introduction to Deaf culture and crosscultural interactions, and to tactile and close-vision communication techniques used by individuals who are deaf-blind.

RHAB 503. American Sign Language II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Provides continued study of the grammatical structure of ASL; introduction of additional vocabulary with emphasis on expressive and receptive competence; continued study of the tactile and close-vision communication techniques used by individuals who are deaf-blind; and continued study of the Deaf culture.

RHAB 521. Addiction Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides a biopsychosocial overview of addiction and addictive disorders. Reviews contemporary theories of addiction, pharmacological classification of psychoactive substances and contemporary approaches toward assessment, diagnosis, treatment and community support. Reviews cultural, legal and historical factors regarding substance use and addictive processes.

RHAB 522. Clinical Evaluation, Assessment and Treatment Planning in Substance Abuse Rehabilitation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: RHAB 521. Stresses development of professional competencies. Focuses on systematic approach to screening and on-going assessment; diagnostic criteria for dependence and abuse; testing and interviewing; co-morbidity; collaborative approaches to individualized clinical treatment planning; awareness of treatment resources.

RHAB 523. Contemporary Issues in Substance Abuse Treatment and Recovery. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: RHAB 521. Examines current issues and research in the field. Includes topics such as denial, social isolation, intervention; lifelong nature of recovery, support needs, relapse prevention; legal, political and ethical issues; special populations (e.g., physical disability); poly-drug abuse; perinatal addiction; program administration; professional readiness.

RHAB 525. Introduction to Rehabilitation Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides an overview of history, philosophy, legislation, organizational structure and trends in the rehabilitation profession. Focuses on attitudinal, social and environmental barriers to the inclusion of people with disabilities; professional identity, roles and functions; CRC Code of Ethics; CRC Standards of Practice; and career options.

RHAB 526. Introduction to Mental Health Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides an overview of history, philosophy, legislation, organizational structure and trends in mental health counseling. Focuses on advocacy; professional identity, roles and functions; ethics; counseling certification and licensure; and career options.

RHAB 533. Directed Readings in Rehabilitation. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Provides intensive study in one or more topical areas of rehabilitation through directed readings under the supervision of a faculty member.

RHAB 611. Theories of Professional Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides a deep understanding of the major theoretical approaches, models and strategies to effective counseling, consultation, prevention, advocacy and wellness programs with an emphasis on common factors and evidence-based effectiveness. The intent is to assist students in developing an ethical and culturally relevant yet personal model of counseling.

RHAB 612. Group Counseling Theories and Techniques. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Reviews theoretical foundations of group work, group dynamics and processes, group therapeutic factors, and characteristics and functions of effective group leaders. Reviews ethical and culturally relevant strategies for designing, implementing and facilitating a variety of group approaches. Provides experience in group participation and development of group leadership skills.

RHAB 613. Advanced Rehabilitation Counseling Seminar. 3-9 Hours.

3-9 lecture hours. 3-9 credits. Prerequisites: RHAB 611 and RHAB 612 or permission of instructor. This course is designed to provide an opportunity for students to undertake a more in-depth study of selected approaches to individual and/or group counseling of rehabilitation clients. Principles and techniques relevant to vocational, educational, and personal adjustment problems related to severe and multiple disabilities will be systematically explored and studied. Audio visual tape experience will be offered.

RHAB 614. Counseling, Death and Loss. 3 Hours.

3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: RHAB 611 or permission of instructor. Explores the psychosocial processes of adaptation to severe losses such as those occasioned by the onset of disability, death and developmental life changes. Emphasizes the knowledge and skills required by rehabilitation counselors in dealing with losses experienced by their clients.

RHAB 615. Human Growth and Development. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines the major themes of research on human development over the lifespan -- from conception through adulthood. Focuses on the physical, emotional, social and cognitive aspects across the lifespan. Emphasizes how developmental processes relate to persons with disabilities and impact the work of rehabilitation and other helping professions.

RHAB 616. Couples and Family Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides an overview of approaches to couples and family counseling. Instruction in the theoretical foundation and interventions in couples and family therapy will be examined.

RHAB 623. Career Counseling and Job Placement. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides an overview of major theories of career development with emphasis on theories relevant to rehabilitation practice. Explores occupational information and job matching systems, career counseling techniques, and major job placement approaches and techniques, with emphasis on demand-side job placement.

RHAB 624. Assessment and Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines principles of measurement, assessment and diagnosis in rehabilitation and mental health counseling; test selection, administration and interpretation; accommodating individuals with disabilities in the testing process. Includes an overview of the major domains in assessment.

RHAB 625. Research and Program Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines basic principles rehabilitation research and program evaluation, including an emphasis on the critical review of published research for use in rehabilitation and mental health counseling practice. Focuses on students' understanding of the application of research and program evaluation tools to enhance the quality of rehabilitation services delivered.

RHAB 633. Case Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Explores history, theory, practice and ethics of case management as well as the full range of community resources as these contribute to successful outcomes. Reviews and critically analyzes benefit systems, treatment and life care planning, coordination and delivery of services, disability management, documentation, and case studies.

RHAB 640. Medical and Psychosocial Aspects of Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides an overview of the major disabilities encountered by rehabilitation and mental health counselors. Focuses on functional limitations and the process of psychological adjustment.

RHAB 642. Diagnosis and Treatment of Mental Health Disorders. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines the major mental disorders and their etiology, prevalence, diagnosis and impact on individuals and society. Reviews the prevailing multiaxial classification systems and diagnostic processes, procedures and nomenclatures currently used in clinical practice. Provides an overview of rehabilitation and mental health treatment planning and interventions using a biopsychosocial framework.

RHAB 644. Alcohol and Human Behavior. 3 Hours.

3 credits. Prerequisites: RHAB 521, RHAB 522, RHAB 523 and RHAB 695, or permission of instructor. Understanding the significance of behavior as a tool in diagnosing, treating and/or referring the addict; appreciation of particular cues to observe the predominant behavior associated with living problems and reflected by the alcohol or drug abuser.

RHAB 654. Multicultural Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides an overview of multicultural counseling theories and techniques. Provides an understanding of how human development, family, gender, race and ethnicity impact upon the process of adjustment to disability.

RHAB 681. Institutes and Workshops in Rehabilitation. 1-3 Hours.

Orientation institutes and other short-term training programs are offered for rehabilitation counselors newly recruited to the rehabilitation field and for the further professional development of those already employed. Content will vary according to the aims of the institutes or workshops. Length of time and number of credits are announced prior to each institute or workshop.

RHAB 682. Institutes and Workshops in Rehabilitation. 1-3 Hours.

Orientation institutes and other short-term training programs are offered for rehabilitation counselors newly recruited to the rehabilitation field and for the further professional development of those already employed. Content will vary according to the aims of the institutes or workshops. Length of time and number of credits are announced prior to each institute or workshop.

RHAB 683. Institutes and Workshops in Rehabilitation. 1-3 Hours.

Orientation institutes and other short-term training programs are offered for rehabilitation counselors newly recruited to the rehabilitation field and for the further professional development of those already employed. Content will vary according to the aims of the institutes or workshops. Length of time and number of credits are announced prior to each institute or workshop.

RHAB 684. Institutes and Workshops in Rehabilitation. 1-3 Hours.

Orientation institutes and other short-term training programs are offered for rehabilitation counselors newly recruited to the rehabilitation field and for the further professional development of those already employed. Content will vary according to the aims of the institutes or workshops. Length of time and number of credits are announced prior to each institute or workshop.

RHAB 685. Institutes and Workshops in Rehabilitation. 1-3 Hours.

Orientation institutes and other short-term training programs are offered for rehabilitation counselors newly recruited to the rehabilitation field and for the further professional development of those already employed. Content will vary according to the aims of the institutes or workshops. Length of time and number of credits are announced prior to each institute or workshop.

RHAB 686. Institutes and Workshops in Rehabilitation. 1-3 Hours.

Orientation institutes and other short-term training programs are offered for rehabilitation counselors newly recruited to the rehabilitation field and for the further professional development of those already employed. Content will vary according to the aims of the institutes or workshops. Length of time and number of credits are announced prior to each institute or workshop.

RHAB 687. Institutes and Workshops in Rehabilitation. 1-3 Hours.

Orientation institutes and other short-term training programs are offered for rehabilitation counselors newly recruited to the rehabilitation field and for the further professional development of those already employed. Content will vary according to the aims of the institutes or workshops. Length of time and number of credits are announced prior to each institute or workshop.

RHAB 688. Institutes and Workshops in Rehabilitation. 1-3 Hours.

Orientation institutes and other short-term training programs are offered for rehabilitation counselors newly recruited to the rehabilitation field and for the further professional development of those already employed. Content will vary according to the aims of the institutes or workshops. Length of time and number of credits are announced prior to each institute or workshop.

RHAB 689. Institutes and Workshops in Rehabilitation. 1-3 Hours.

Orientation institutes and other short-term training programs are offered for rehabilitation counselors newly recruited to the rehabilitation field and for the further professional development of those already employed. Content will vary according to the aims of the institutes or workshops. Length of time and number of credits are announced prior to each institute or workshop.

RHAB 691. Counseling Techniques. 3 Hours.

Semester course. 3 credits. Provides experience and practice in the basic counseling skills related to the helping process. Examines the variety of clinical settings available for professional preparation. Provides the necessary level of skill development for students to participate in internship.

RHAB 692. Advanced Professional Issues in Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: RHAB 691. Provides an advanced overview of professional identity, roles and functions; counseling practice issues; supervision; and specialized counseling techniques in rehabilitation and mental health counseling. Includes 100 hours of supervised rehabilitation and mental health counseling practicum.

RHAB 693. Introduction to Field Experiences for Rehabilitation Counselors. 3 Hours.

3 credits. This course provides for concurrent field experience and is designed for students who have no training or experience in interviewing and counseling in rehabilitation settings.

RHAB 694. Job Placement in Rehabilitation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Explores occupational information, job matching systems and job placement approaches. Focuses on demand-side job development, job seeking skills training, supported employment, transitional work and placement techniques including job analyses, ADA implementation and labor market surveys.

RHAB 695. Supervised Clinical Practice in Substance Abuse Rehabilitation. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1-6 credits. (1 credit per 100 hours of supervised internship.) May be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisites: Completion of 24 graduate credits including RHAB 691. Requires completion of Certified Rehabilitation Counselor examination and a total of six credits for degree completion. Emphasizes mastery of substance abuse setting specific roles and functions of the professional rehabilitation counselor. Stresses ethical decision making in practice. Involves scheduled seminars and meetings with faculty and agency supervisor.

RHAB 696. Supervised Clinical Practice in Rehabilitation and Mental Health. 3-9 Hours.

Semester course; 3-9 credits (3 credits per 200 hours of supervised internship). Prerequisite: Completion of 36 graduate credits including RHAB 691. Emphasizes mastery of setting-specific roles and functions of the professional rehabilitation and mental health counselor. Stresses ethical decision-making in practice. Involves scheduled seminars and meetings with faculty and agency supervisor. Requires completion of Certified Rehabilitation Counselor examination and a total of 9 credits for degree completion.

RHAB 697. Supervised Clinical Practice in Counseling. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1-6 credits. (1 credit per 100 hours of supervised internship.) May be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisite: Admission into advanced certificate in professional counseling program. Emphasizes advanced development of counseling skills pursuant to licensure or other post-master's training needs. Stresses ethical decision making in practice. Involves scheduled seminars and meetings with faculty and agency supervisor.

School of the Arts

Applied Music (APPM)

APPM 571. Choral Pedagogy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Teaching competencies relative to the choral training and use of the unchanged, changing and matured voice will be stressed. Included are consideration of vocal production, pronunciation, aural skills, reading skills and stylistic interpretation.

APPM 575. Score Reading. 1 Hour.

Continuous courses; 2 laboratory hours. 1-1 credit. Prerequisite: APPM 274 or the equivalent. No degree credit for graduate composition majors. A progressive course in reducing scores at the keyboard, beginning with simple choral scores and progressing to full orchestra and band.

APPM 576. Score Reading. 1 Hour.

Continuous courses; 2 laboratory hours. 1-1 credit. Prerequisite: APPM 274 or the equivalent. No degree credit for graduate composition majors. A progressive course in reducing scores at the keyboard, beginning with simple choral scores and progressing to full orchestra and band.

APPM 585. Opera Theatre. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 4 studio hours. 2 credits. May be repeated up to four times for credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Explores aspects of opera through study, written research and fully staged public performances of operatic scenes and/or one-act operas.

APPM 663. Advanced Pedagogy. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Further study in pedagogical systems and techniques with emphasis on materials for intermediate and advanced-level students. Studio observation will be included. Sections: (1) piano, (2) voice, (3) organ, (4) percussion, (5) brass, (6) woodwinds and (7) strings.

APPM 670. Large Ensembles. 0.5,1 Hours.

Semester course; 3 or 4.5 laboratory hours. 0.5 or 1 credit. Each section may be repeated up to six times for credit. Auditions required for sections 1, 3, and 4. Sections: (1) orchestra, (2) University band, (3) symphonic band, (4) chorus and (5) Choral Arts Society.

APPM 671. Piano Technique Seminar. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Physiology of piano playing. Alternative approaches to building and reconstructing technique.

APPM 673. Piano Literature and Performance Practice. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2, 2 credits. To familiarize the student with a broad repertoire of performing and teaching material. Discussion of approaches to styles and idioms of various periods, solution of technical and musical problems encountered in specific pieces, evaluation of various editions of piano literature.

APPM 674. Piano Literature and Performance Practice. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2, 2 credits. To familiarize the student with a broad repertoire of performing and teaching material. Discussion of approaches to styles and idioms of various periods, solution of technical and musical problems encountered in specific pieces, evaluation of various editions of piano literature.

APPM 675. Teaching Practicum. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. A semester of supervised studio teaching consisting of intermediate and advanced piano literature.

APPM 681. Group Piano Methods and Management. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Management, methods and materials for group teaching. Includes beginning students of all ages, intermediate level students and college keyboard skills classes.

APPM 690. Small Ensembles. 0.5,1 Hours.

Semester course; 2 or 3 laboratory hours. 0.5 or 1 credit. Each section may be repeated up to six times for credit. Auditions required for all sections. Sections: (1) ensemble for new music, (2) the madrigalists, (3) collegium musicum, (4) women's chorus, (5) vocal ensembles, (6) piano ensembles, (7) accompanying, (8) percussion ensemble, (9) percussion lab ensemble, (10) woodwind ensembles, (11) brass ensembles, (12) chamber orchestra, (13) string ensemble, (14) guitar ensembles, (15) small jazz ensembles, (16) jazz orchestra I, (17) jazz orchestra II, (18) jazz orchestra III, (19) basketball pep band.

APPM 799. Recital. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1, 3 and 6 credits. Public presentation of a full recital or lecture recital. Content to be approved by graduate committee. Graded as "S," "U" or "F.

Art Education (ARTE)

ARTE 501. Art Education Elementary Materials and Practicum. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: admission to the art teacher preparation program. A preparatory experience with observation and participation in art programs in elementary grades prior to student teaching. This course explores art materials, techniques and teaching methods suitable for this level and analyzes evaluation strategies appropriate for art.

ARTE 502. Art Education Secondary Materials and Practicum. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: admission to the art teacher preparation program. A preparatory experience with observation and participation in art programs in middle school, high school or nontraditional settings prior to student teaching. This course explores art materials and techniques suitable for these levels, examines developmental performance levels and analyzes evaluation methods appropriate for art.

ARTE 508. Two-dimensional Art Experiences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 seminar and 3 studio hours. 3 credits. Not offered for credit for studio art majors. The course explores the media, techniques and concepts of drawing, painting and printmaking.

ARTE 509. Three-dimensional Art Experiences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 seminar and 3 studio hours. 3 credits. Not offered for credit for studio art majors. Exploration of sculptural concepts with three-dimensional materials such as wood, metal, clay, fiber, plaster, plastic and glass.

ARTE 550. Art for the Exceptional Learner. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 3 credits. A study of exceptional learners including handicapped, gifted, talented, aged and others, and their participation in and appreciation for the visual arts. Courses may include practicum and field experiences.

ARTE 591. Topics in Art Education. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits with different topics. The course will explore selected topics of current interests or needs relative to art education. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

ARTE 592. Independent Study in Art Education. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1-6 credits. Prerequisite: Approval from department chair. Art education majors only. An in-depth study of a selected art education topic.

ARTE 600. Seminar: Issues in Art Education. 3-6 Hours.

Semester course; 3-6 lecture hours. 3-6 credits. The course investigates contemporary issues and identifies problems in art education. Students prepare oral and written reports that explore new directions and discuss the implications for teachers and art programs.

ARTE 601. Elementary Art Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 3 credits. An inquiry into the nature of art and its importance in the elementary curriculum. Through personal experiences with art concepts and media, students learn about themes, form and expression and develop a broader understanding of the value of art for children.

ARTE 611. Theory and Literature in Art Education. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 3,3 seminar hours. 3, 3 credits. An introduction to the body of literature and key issues within the field of art education. Students will also develop an overview of the history of art education as well as an understanding of the major roles that theory plays in the crafting of literature within the field, including the roles of conceptual and theoretical frameworks in conducting and consuming research.

ARTE 612. Theory and Literature in Art Education. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 3,3 seminar hours. 3, 3 credits. An introduction to the body of literature and key issues within the field of art education. Students will also develop an overview of the history of art education as well as an understanding of the major roles that theory plays in the crafting of literature within the field, including the roles of conceptual and theoretical frameworks in conducting and consuming research.

ARTE 665. Curriculum Development and Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. A review of curriculum development including: needs assessment, determination of goals and objectives, curriculum writing, evaluation, and feedback processes. Theoretical approaches in the visual arts will be studied and curriculum models designed, developed and analyzed.

ARTE 670. Technology in Art Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The students examine diverse aspects of new technologies in relation to art programs. These aspects include media and computer-assisted learning, and applications of computer graphics and other technology to artistic expression.

ARTE 680. Teaching Laboratory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Observations and experimental teaching experiences with children in art. Group discussions and evaluation of ideas, objectives and methods.

ARTE 690. Issues and Methods of Inquiry in Art Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Readings and discussions of studies in art education and related research emphasizing possibilities for implementation by art teachers. Methods of research in the field will be reviewed and sample research proposals will be developed by the students.

ARTE 691. Topics in Art Education. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits with different content. The course will explore selected topics of current interests or needs relative to art education. See Schedule of Classes for specific topic to be offered each semester.

ARTE 692. Independent Study in Art Education. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1-6 credits. Prerequisite: Approval from department chair. Art education majors only. An in-depth study of a selected art education topic.

ARTE 701. Issues in Art Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Readings and discussions of current issues in art education, art and education. This course emphasizes contemporary issues and research in the field and makes connections between theory and practice.

ARTE 702. History of Art Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is a survey of the history of art education, its major theories and influences. The emphasis is on the influence of education, art, society and politics on the shaping of art education. While the history of art education from Plato to the present is surveyed, the emphasis is on the past 50 years.

ARTE 703. Contemporary Philosophies and Art Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Readings and discussions of philosophical writings that affect contemporary art education, art and education.

ARTE 704. Research in Art Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Advanced readings and discussions of studies in art education. Advanced methods of research in the field will be reviewed and students will develop a beginning dissertation proposal.

ARTE 780. Cultural Diversity in Art and Society. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Recognizing the complex intersections of art, culture and social issues, this course explores the diverse social and cultural landscape in which art is produced. Students will consider recent and historical examples of how policies and social issues have shaped art production in both U.S. and global contexts.

ARTE 799. Thesis. 1,3 Hour.

Semester course; 1 or 3 credits. May be repeated. Prerequisite: completion of all formal course work, candidacy and approval of the department chair. Preparation of a thesis is based upon independent research.

ARTE 800. Advanced Seminar in Art Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum total of 9 credits. The course investigates contemporary issues and identifies problems in art education. Students prepare oral and written reports to explore new directions and discuss the implications for teachers and art programs.

Art History (ARTH)

ARTH 591. Special Topics in Art History. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-6 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. An in-depth study of a particular aspect of art history or art made in a particular time or place, or by a specific artist or group of artists. Course may include extended off-campus trips to sites and collections throughout the United States or abroad. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

ARTH 598. German for Art Historical Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course. 3 practicum hours. 3 credits. A sustained and progressively complex sequence of exercises in reading and translating art historical research that is written and published in German. Graded P/F.

ARTH 621. Historical Preservation and Architectural History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An introduction to the methods or research, record keeping and reporting used in architectural history, and to the evolution of the discipline, especially in relation to historic preservation.

ARTH 622. Studies in Architectural History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. An advanced, in-depth study of a selected period of architectural history in Europe and/or America. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

ARTH 681. Museums and Communities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. An examination of relationships between museums and communities, focusing on critical/theoretical analyses of how museums have constructed community identities, histories of place and cross-cultural relations. Also provides understanding of organizational structures and the roles and responsibilities of museum administrators.

ARTH 682. The Museum as Educational Institution. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. An overview of the history, theory and practice of museums as educational institutions, focusing on education philosophies and teaching methods as well as criteria for evaluating the educational merit of exhibits and programs. Also provides an understanding of the roles and responsibilities of museum educators and the structural organization of museum departments of education.

ARTH 683. Museum Collections. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. An examination of the history, motivations and procedures of museums collecting. Considers the ethical and logistical issues involved in acquiring objects (through bequests and purchase), in releasing objects (through restitution and deaccessioning) and in stewardship of objects (through conservation and registration). Also provides understanding of the roles and responsibilities of curators, collections managers, registrars and conservators, as well as an understanding of the structural organization of curatorial/collections staff.

ARTH 684. Curating Museum Exhibitions. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ARTH 681, ARTH 682, ARTH 683 or ARTH 691. Students work collaboratively to develop an exhibit script that reflects a contemporary museological issue through the display of artworks and/or artifacts.

ARTH 690. Historiography and Methodology of Art History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. Historiographic overview of art history since the mid-18th century that provides a foundational understanding of the changing methodological and theoretical bases for its disciplinary practices in academia and museums. Critical reading and writing skills and research methods will be developed through class discussion, small assignments and an independent research project in the student's primary area of interest.

ARTH 691. Special Topics in Museum Studies. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. An advanced, in-depth study of museum histories, theories or practices in a particular time period, region or culture.

ARTH 693. Graduate Museum Internship. 3-6 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 3-6 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor, chair of the graduate committee and/or chair of the Department of Art History. Professionally supervised work in a local, regional, national or international museum.

ARTH 694. Art History and Pedagogy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An examination of teaching philosophies and methods that have been enacted in the development of art history curricula, course design, classroom activities and gallery programs within higher education and museum contexts.

ARTH 695. Writing Seminar I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. An investigation and practical application of rhetorical styles of writing for various audiences and purposes in academic, museum and/or online contexts, with particular focus on scholarly writing.

ARTH 721. Seminar in Early Modern Art. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. An advanced, in-depth study of a selected aspect of Renaissance or Baroque art in Europe. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

ARTH 722. Seminar in 19th-century Art. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. An advanced, in-depth study of a selected aspect of 19th-century art in Europe and/or America, including though not limited to movements, artists, new techniques, technologies or display venues. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

ARTH 723. Seminar in 20th-century Art. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. An advanced, in-depth study of a selected aspect of 20th-century art in Europe and/or America, including though not limited to movements, artists, new techniques, technologies or display venues. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

ARTH 725. Seminar in Pre-Columbian Art and Architecture. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Advanced research on specific topics related to the study of pre-Columbian art in the Mesoamerican and Andean regions. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics offered each semester.

ARTH 726. Seminar in African Art. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. A study of the culture and traditional art forms, which may include architecture; sculptural works in wood, stone, ivory and metal; royal attire; jewelry and/or weaponry of a specific African region. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics offered each semester.

ARTH 727. Seminar in Latin American Art. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. In-depth study of specific topics related to the study of Renaissance art in the Caribbean, Mexico, Central America or South America. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics offered each semester.

ARTH 728. Seminar in Asian Art. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. An advanced, in-depth study of a selected aspect of the art of India, Southeast Asia or the Middle East. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

ARTH 741. Seminar in Art and Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. An advanced, detailed investigation of critical, aesthetic or social theories as they relate to the history of art. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics offered each semester.

ARTH 742. Seminar in Trans-millennial Art and Ideas. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. An advanced, detailed investigation of an issue, idea or topic that transcends millennia in the history of art. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics offered each semester.

ARTH 743. Seminar in Art and Representation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. An advanced, detailed investigation of an issue, idea or topic that considers artworks as representations of people, places, ideas, cultural values, etc. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics offered each semester.

ARTH 749. Seminar in Diasporic Art. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. An examination of African-inspired cultural and artistic traditions in North and South America and the Caribbean. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics offered each semester.

ARTH 771. Writing Seminar II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ARTH 695. Provides Master of Arts students with a structure in which to complete a qualifying paper that fulfills degree requirements. Students meet periodically as a group while also working independently with a faculty adviser to articulate a paper topic, conduct research and refine a paper of publishable quality.

ARTH 772. Major Field Exam. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 research hours. 3 credits. Enrollment requires permission of director of graduate studies. Provides doctoral students with opportunities to investigate research areas related to their major field of study. Students work with a faculty adviser to establish a bibliography for independent reading and study in preparation for the major field exam. Graded as Pass/Fail.

ARTH 773. Minor Field Exam. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 research hours. 3 credits. Enrollment requires permission of director of graduate studies. Provides doctoral students with opportunities to investigate research areas related to their minor field of study. Students work with a faculty adviser to establish a bibliography for independent reading and study in preparation for the minor field exam. Graded as Pass/Fail.

ARTH 774. Dissertation Proposal. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 research hours. 3 credits. Enrollment requires permission of director of graduate studies. Students prepare a dissertation proposal under the direction of the dissertation adviser. Graded as S/U/F.

ARTH 791. Special Topics in Art History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 seminar hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. An in-depth investigation of a topic or issue in art history. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics offered each semester.

ARTH 797. Directed Research Project. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor, director of graduate studies and chair of the Department of Art History. Advanced individual work on a subject to be formulated by the student in collaboration with and/or approved by the instructor.

ARTH 798. Museum Thesis Project. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1, 3 or 6 credits. Prerequisite: completion of all formal course work, comprehensive examinations, foreign language examination and permission of departmental graduate committee and museum studies program. The practical application of museological issues, concepts or theories in exhibit curation, education program development, exhibit or program evaluation, collections planning, or policy analysis. A written account of the museological significance of the project is required. Graded as S/U/F.

ARTH 799. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1-6 credits. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Completion of all formal course work, comprehensive examinations, foreign language examination, and approval of the departmental chair of graduate studies and department chair. Preparation of a thesis based on independent research.

ARTH 899. Dissertation Research. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. Variable credit. A minimum of 6 semester hours required; may be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits. Enrollment restricted to students who have achieved Ph.D. candidacy. Preparation of a dissertation based on independent research and in consultation with a faculty dissertation director. Graded S/U/F.

Arts (ARTS)

ARTS 591. Special Topics. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-4 credits. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite: approval of the instructor. Topical course offering a variety of subjects that are not offered as a part of the standard curriculum of any individual department within the School of the Arts. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered.

ARTS 592. Individual Projects/Fieldwork. 1-6 Hours.

Semester courses; 1-6 credits. By appointment with director of graduate studies after approval by department chair. (Obtain individual research project form from the dean's office prior to enrollment.) Individual work for graduate students.

ARTS 601. Seminar in Art. 3 Hours.

Continuous courses; 3-3 credits. Discussion and research in the visual arts providing experience and involvement in the various studio areas for students not concentrating in these areas.

ARTS 602. Seminar in Art. 3 Hours.

Continuous courses; 3-3 credits. Discussion and research in the visual arts providing experience and involvement in the various studio areas for students not concentrating in these areas.

ARTS 690. Methods of Art Research. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 credits. Review of selected research methods relevant to the composition of a thesis in the student's master's degree area. Preparation of a proto-thesis concludes course work.

ARTS 692. Individual Projects/Fieldwork. 1-6 Hours.

Semester courses; 1-6 credits. By appointment with director of graduate studies after approval by department chair. (Obtain individual research project form from the dean's office prior to enrollment.) Individual work for graduate students.

ARTS 705. Research in the Arts. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 3, 6 credits. By appointment with director of graduate studies after approval by department chair. (Obtain individual research project form from the dean's office prior to enrollment.) Individual research for graduate students.

ARTS 706. Research in the Arts. 6 Hours.

Semester courses; 3, 6 credits. By appointment with director of graduate studies after approval by department chair. (Obtain individual research project form from the dean's office prior to enrollment.) Individual research for graduate students.

Craft and Material Studies (CRAF)

CRAF 591. Special Topics and Practicum. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. May be repeated. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A topical seminar/workshop offered in a variety of craft subjects or issues not included in the regular curriculum. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

CRAF 601. Graduate Studies in Metal. 3-9 Hours.

Semester course; 9, 18 or 27 studio hours. 3, 6 or 9 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 36 credits. Personal investigation of materials, processes and attitudes relating to the creative production of metal and/or jewelry forms.

CRAF 621. Graduate Studies in Wood. 3-9 Hours.

Semester course; 9, 18 or 27 studio hours. 3, 6 or 9 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 36 credits. Design, research and experimentation in wood and varied materials relating to a body of work demonstrating the student's mastery of ideation and material.

CRAF 641. Graduate Studies in Clay. 3-9 Hours.

Semester course; 9, 18 or 27 studio hours. 3, 6 or 9 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 36 credits. Problems in the design and production of functional and nonfunctional ceramic objects as well as study of experimentation in ceramic technology and kiln design.

CRAF 651. Graduate Studies in Glass. 3-9 Hours.

Semester course; 9, 18 or 27 studio hours. 3, 6 or 9 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 36 credits. This course is an intensive focus on glass experimentation and its associative properties with the expected outcome of the materialization and realization of each individual’s original research into their studio practice.

CRAF 661. Graduate Studies in Fiber. 3-9 Hours.

Semester course; 9, 18 or 27 studio hours. 3, 6 or 9 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 36 credits. Work in contemporary and traditional textile techniques.

CRAF 680. Graduate Critique. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 9 studio hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. This course explores the meaning and application of critique as it is relates to both students’ own work and the work of others as preparation for thesis or candidacy exhibitions. There will be emphasis placed on the production and presentation of artwork and artist statements.

CRAF 681. Candidacy Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 9 studio hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. This course will provide directed studio work and research. Students will take risks, hone skills, figure out what questions, issues and ideas direct creative work and receive guidance and support from their graduate committee. To be taken the first two semesters of graduate program; in the second semester the student will work with their graduate committee to prepare for candidacy review and exhibition.

CRAF 682. Thesis Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 9 studio hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. This course will provide directed studio work and research. Students will take risks, hone skills, figure out what questions, issues, and ideas direct creative work and receive guidance and support from the their graduate committee. To be taken the final two semesters of graduate program with approval of the department chair and graduate committee; in the second semester the student will work with their graduate committee to prepare for thesis exhibition and the written thesis according to the established written thesis timeline.

CRAF 690. Graduate Seminar. 1,3 Hour.

Seminar course; 1 or 3 lecture hours. 1 or 3 credits. May be repeated. Degree requirement for graduate students in the Department of Crafts. A weekly seminar for the purpose of discussing contemporary issues in the arts as they affect the artist-craftsperson.

CRAF 692. Directed Research. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Approval of supervising faculty member and department chair necessary prior to registration. This course will be limited to graduate students in the Department of Craft and Material Studies in high standing within the program. Learning experiences will be designed with the supervising faculty member in the form of a contract between student and instructor.

Design (DESI)

DESI 510. Materials and Methods Studio. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 6 studio hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of program director. Studio course that develops skills in the use of materials, methods and technologies relevant to a broad range of activities pertaining to design.

DESI 511. Studio in Digital Design and Fabrication Technology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 3 studio hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of program director. A studio-based examination of design research methods with emphasis placed on new technology of three-dimensional digital design and fabrication. The studio will utilize recently installed and existing facilities, faculty and resources at Digital Fabrication Lab at VCUQatar.

DESI 512. Studio in Visual Communications. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 3 studio hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of program director. A studio-based examination of design research methods with emphasis placed on time-based media production. The course is designed to provide a lab/studio opportunity for students to develop media skills while focusing on individual production, collaborative projects and critical discussion. The studio will utilize recently installed and existing facilities, faculty, and resources at Media Lab at VCUQatar.

DESI 520. Design Research Methodologies. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 3 studio hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of program director. A studio-based examination of design research methods with emphasis placed on linking knowledge, comprehension and application of historic and emerging methods of experimentation to generative and iterative studies.

DESI 601. Interdisciplinary Design Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A seminar to examine the theories and practices related to the contemporary designer’s role in the technological, psychological, cultural and aesthetic environment. The seminar will include exploration of historical and contemporary art, architecture, communications, cultural theory and design criticism. The course involves intensive professional debate of various aspects of interdisciplinary design practice, ongoing group discussion, and exercises in critical writing. Professionals at the university and outside of the university will be invited for participation.

DESI 605. Design Strategies and Ethics for Business. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An investigation of precedents and potentials for application of design methods and processes to the development of business strategies and ethics.

DESI 611. Design Studio One. 6 Hours.

Semester course; 12 studio hours. 6 credits. A topical studio focusing on research, experimentation and problem-solving methods from a cross section of design disciplines.

DESI 612. Design Studio Two. 6 Hours.

Semester course; 12 studio hours. 6 credits. Studio course focusing on interdisciplinary, team-based approaches to identifying and solving advanced design problems.

DESI 613. Design Studio Three. 6 Hours.

Semester course; 12 studio hours. 6 credtis. Prerequisites: successful completion of 30 credits of graduate study and permission of the program director. Studio course focusing on experimentation, analysis and development of creative projects that directly contribute to a design brief to be used as a basis for the final thesis.

DESI 620. Design Thesis Research and Formulation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 3 studio hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: successful completion of 30 credit hours of graduate study and permission of the program director. Students examine applied research methods with emphasis placed on comprehension and analysis of case studies and then apply design research methods to test original proposals in a studio environment. Through development of design processes, students define an individual or team project of complex scope and intensity.

DESI 621. Design Research Studio: Leadership and Entrepreneurship. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 6 studio hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: successful completion of 30 credit hours of graduate study and permission of the program director. Students evaluate emerging leadership methodologies by applying lessons from case studies and emerging fields of knowledge. Course provides collaborative and presentation opportunities.

DESI 630. Teaching Practicum in Design. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 6 practicum hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: completion of 18 credit hours of graduate study. Exploration of philosophical, informational and technical aspects of design education. Observation, instruction and practice in teaching. Topics include effective teaching strategies, curriculum development, learning styles and evaluation techniques. Graded as P/F.

DESI 631. Design Internship. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 6 studio hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: successful completion of 30 credit hours of graduate study and permission of the program director. Provides supervised practical work experience that is coordinated with professional designers under the guidance of the design faculty. Internship placement is based upon research interest. Graded as P/F.

DESI 690. Thesis Studio. 1-9 Hours.

Semester course; vairable hours (2 studio hours per credit; 1 seminar hour per 3 credits). 1, 3, 6 or 9 credits. Prerequisites: successful completion of 30 credit hours of graduate study and permission of the program director. This course will support and assist the student in the development and completion of the final thesis project. Executed under the supervision of a graduate adviser and review committee. Graded as S/U/F.

DESI 692. Interdisciplinary Design Research/Individual Study. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 3-9 studio hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated. The structuring, research, execution and presentation of an independent project in interdisciplinary design under the guidance of a faculty member.

Graphic Design (GDES)

GDES 567. Visual Interface Design. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A course concentrating on the visual design and development of human-computer interface systems. Emphasis is placed on visual design processes and methods in the diverse arena of user interface design.

GDES 591. Advanced Studio Topics in Visual Communications. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 3 studio hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Topical studio focusing on research and experimentation in specialized visual communication media.

GDES 593. Visual Communications Internship. 3,6 Hours.

Semester course; 3 or 6 credits. May be repeated to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of chair required. Supervised study in cross-disciplinary visual communications research projects to integrate theory with practice. Training is provided under the direction and supervision of qualified professional practitioners and a faculty adviser.

GDES 610. Visual Communications Workshop. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the graduate director. A studio course focusing on the philosophical, communicative and aesthetic relationships of visual communications problem-solving and the effective articulation of concepts.

GDES 611. Visual Communications Workshop. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 sutdio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum total of 16 credits. Prerequisite: permission of the graduate director. A studio course focusing on the philosophical, communicative and aesthetic relationships of visual communications problem solving and the effective articulation of concepts.

GDES 612. Research Methods in Visual Communications. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and 3 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: permission of program director. A studio-based examination of design research methods with emphasis place on linking knowledge, comprehension and application of historic and emerging methods of experimentation to generative and iterative studies. The course culminates in the writing and presentation of a research proposal for the second year of study.

GDES 621. Visual Communications Seminar. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 4 lecture hours. 4 credits. May be repeated. A detailed examination of selected theoretical, historical, aesthetic and social areas of concern to the designer. Scholarly research, critical analysis and discussion are expected.

GDES 631. Visual Communications Teaching Practicum. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 6 practicum hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of department chair. Observation, instruction, and practice to develop skills in the design, organization, and conduct of courses in visual communications. Explores multiple teaching strategies, student development, learning styles, and evaluation techniques.

GDES 692. Visual Communications Research/Individual Study. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 6 studio hours. 3 credits. May be repeated. The structuring, research, execution, and presentation of an independent project in visual communications under the guidance of a faculty adviser.

GDES 698. Research Documentation and Exhibition Design. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 3 studio hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of program director. A studio-based course focusing on the design and production of final research documentation in both book and exhibition formats.

GDES 699. Directed Thesis Research in Visual Communications. 1-8 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours (three studio hours per credit). 1, 4 or 8 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisites: successful completion of 30 credit hours of graduate study and permission of department chair. Supervised investigation and presentation of selected problems in visual communications. Executed under the supervision of a graduate adviser and review committee.

Interior Design (IDES)

IDES 500. Art and Design Methods Workshop. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 4 studio hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits. Open only to first-professional track graduate students in interior environments. Provides accelerated instruction in art and design methods for the student with no art background by fully immersing the student in a rigorous studio environment. Focuses on the development of 2-D and 3-D art and design skills including 2-D design methods, 3-D design methods, color theory, and drawing and presentation methods.

IDES 501. Introductory Graduate Design Studio I. 6 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 8 studio hours. 6 credits. Corequisite: IDES 511. Open to professional entry-level track graduate students in interior environments only. Provides accelerated studio and graphics instruction for designing interior environments for the entering professional entry-level track student that does not have previous experience in interior design. Introduces theories, methods and processes of interior design, facilitates specific interior design applications and focuses on analysis and evaluation of interior environments. Course work is highly sequenced and accelerates in complexity as the semester progresses and combines the development of technical skills with conceptual thinking and design development processes. Course emphasizes interior design development through studio projects and the development of the skills and practices of interior design.

IDES 502. Introductory Graduate Design Studio II. 6 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 8 studio hours. 6 credits. Corequisite: IDES 512. Open to professional entry-level track graduate students in interior environments only. Provides accelerated studio and graphics instruction for designing interior environments for the entering professional entry-level track student that does not have previous experience in interior design. Introduces theories, methods and processes of interior design, facilitates specific interior design applications and focuses on analysis and evaluation of interior environments. Course work is highly sequenced and accelerates in complexity as the semester progresses and combines the development of technical skills with conceptual thinking and design development processes. Course emphasizes interior design development through studio projects and the development of the skills and practices of interior design.

IDES 511. Introductory Graduate Graphics I. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 1 lecture and 4 studio hours. 3 credits. Corequisite: IDES 501 for IDES 511, IDES 502 for 512. Open to professional entry-level track graduate students in interior environments only. Provides accelerated manual and computer graphics instruction for designing interior environments for the entering professional entry-level track student who does not have previous experience in interior design graphics. Course work is highly sequenced and accelerates in complexity as the semester progresses.

IDES 512. Introductory Graduate Graphics II. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 1 lecture and 4 studio hours. 3 credits. Corequisite: IDES 501 for IDES 511, IDES 502 for 512. Open to professional entry-level track graduate students in interior environments only. Provides accelerated manual and computer graphics instruction for designing interior environments for the entering professional entry-level track student who does not have previous experience in interior design graphics. Course work is highly sequenced and accelerates in complexity as the semester progresses.

IDES 521. Advanced Material Studies for Interior Environments. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Open only to first-professional track graduate students in interior environments. Investigation, selection and practical application of materials and textiles in interior environments.

IDES 522. Environmental Factors for Interior Environments. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Open to first-professional track students only. Contemporary theories and techniques in the design of buildings as related to interior design, small structural considerations, HVAC, acoustics, plumbing and the attributes of building materials.

IDES 591. Topics in Interior Design. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Explores selected topics of current and relevant interest in interior design. Topics will vary each semester and focus on the needs of the student.

IDES 601. Graduate Interior Environments Studio. 6 Hours.

Semester course; 12 studio hours. 6 credits. May be repeated twice. Open to graduate students in interior environments; graduate students from other School of the Arts graduate programs may enroll with the consent of the instructor. Prerequisites: IDES 501, 502, 511, 512 for professional entry-level students; none for post-professional students. Provides advanced studio for designing in specialized areas of interior environments. Topics will vary each semester.

IDES 611. Advanced Graphics for Interior Environments I. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 4 studio hours. 2 credits. Open only to first-professional track graduate students in interior environments. Provides advanced graphics instruction for designing interior environments for the first-professional track student. Course work is highly sequenced and accelerates in complexity as the semester progresses and focuses on the development of technical drawing, rendering and presentation skills for the interior designer.

IDES 612. Advanced Graphics for Interior Environments II. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 4 studio hours. 2 credits. Open only to first-professional track graduate students in interior environments. Provides advanced graphics instruction for designing interior environments for the first-professional track student using the computer. Course work is highly sequenced and accelerates in complexity as the semester progresses and focuses on the development of computer-based skills and programs such as AutoCAD, 3-D Viz and Form Z.

IDES 623. Advanced Design Studies. 3,6 Hours.

Semester course; 3 or 6 lecture/seminar hours. 3 or 6 credits. May be repeated. Prerequisites: IDES 501, 502, 511, 512 for professional entry-level students; none for post-professional students. Interior design majors only. Supervised investigation and presentation of selected problems and issues in interior design.

IDES 624. Advanced Furniture Design. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 4 studio hours. 2 credits. For first-professional track students only. Advanced study of furniture design and custom millwork as related to the design of interior environments. Original student designs are developed through the study of structure and materials.

IDES 626. Advanced Light and Color for Interior Environments. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Open only to first-professional track graduate students in interior environments. The study of illumination and its impact on people in interior spaces; theory and practical applications.

IDES 631. Ethics and Business Procedures for Interior Environments. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Open only to first-professional track graduate students in interior environments. Advanced study of the interior design profession as related to professional and business practices including: responsibilities, services, ethics, business and project management, and marketing.

IDES 635. Teaching Practicum in Interior Environments. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 6 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Completion of one graduate studio. Familiarizes students with different types of teaching methods and practices in interior design curriculums. Observation, instruction and practice in the design, organization, and conduct of courses in interior design. Explores multiple teaching strategies, student development, learning styles and evaluation techniques.

IDES 651. History and Theory of Interior Environments I. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Open only to first-professional students. Study of the major paradigms, theories and styles of the built environment (interior design, furniture and architecture) from antiquity to the late-19th century.

IDES 652. History and Theory of Interior Environments II. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Study of the major paradigms, theories and styles of architecture, interior environments and furniture from the beginnings of modernism to the present day.

IDES 690. Graduate Seminar in Interior Environments. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A detailed selected investigation of theoretical, historical, aesthetic and social areas of concern to the interior designer. Scholarly research, critical analysis and discussion are expected. The course requires investigative work using resources such as library and archive materials, journals, Internet sources, surveys, oral histories, interviews, case study design, and field documentation and evaluation.

IDES 692. Independent Study in Interior Environments. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1-6 lecture hours. 1-6 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Interior environments majors only. Prerequisite: approval from department chair. An in-depth study of a selected interior design topic.

IDES 693. Interior Design Internship. 3,6 Hours.

Semester course; 6, 8 or 12 studio hours. 3, 4 or 6 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Interior design majors only. Provides supervised practical work experiences that are coordinated with professional interior designers under the guidance of interior design faculty. Formal arrangements must be made. Graded P/F.

IDES 699. Creative Project - Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 2, 6 or 12 studio hours. 1, 3 or 6 credits. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Approval of Departmental Review Committee. The project must test an original design theory synthesized through the development of a design process, investigative research and an individual project of complex scale and scope.

IDES 800. Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: graduate status and permission of chair. Explores the foundation and procedures of architectural and design research. Evidence-based design, alternate research methodologies and their philosophical and epistemological limitations.

IDES 801. Theories of Art and Design. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: graduate status and permission of chair. Development of art, architectural and design theories from antiquity to present. Emphasis is on the writings of contemporary leading theorists and historians. Students will apply these theories to contemporary current solutions as related to the creation of a healing environment; or students may explore the history of medicine or healing as expressed in the fine and applied arts.

IDES 811. Interdisciplinary Health Care Design Workshop I. 3 Hours.

One-week workshop. 3 credits. Prerequisites: graduate status and permission of chair. Contemporary issues in health care professions, health care design and environmental stewardship. Course consists of a one-week workshop that offers lectures from leading experts on a selected issue and an interdisciplinary design problem. Students receive reading assignments to be completed prior to the workshop. After the workshop, during exam week, students meet to present their solution to the design problem to the class and invited guest critics. Students also complete an original research paper on the design problem.

IDES 812. Interdisciplinary Health Care Design Workshop II. 3 Hours.

One-week workshop. 3 credits. Prerequisites: IDES 811, graduate status and permission of chair. Contemporary issues in health care professions, health care design and environmental stewardship. Course consists of a one-week workshop that offers lectures from leading experts on a selected issue and an interdisciplinary design problem. Students receive reading assignments to be completed prior to the workshop. After the workshop, during exam week, students meet to present their solution to the design problem to the class and invited guest critics. Students also complete an original research paper on the design problem.

IDES 820. Selected Topics in Health Care Design I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: graduate status and permission of chair. Selected topics in health, health care design and health care administration.

IDES 821. Selected Topics in Health Care Design II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: IDES 820 and graduate status. Continued exploration of selected topics in health, health care design and health care administration.

IDES 899. Dissertation. 3-12 Hours.

Variable hours. 3-12 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ABD status. Research and work leading to the completion of the dissertation thesis or dissertation project. Graded S/U/F.

Kinetic Imaging (KINE)

KINE 500. Graduate Studio. 8 Hours.

Semester course; 16 lab/studio hours. 8 credits. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits. Prerequisite: admission to the kinetic imaging track of the MFA in Fine Arts program or permission of graduate adviser. Emphasis on individual creative production focusing on video, animation and sound, with periodic exposure of student's work and ideas to the critical attention of the teaching faculty of the Department of Kinetic Imaging. Degree requirement for first-year graduate students in department.

KINE 510. Foundations in Media. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: admission to the kinetic imaging track of the MFA in Fine Arts program or permission of graduate adviser. A seminar focusing on a historical overview of media arts, including video art, experimental animation, sound art, performance, installation and critical theory. Designed to equalize the base of knowledge among graduate students from various backgrounds and levels of familiarity with issues in contemporary media.

KINE 591. Topics in Contemporary Media. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lab/studio hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: admission to the kinetic imaging track of the MFA in Fine Arts program or permission of graduate adviser. Explores selected topics of current interests or needs relative to digital media. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topic to be offered each semester.

KINE 600. Graduate Studio. 8 Hours.

Semester course; 16 lab/studio hours. 8 credits. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits. Prerequisite: KINE 500. Emphasis on individual creative production focusing on video, animation and sound, with periodic exposure of student's work and ideas to the critical attention of the teaching faculty of the Department of Kinetic Imaging. Degree requirement for second-year graduate students in the department.

KINE 690. Graduate Seminar. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 4 lecture hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits. Prerequisite: admission to the kinetic imaging track of the MFA in Fine Arts program or permission of graduate adviser. Weekly seminar for the purpose of exploring recent developments in media and conducting critiques in which students can discuss the ideas and attitudes manifest in their work. Degree requirement for graduate students in the Department of Kinetic Imaging.

KINE 691. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and kinetic imaging area head. Students will pursue advanced, individually directed study under the guidance of a faculty adviser. Includes project research, creative execution and presentation.

KINE 692. Graduate Seminar. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 4 lecture hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits. Prerequisite: admission to the kinetic imaging track of the M.F.A. in Fine Arts program or permission of a kinetic imaging graduate adviser. Weekly seminar for the purpose of exploring artistic developments and critical issues in media. Provides students with critical evaluation of their work in relation to contemporary practice while focusing on their final thesis exhibition. Degree requirement for graduate students in the Department of Kinetic Imaging.

KINE 695. Advanced Sound. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lab/studio hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits. Prerequisite: experience with mulitchannel sound software such as Pro Tools. Focuses on sound as a medium and its connection to animation and video. Designed as an advanced studio course where students develop their own aesthetic in sound and explore creative possibilities. Expands on recording and mixing techniques with a particular focus on 5.1 surround sound mixing for video, animation and sound art.

Music Composition (MUSC)

MUSC 611. Analysis for Performance and Composition. 2 Hours.

Continuous courses; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Analysis of the organization, combination, and manipulation of elements devices of music from the 18th century to the present with demonstration of this knowledge through performance.

MUSC 612. Analysis for Performance and Composition. 2 Hours.

Continuous courses; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Analysis of the organization, combination, and manipulation of elements devices of music from the 18th century to the present with demonstration of this knowledge through performance.

MUSC 620. Composition Seminar. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. May be repeated up to four times for credit. Discussion, analysis, and criticism of selected compositions pertinent to the improvement of student skills and understanding.

Music Education (MUED)

MUED 583. Special Workshop in Music Education. 0.5-3 Hours.

Semester course; 0.5-3 credits. Flexible term courses on selected aspects of music education. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

MUED 591. Topics in Music Education. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits with different topics. Flexible semester courses in selected topics in music education philosophy, curriculum, integrated and interdisciplinary arts, technology and selected topics of current interest or needs relative to music education. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

MUED 600. Seminar in Music Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated up to two times with different topics. Investigation of contemporary issues and problems in music education. Students will present oral reports and written papers, which explore new directions and implications for music educators and music education programs.

MUED 604. Choral Conducting and Rehearsal Techniques. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course will seek to develop the skills of the choral conductor in rehearsal and performance. Instruction in rehearsal technique and pacing, conducting technique and interpretive gesture, choral diction, score analysis and preparation, performance practices, and the affective/effective conductor will be applied to individual student performance at the podium.

MUED 606. Choral Literature and Style. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course will provide the practicing choral musician with a survey of choral repertoire through the ages, highlighting various genres within each historical period. Emphasis will be placed on stylistic considerations and performance practices. Students will be engaged in determining the standards which define quality choral repertoire.

MUED 608. Teaching the Adolescent Singer. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. In this course students will study psychological, behavioral and developmental aspects of the young singer. An in-depth look at the characteristics of the changing male and female voice will include research and conclude with observations of adolescent voices. The class will also cover range, registration and choral repertoire appropriate for the various stages of the adolescent singer.

MUED 610. Psychology of Music. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides an introduction of the psychological foundations of music behavior. Topics will include functions of music in human society and culture, psychoacoustics of musical sound, cognitive processes of music perception and the creation/recreation of music, affective response, music learning theories and measurement of musical ability and learning.

MUED 614. Instrumental Conducting Techniques. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Students in this class will discuss literature, score study strategies, rehearsal techniques and ensemble motivation issues. Conducting technique and rehearsal technique will be developed by hands-on experiences with a workshop band, as well as through guided discussions and classroom sessions. The goal is personal musical growth and enhanced podium effectiveness for each participant.

MUED 616. Researching the Wind Band: Strategies and Resources. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This class is designed to enable students to gain greater access to information relative to all aspects of the wind band. Students will become familiar with a wide variety of sources including written materials, Web-based materials, recordings, video and organizations. There will also be assignments to acquaint students with methods used in the various facets of wind band research.

MUED 618. History and Literature of the Wind Band. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. In this class students will study the historical development of wind bands and wind band repertoire. The result of this study will be to enable students to evaluate new repertoire by comparison to masterworks and to be able to place pieces into a historical continuum. Studying the history of wind bands is necessary to understand the current state of the profession and how wind bands fit into the broader spectrum of music history.

MUED 620. Introduction to Research in Music Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Development of fundamental skills necessary to understand and evaluate research in music education. Focuses on the basic principles, concepts and techniques of research methodology applied specifically to music education. Includes introduction to quantitative, qualitative, ethnographic and historical methodology.

MUED 676. School Music Supervision and Administration. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. The study of the organization, curriculum, course content, administration, and personnel problems in public school music.

MUED 783. Final Project in Music Education. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 laboratory hour. 1 credit. May be repeated for a total of 5 credits. The final project is an intensive experience in identifying and developing a topic of interest and value to the student and the profession, and the final presentation of that topic. This course is part of the culminating process for the music education track in the Master of Music program. As an individualized project/course, the faculty chair provides initial approval and gauges progress toward completion of the final project. It is the responsibility of the student to maintain consistent communication with their chair throughout the semester to ensure adequate progress is being made. Completion is determined by the final approval of the faculty chair and committee (if applicable). Completion of the final project is not determined by total number of credits earned in the course. Graded as S/U/F.

MUED 799. Thesis. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Permission of the music education coordinator. Preparation of a thesis based on independent research.

Music History, Literature and Theory (MHIS)

MHIS 513. Arranging. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Practical, technical, and conceptual considerations of arranging and transcribing for vocal and instrumental groups will be explored. Students will demonstrate competence in these creative areas to the optimum level of school and/or church music organizations.

MHIS 551. Orchestral Repertoire. 1,2 Hour.

Semester courses; 1 lecture or 1 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 1 or 2 credits. Performance and study of selected major symphonic works from historical, analytical, and stylistic perspectives. Research reports will include comparisons of interpretations. Repertoire will consist of basic audition pieces selected by orchestras. Laboratory sessions will utilize available instrumentation for performance.

MHIS 552. Orchestral Repertoire. 1-2 Hours.

Semester courses; 1 lecture or 1 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 1 or 2 credits. Performance and study of selected major symphonic works from historical, analytical, and stylistic perspectives. Research reports will include comparisons of interpretations. Repertoire will consist of basic audition pieces selected by orchestras. Laboratory sessions will utilize available instrumentation for performance.

MHIS 566. Jazz History and Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An examination of the evolution of jazz from its beginnings through the Swing Era. Students will transcribe and analyze improvised solos and compositions by the tradition's principal innovators.

MHIS 591. Topics in Music. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Flexible term courses in selected aspects of music performance, theory, literature, or history. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

MHIS 592. Individual Project. 1-6 Hours.

Semester courses; 1-6 credits. Prerequisites: permission of supervising faculty member, adviser and department chair. Open only to degree-seeking graduate students in music. Individual work in an area not otherwise available to the student.

MHIS 615. Seminar in Music Theory. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. May be repeated up to four times with different topics. Topical discussions and relevant research appropriate to the principal eras of music development.

MHIS 650. Seminar in Music History. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. May be repeated up to four times with different topics. Prerequisite: MHIS 690. An intensive study of a limited phase or segment of music history through examination of relevant materials and extended class discussion.

MHIS 666. 20th-century Music. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: MHIS 690 (may be taken concurrently). Impressionistic, expressionistic, neoclassic, and neoromantic influences and styles of music. Development of new sound-generating techniques and methods for ordering the new tonal materials.

MHIS 667. Music of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: MHIS 690 (may be taken concurrently). Principal musical developments from the first through the 16th centuries. Sacred and secular monophonic, homophonic, and polyphonic forms and styles; the development of instrumental idioms and forms.

MHIS 668. Music of the Baroque. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: MHIS 690 (may be taken concurrently). Principal developments, c. 1590-1750; accompanied monody and the beginning of opera; forms and styles of sacred and secular compositions.

MHIS 669. Music of Rococo and Classical Eras. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: MHIS 690 (may be taken concurrently). Major development in sacred and secular forms and styles, c. 1730-1828; social and artistic influences on music; dominance of instrumental music; Mozart, Beethoven, and the German Symphony.

MHIS 670. Music of the Romantic Era. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: MHIS 690 (may be taken concurrently). Influence of the Romantic Era on concepts of musical forms and styles; the development of the art song, the growth of opera, the exploitation of instruments and tonality.

MHIS 690. Bibliography and Methods of Research. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. A course to introduce graduate students to the chief bibliographic materials in music and music education to help develop skills of research and writing necessary to produce a thesis or other formal research paper.

MHIS 692. Individual Project. 1-6 Hours.

Semester courses; 1-6 credits. Prerequisites: permission of supervising faculty member, adviser and department chair. Open only to degree-seeking graduate students in music. Individual work in an area not otherwise available to the student.

MHIS 798. Research Project. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 credits. Corequisite: APPM 799 Final research or expository document for performance and composition majors. Content to be approved by graduate committee.

Painting and Printmaking (PAPR)

PAPR 525. Issues in Contemporary Visual Arts. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite: Painting and printmaking majors only. The investigation of content and meaning of major directions in contemporary art as they relate to the studio. Students will relate their own work to major movements in contemporary visual art.

PAPR 527. Art and Critical Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 3 lecture hours. 3, 3 credits. Prerequisite: General art history or equivalent. Major themes in art criticism and theory from 1940 to the present. This course provides an introduction to the literature of art criticism as well as artists' writings in relation to studio production.

PAPR 528. Art and Critical Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 3 lecture hours. 3, 3 credits. Prerequisite: General art history or equivalent. Major themes in art criticism and theory from 1940 to the present. This course provides an introduction to the literature of art criticism as well as artists' writings in relation to studio production.

PAPR 591. Topics in Painting and Printmaking. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; 1-4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits with different content. This course will explore selected topics of current interests or needs relative to painting and printmaking. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

PAPR 605. Graduate Painting. 3,6 Hours.

Semester course; 6 or 12 studio hours. 3 or 6 credits. May be repeated. A studio class in which primary emphasis is placed on the creative disciplines of contemporary painting. Special attention is given to the development of personal expression through individual criticism.

PAPR 615. Graduate Printmaking. 3,6 Hours.

Semester courses; 6 or 12 studio hours. 3 or 6 credits. May be repeated. Specialization in one printmaking medium with emphasis upon technical research and the aesthetic suitability of design to medium.

PAPR 621. Graduate Drawing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 6 studio hours. 3 credits. May be repeated. A studio class with individual criticism. Special attention is given to contemporary concepts. Permission of instructor required for non-painting and printmaking majors.

PAPR 690. Graduate Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1 or 3 lecture hours. 1 or 3 credits. May be repeated. Degree requirement for graduate students in the Department of Painting and Printmaking. Weekly seminar for the purpose of discussion of recent artistic developments in painting and printmaking. Critiques dealing with student work will take place.

Photography and Film (PHTO)

PHTO 500. Photographic Studio and Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 6 studio hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. A seminar that examines the technical and aesthetic components of photography and filmmaking processes and the language and theories of photography and film criticism.

PHTO 601. Photographic Studio. 3,6 Hours.

Semester course; 6 or 12 studio hours. 3 or 6 credits. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Nonmajors may enroll with permission of instructor. Student will work on specific problems relating to the areas of their major interests. Options will be available in black and white photography, color photography, and motion picture photography.

PHTO 621. Research in Photography and Film. 3,6 Hours.

Semester course; 6 or 12 studio hours. 3 or 6 credits. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Nonmajors may enroll with permission of instructor. Students will engage in appropriate theoretical, experimental, or historical research in a specific area.

PHTO 690. Seminar in Photography and Film. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated. An examination of contemporary issues and developments in photography and film. Students will have a chance to discuss their work and the work of others.

PHTO 692. Independent Study in Photography and Film. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable lecture hours. 1 to 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Individual instruction and supervision of a special project. Learning experiences should be designed with the supervising faculty member in the form of a contract between student and instructor.

PHTO 693. Fieldwork, Internship. 3,6 Hours.

Semester course; 6 or 12 studio hours. 3 or 6 credits. May be repeated. Professional field experience in the theoretical and practical applications of photography and/or film through cooperative organizations. Formal arrangements will be made with state agencies, industries, community organizations, and professionals in the field.

PHTO 699. Graduate Exhibition. 1,3 Hour.

Semester course; 1 or 3 lecture hours. 1 or 3 credits. May be repeated. To be taken after M.F.A. candidacy with the approval of the graduate director and department chair and review of the student’s record. Students prepare and execute a public exhibit of their creative work and provide complete documentation of the sources and ideas presented.

Sculpture and Extended Media (SCPT)

SCPT 500. Graduate Sculpture. 2-6 Hours.

Semester course; 4, 8 or 12 studio hours. 2, 4 or 6 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 20 credits. Emphasis on individual creative production with periodic exposure of student's work and ideas to the critical attention of the teaching faculty of the department of sculpture and other graduate students.

SCPT 517. Seminar in Contemporary Sculpture. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. A forum for consideration and discussion of recent developments in the field.

SCPT 591. Topics in Sculpture. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. This course will explore selected topics of current interests or needs relative to sculpture. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

SCPT 600. Graduate Sculpture. 2-6 Hours.

Semester course; 4, 8 or 12 studio hours. 2, 4 or 6 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 28 credits. Emphasis on individual creative production with periodic exposure of student's work and ideas to the critical attention of the teaching faculty of the department of sculpture and other graduate students.

SCPT 690. Graduate Seminar. 1,4 Hour.

Semester course; 4 lecture hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 16 credits. Degree requirement for graduate students in the department of sculpture. Weekly seminar for the purpose of exploring recent developments in sculpture and conducting critiques in which students can discuss the ideas and attitudes manifest in their work.

SCPT 692. Independent Study in Sculpture. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; variable lecture hours. 1 to 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. This course will be limited to graduate students in sculpture in high standing within the program. Learning experiences will be designed with the supervising faculty member in the form of a contract between student and instructor.

Theatre (THEA)

THEA 501. Basic Voice and Speech Pedagogy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Exploration of methodologies used in teaching basic principles of body alignment, breath support, resonance and dynamics of voice and speech. A review of IPA as it applies to American speech and dialect study.

THEA 502. Basic Voice and Speech Pedagogy With Application to Dialect Study. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Review of IPA. Study of six dialects while investigation a variety of teaching methodologies.

THEA 505. Advanced Scene Design III. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 4 studio hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: THEA 306 and permission of instructor. Intensive study of the professional standards and practices expected of scene designers.

THEA 506. Advanced Scene Design IV. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 4 studio hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: THEA 505 and permission of instructor. Continued intensive study of the professional standards and practices expected of scene designers.

THEA 508. Scene Painting. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 10 studio hours. 3 credits. May be repeated with permission of instructor for up to 12 credits. Study of the materials and techniques of scenic painting as well as the practices and expectations of those pursuing careers as scenic artists.

THEA 509. Theatre History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Study of modern theatre practice, dramatic literature and theory from the development of naturalism through the late 20th century.

THEA 510. Theatre Historiography. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Study of how theatre history is documented and researched, and the theoretical perspectives that inform its writing.

THEA 513. Graduate Acting. 3 Hours.

Continuous courses; 6 studio hours. 3-3 credits. Graduate-level studio performance courses that utilize monologues and scenes as a venue to explore rotating topics in performance technique which may include Constantin Stanislavski, Michael Chekov, Uta Hagen, Sanford Meisner and Stella Adler.

THEA 514. Graduate Acting. 3 Hours.

Continuous courses; 6 studio hours. 3-3 credits. Graduate-level studio performance courses that utilize monologues and scenes as a venue to explore rotating topics in performance technique which may include Constantin Stanislavski, Michael Chekov, Uta Hagen, Sanford Meisner and Stella Adler.

THEA 517. Physical Acting. 3 Hours.

Semester course; may be repeated for a total of 12 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Exploration and discovery of the principles of movement and their practical application to the stage. Emphasis on character development, solo and group scene work, physical comedy, and stage combat.

THEA 518. The Pedagogy of Movement. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 6 studio hours. 3 credits. Exploration of the principles of teaching movement and its practical application to the stage, with special emphasis on the links between physical theatre and the vocabulary of the Stanislavski system of acting.

THEA 593. Professional Internship. 3-9 Hours.

Semester course; 3-9 credits. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Permission of department chair. Majors only. A practicum in theatre conducted in cooperation with selected professional or semiprofessional theatre organizations.

THEA 601. Advanced Voice and Speech Pedagogy: Shakespeare. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An exploration of a variety of methodologies used in teaching the speaking of Shakespeare's texts. Focus on scansion, rhetorical devices, full voicing and support of Shakespeare's language for the stage.

THEA 602. Advanced Topics in Voice and Speech Pedagogy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An exploration of a variety of specialty topics which may include but is not limited to vocal extremes, archetypes and the voice, voice in the out of doors.

THEA 603. Dramatic Literature and Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Multicultural study of selected plays in the history of dramatic literature, criticism and theory.

THEA 604. Modern Theatre: Theory and Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Seminar in the performance practices, texts and theories that have shaped the theatre throughout the 20th century.

THEA 605. Advanced Studies in Stage Design. 3 Hours.

Continuous courses; 1 lecture and 4 studio hours. 3-3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. An advanced study in specific problems in stage design.

THEA 606. Advanced Studies in Stage Design. 3 Hours.

Continuous courses; 1 lecture and 4 studio hours. 3-3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. An advanced study in specific problems in stage design.

THEA 607. Problems in Scenic Techniques. 3 Hours.

Continuous courses; 1 lecture and 4 studio hours. 3-3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. An advanced, detailed study of selected problems in contemporary theory and practice of scenic techniques.

THEA 608. Problems in Scenic Techniques. 3 Hours.

Continuous courses; 1 lecture and 4 studio hours. 3-3 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. An advanced, detailed study of selected problems in contemporary theory and practice of scenic techniques.

THEA 609. Seminar in Production Process. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 4 laboratory hours. 3 credits. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credits. Students and faculty in design, technical theatre, and performance working together in studio situations to identify and solve problems relating to the planning, preparation, and realization of productions.

THEA 613. Advanced Problems in Acting. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. May be repeated with permission of instructor. Focus on acting problems related to the actor's needs to develop proficiency in craft areas.

THEA 614. Pedagogy of Acting. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course guides students through creating and implementing a curriculum appropriate for a beginning acting class. Discussions of acting theory and teaching practice are interspersed with teaching demonstrations complete with peer feedback and instructor critique.

THEA 617. Special Topics in Physical Acting. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 6 studio hours. 3 credits. Rotating topics in physical acting, which may include mask, mime, physical comedy, clowning and other approached to physical theatre.

THEA 618. Special Topics in Choreography and Directing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 6 studio hours. 3 credits. Rotating topics in choreography and directing, which may include dance, stage combat, battle scenes, musicalized movement and other choreographic scenes.

THEA 619. Theatre Pedagogy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Theory and practice in the teaching of college-level theatre.

THEA 621. Problems in Costume Design. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 2 studio hours. 3, 3 credits. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. An advanced study in specific problems in costume design.

THEA 622. Problems in Costume Design. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 2 studio hours. 3, 3 credits. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. An advanced study in specific problems in costume design.

THEA 623. Advanced Studies in Modern Drama. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3, 3 credits. Intensive, detailed studies of selected subjects in major 19th- and 20th-century drama.

THEA 624. Advanced Studies in Modern Drama. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3, 3 credits. Intensive, detailed studies of selected subjects in major 19th- and 20th-century drama.

THEA 630. Production. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 6 laboratory hours. 3 credits. May be repeated. The design, rehearsal, and performance of dramatic works.

THEA 640. Advanced Theatre Projects. 3,6 Hours.

Semester course; 1 or 2 lecture and 4 or 8 laboratory hours. 3 or 6 credits per semester. May be repeated. Individual or group projects in acting, directing, costume design, stage design or dramaturgy.

THEA 641. Advanced Theatre Projects. 3,6 Hours.

Semester course; 1 or 2 lecture and 4 or 8 laboratory hours. 3 or 6 credits per semester. May be repeated. Individual or group projects in acting, directing, costume design, stage design or dramaturgy.

THEA 651. Individual Study in Graduate Design. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 4 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated. Intensive individual training in design and presentation processes as they apply to contemporary professional production.

THEA 661. Graduate Direction. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Graduate-level studio course designed to introduce students to concepts involved in play direction, including play analysis, composition, blocking, style and form. Exercises and projects will reinforce elements discussed in class and include opportunities for stage work complete with peer feedback and instructor critique.

THEA 662. Graduate Direction. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Graduate-level studio course designed to introduce students to concepts involved in play direction, including play analysis, composition, blocking, style and form. Exercises and projects will reinforce elements discussed in class and include opportunities for stage work complete with peer feedback and instructor critique.

THEA 693. Colloquium and Practical Training. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 studio hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Literary, historical, and theoretical studies together with specialized voice and movement training related to dramatic works in production.

THEA 694. Theatre Pedagogy Professional Internship. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1 or 3 lecture hours. 1, 3 or 6 credits. May be repeated. Prerequisites: THEA 519 and permission of the graduate adviser in theatre. Research, design, and either implementation or thoroughly planned implementation of a curricular research and development project of relevance to a formal speech and/or theatre pedagogy program.

THEA 696. Dramaturgy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Study of the function of the dramaturge in the American theatre. Readings, research and practical exercises for production dramaturgy of classic and contemporary plays.

THEA 697. Research and Special Problems in Theatre. 1,3 Hour.

Semester course; 1 or 3 credits. May be repeated with permission of graduate adviser. Individually directed study and research under faculty supervision on approved research problems or projects in theatre.

THEA 698. Creative Project. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Provides the culminating performance or design experience in the student's degree emphasis. Adjudicated by the faculty.

THEA 699. Creative Project Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Provides the student in acting, directing, costume design, and stage design the opportunity to document and evaluate the creative project. Defended before a committee of the faculty.

THEA 791. Seminar in Special Issues in Theatre. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Additional credits may be taken with permission of the graduate directory. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. An advanced, detailed study of selected contemporary issues not included in the regular curriculum. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

THEA 799. Thesis. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1-6 credits. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Permission of the department graduate studies adviser and department chair. Preparation of a thesis based on independent research.

School of Business

Accounting (ACCT)

ACCT 507. Fundamentals of Accounting. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Theoretical and technical aspects for accumulating and reporting financial information for business. Emphasis on current financial accounting issues confronting businesses and interpretation of financial information reported by business. This is a graduate foundation course.

ACCT 513. Advanced Accounting. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ACCT 305 with a minimum grade of C. Financial accounting for complex business relationships, including business combinations, consolidated financial statements, restatement of foreign financial statements, foreign currency transactions, derivative instruments, partnership accounting and pension accounting. Emphasis is on current issues confronting accountants and financial reporting and the potential impact of these issues on business entities.

ACCT 604. Advanced Auditing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ACCT 406 with a minimum grade of C. Development of auditing theory, special disclosure issues, statistical sampling, and ethical, legal and social responsibilities of external and internal auditors. Emphasis on contemporary topics in auditing.

ACCT 606. International Accounting. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ACCT 304 with a minimum grade of C. International dimensions of accounting; national differences in accounting thought and practice; problems and issues.

ACCT 608. Managerial Accounting Concepts. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ACCT 507. The use of accounting information contained in reports to management. The functions of planning, decision making, and control are studied as accounting data are reported through the firm's information system and in special analyses.

ACCT 610. Forensic Accounting. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ACCT 406 with a minimum grade of C. Study of forensic accounting topics, including fraudulent financial reporting, employee fraud, money laundering, litigation services, evidence management, computer forensics and business valuation.

ACCT 662. Advanced Topics in Accounting Information Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ACCT 307 with a minimum grade of C. Study of accounting systems, concepts and applications with reference to actual problems encountered in the analysis, design, implementation, use, audit and evaluation of accounting systems in a computer environment.

ACCT 680. Tax Research and Planning. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ACCT 405 with a minimum grade of C. Tax research methodology; the sources of tax law and their relationship to tax research.

ACCT 681. Tax Administration. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ACCT 405 with a minimum grade of C. The Internal Revenue Service and the practices and procedures involved and/or available for the settlement of tax controversies and common elections of accounting methods.

ACCT 682. Corporate Taxation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ACCT 405 with a minimum grade of C. Corporate tax laws as related to the corporations involved and to individual shareholders; tax aspects of the creation, operation, reorganization, and partial liquidation of corporations; corporate distributions.

ACCT 684. Partnership Taxation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ACCT 405 with a minimum grade of C. Tax problems related to organization, operation, and liquidation of a partnership. Also, tax problems of Subchapter S corporations, tax-exempt organizations, private foundations and other special corporate forms.

ACCT 697. Guided Study in Accounting. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hours. 1 credit. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed work is required by Graduate Studies office in the School of Business. This course is restricted to accounting majors. The primary purpose of this course is to allow international students to take advantage of an internship work experience. This course may also be used by accounting graduate students to do research on problems in accounting. Students will be assigned reading and will prepare a written report. Graded as pass/fail.

ACCT 790. Research Methods Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Open only to Ph.D. students in business. Analyzes and critiques general theories, practices and functions in a specialized area of accounting research.

ACCT 791. Managerial Accounting Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Open only to Ph.D. students in business. Presents contemporary issues in managerial accounting and auditing research.

ACCT 792. Financial Accounting Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Open only to Ph.D. students in business. Presents and analyzes contemporary issues in financial accounting.

ACCT 793. International Accounting Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Open only to Ph.D. students in business. Presents contemporary issues and research in international accounting.

ACCT 794. Behavioral Research Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Open only to Ph.D. students in business. Provides knowledge and skills for advanced accounting research.

ACCT 795. Auditing Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Open only to Ph.D. students in business. Presents contemporary issues in auditing research.

ACCT 797. Guided Study in Accounting. 6 Hours.

Year course; 6 credits. Graduate students will work under supervision in outlining a graduate thesis and in carrying out the thesis.

ACCT 898. Dissertation Research. 1-12 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours.1-12 credits. Enrollment restricted to Ph.D. in Business students.

Brandcenter (BRND)

BRND 602. Introduction to Account Planning. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Building student understanding of the foundational principles of account/strategic planning practiced in advertising agencies. Focus will be on immersion into a range of consumer research tools and application of learning in the creative brief development and communication planning process.

BRND 608. Accounting for Communication Professionals. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students. Course goal is to equip nonfinancial advertising students with the basic concepts of accounting and to apply their understanding of these principles to specific managerial situations within the advertising agency, brand management and marketing department environments. Students will also develop a framework for analyzing media results, ROI and various market/brand plan outcomes.

BRND 609. Information Architecture. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Designing and building information in the new media space. Students learn the power of user interaction, efficient usability and digital ergonomics. Information architecture is the effective coordination and selection of information -- what you leave out is as important as what you leave in. Students will be familiar with tracking data and site analytics for the best brand experience. Truly good design work always looks to break new ground or tries to explore new territory; this course is no exception.

BRND 620. Brand Design for Brand Managers. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Building student understanding of the role of design in its various forms within the marketing mix. Focused on design theory and covers all aspects of design and platforms and how consumers perceive brand essence.

BRND 621. Strategy and Design. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Building students’ understanding of the role of strategists and experience designers working as a team.

BRND 622. Visual Storytelling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The goal of this class is to take a story and translate it successfully to the screen. Class will include lectures and technology sessions. Classes will be be divided between discussions about existing films and spots, and classes devoted to learning the use of lights, cameras and software editing. Three short films will be produced.

BRND 623. Physical Computing I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Conceptualizing projects with brands in mind and creating prototypes and making sure the final output fits the brand it is paired with. This class will yield actual working prototypes that can help get across the function and look to a design/engineering team to create a production model.

BRND 624. Physical Computing II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BRND 623. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Dives deeper and builds off the content learned in the prerequisite course.

BRND 625. Comms Planning and UX. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. This class will instruct students on traditional tools such as Simmons, add in new media channel tools such as Sysomos and give students a foundation on the skill set of comms planning and the incorporation of UX attributes into their strategic work.

BRND 627. Visual Storytelling and Design for Strategists. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. The goal of this class is to take a story and translate it successfully to the screen. Class is geared to strategy students. Basic production techniques will be taught. By the end of the semester, students will be able to write, produce, shoot and edit a variety of commercial and viral video pieces. Short films will be produced. In order to bring this visual sensibility to all their work, strategists will be taught key design software that will enable them to improve the communication value of their written and presentation work.

BRND 629. Strategic Thinking. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Contrasting historically rigid ways of approaching problems to newer, more dynamic approaches will prepare students to professionally engage a constantly shifting world of business, consumer, political and economic forces. Students will engage in semester-long projects to develop new ways of thinking strategically, including writing a strategic plan and scenario plans (the art of looking ahead and envisioning various realities for a company). Students will work directly with local small business owners in developing and formally presenting relevant strategies.

BRND 630. Problem Solving for Art Directors. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Explores the media of print, Internet and television to develop and understand the basis of good design and art direction. Will work through the process of visual concepts and execution.

BRND 631. Craft. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only or by permission of instructor. Explores the delivery of concepts to an audience to determine how the message is received. Will teach how to attack a problem, how to work through a creative block and how to be a better judge of your own work.

BRND 632. Foundations of Brand Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Provides students with an overview of the major tasks facing today's product/brand managers, including analyzing the market, developing objectives and strategies for products and services, and making decisions about price, promotion, distribution channels, customer service and advertising. Uses the product/marketing plan as the unifying framework and, via a heavy concentration on case study, takes a "hands-on" approach toward preparing students to assume positions in brand management.

BRND 633. User Participation Platforms. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Harness the power of Web users by designing within the architecture of user participation. Branding is no longer a one-way communication model. This course focuses on understanding and managing the communications from consumers to other consumers via the Web. Students will learn to cultivate organic growth and orchestrate grassroots efforts, as well as explore considerations in physical computing and augmentation of technology within someone's reality.

BRND 635. Creating Gravitational Pull. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Driving traffic to websites. Includes search engine optimization and search engine marketing, but goes way beyond. Designing integrated brand campaigns linking different channels and media types to take consumers on a journey with different touch points, channels and devices. Students will use proven strategies and design campaigns to have a live website and pull visitors to it. Students are expected to demonstrate their abilities on live sites where the effectiveness of their efforts is realized in real-time results.

BRND 638. Brand Engagement. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only or by permission of instructor. Enhancing consumers’ brand experience. Students explore interactive ways to engage consumers. Core aspects of the future of the Web are explored. Students will be familiar with current engagement techniques, and they will create new ways to connect with consumers. Emphasis on the creation of ideas of sufficient scope as to become the basis for ad campaigns covering many platforms, especially including the Web.

BRND 639. Cultural Impact: Advanced Account Planning. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only or by permission of instructor. Identify a cultural issue that can impact business results and formulate a hypothesis for investigating the issue. Students gain experience in identifying a research need, in developing a research plan and methodology and in fielding the plan. After research, students get experience determining what they have learned and knowing what it means to the client.

BRND 640. Problem Solving. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only or by permission of instructor. Focuses on developing ability to create well-written, creatively focused advertising copy that solves communications problems. Addresses headline and body copy issues through presentation of students' work and research on major copywriters and their work.

BRND 647. Insights and Implications: Applied Strategic Planning. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only or by permission of instructor. Learn to formulate insights, to understand implications from the insights and to form conclusions that help to build a brand. This course is the natural follow-up to BRND 639. The emphasis shifts slightly from team-based projects to more individual, thesis-like projects. Students demonstrate that they have evolved from researchers and fact finders to strategists who can turn data into valuable information.

BRND 648. Innovation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only or by permission of instructor. This course will challenge students to learn the techniques of innovators in business and the community. The course combines lectures and instruction with a semester-long innovation competition in partnership with global brands. Both invention and execution will be explored.

BRND 649. Brand Analytics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Learning and applying statistical methodologies for analytics in order to make smart decisions for effective brand management. Techniques for decision-making are explored along with Web analytics, performance metrics and ROI.

BRND 651. Creative Thinking. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Focuses on developing the creative skills necessary for solving advertising communication problems. Enables students to maximize and strengthen creative abilities through lecture, brainstorming sessions, and team-oriented strategy sessions focusing on real case projects.

BRND 652. Concept Development. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BRND 651. Develops students' ability to create visually effective work that targets specific groups of consumers through ongoing review and discussion sessions designed to pinpoint strategies and create relevant visually oriented ideas quickly. Emphasizes a teamwork approach to art direction and concept development.

BRND 653. Portfolio Development. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BRND 652. Focuses student toward creative solutions to communication problems. Addresses specific strategies including briefs and concept work that require extensive copy. Emphasizes a team approach to copywriting and art direction.

BRND 659. Brand Experiences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Provides thorough coverage for designing comprehensive brand communications for real-world clients that involve physical experiences for consumers. Projects will force students to think about every aspect of the consumer experience including store appearance, product selection, employee behavior and the purchasing process. An emphasis will be placed on producing comprehensive campaigns that develop strategic and creative brand experiences for customers.

BRND 662. Research Methodologies. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only or by permission of instructor. Review a variety of qualitative and quantitative research techniques as well as an introduction to writing creative briefs. Students will learn how to translate research into insightful creative and business platforms. This is a practical course that prepares students to be senior-level strategic thinkers throughout their careers.

BRND 663. Team Building and Leadership for Brand Managers. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Course will be focused on equipping future brand managers with a managerial “toolkit” comprised of practical management and leadership techniques appropriate to the unique managerial requirements of the brand management discipline. Techniques will include topics such as facilitating interdisciplinary collaboration, strategic organizational structure, managing change and crisis management among others.

BRND 664. Persuasion. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only or by permission of instructor. This course offers an intensive in skills necessary to persuade when presenting work and ideas. Topics such as voice delivery, personal style, effective presentation of creative work, storytelling and capturing audience attention will be covered. Student presentations will be critiqued and videotaped for analysis.

BRND 667. Applied Brand Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Exposes students to detailed, practical information about the tools and tactics used to apply inventive brand strategies. Students will be exposed to managerial functions involving marketing and project management, while being challenged to synthesize and simplify complex information in order to create actionable plans. A portion of the course is dedicated to the use of a simulation case, "Pharmasim," which allows students to test theories and get real-time feedback on the likely results of their decisions.

BRND 668. Advanced Brand Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Involves intensive, interactive exploration of factors that affect the success of brands. Students study brand delivery systems from product and packaging design through sales channels to the ultimate consumer. The curriculum combines individual casework and team assignments to ground students in the art and science of strategy development. Students are also exposed to guest lecturers with brand management and integrated marketing expertise. Since brand managers must direct and manage the efforts of colleagues and agencies not under their control, there is a concentration on developing forceful, persuasive communication skills.

BRND 670. Creative Fusion. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Integrating new branding methods with traditional approaches (like advertising, public relations and direct marketing) to develop powerful, coordinated and synergistic campaigns.

BRND 673. Experimentation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Creative tracks working together in teams to create shifts in established paradigm and executing a prototype of these solutions.

BRND 677. The Business of Branding. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Requires students to develop ideas ranging from strategic to tactical and from rational to emotional. Students will be called on to develop and examine ideas that differentiate brands, build sales and affect market share. The new business process will be considered and successful presentation techniques will be evaluated. Ethical considerations faced by industry practitioners will be explored.

BRND 690. Supervised Business Study. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 6 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Working under close faculty supervision, students partner with local, real-life organizations to develop brand strategies. Students take responsibility for their learning of applied brand management. Each student is responsible for securing approval from the organization involved and for submitting a proposal to the faculty at the start of the semester. Work is centered on a specific brand challenge currently being faced by the organization. Examples may include a product launch, the reposition of an existing brand, the extension of a product line or the re-energizing of a declining brand.

BRND 695. Internship: Brandcenter. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 credit. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Selected students will receive on-the-job training under the supervision of the instructor and employer. Internships are available in a variety of branding opportunities.

BRND 696. Advanced Portfolio. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to Brandcenter students only. Continues the development and demonstration of conceptual and creative abilities and insights in a variety of areas sought by agency art directors, copywriters and recruiters. Individual development of concepts and materials necessary for the creation of mini-books and portfolios under one-on-one instruction. Independent projects pursued specifically for individual portfolio development.

Business (BUSN)

BUSN 601. Studies in Contemporary Business Issues: ____. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour; content delivered online. 1 credit. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Enrollment restricted to students in the online MBA program. Course provides advanced study and analysis of contemporary business issues.

BUSN 610. On-campus Residency. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. May be repeated for a maximum of three credits. Enrollment restricted to students in the online MBA program. MBA faculty will lead this two-day residency immersion session offering activities such as seminars, case and/or simulation assignments, and meetings with business and thought leaders to enhance team-building, leadership and professional development skills. Students will be evaluated on face-to-face presentation skills, group interaction and career development plans. Graded as pass/fail.

BUSN 700. Principles of Scientific Inquiry in Business. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A seminar on the philosophical and epistemological foundations of scientific inquiry as they relate to research in business and its allied disciplines. The focus will be on the underlying logic, elements, reach and limits of alternative frameworks, such as positivism, empiricism and Bayesean analysis, and the conditions under which each is the preferred method of inquiry.

BUSN 701. Research Methods in Business. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: admission to Ph.D. program and permission of instructor. A seminar on the design of research in business, including the philosophy of science, theory development and the design of research capable of testing hypotheses, analytic levels, measurement theory and methods, and research design alternatives.

BUSN 702. Research Analysis in Business. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 524 or equivalent and acceptance into the doctoral program. Study of the scientific method as currently applied in business and organizational research, with emphasis on the conduct of studies, data analysis and presentation of empirically based knowledge.

Computer and Information Systems Security (CISS)

CISS 609. Advanced Computational Intelligence. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: an undergraduate course in artificial intelligence, or equivalent background with permission of instructor. Exploration of issues related to application of computational intelligence techniques to system security, particularly in the detection of anomalous system behavior. Of particular interest are issues associated with the automated detection of anomalies caused by authorized users through intended malicious behavior or through accidental misuse, and issues associated with automated user authentication. Crosslisted as: CMSC 609.

CISS 616. Data Warehousing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO 610. Covers important concepts and techniques in the design and implementation of a data warehouse. Topics include the data warehouse architecture, the logical and physical design issues in the data warehousing development process, technical factors (i.e., hardware, client/server technology, data warehousing and DBMS technologies) and implementation considerations (i.e., data extraction, clean-up and transformation tools). Introduces online analytical processing and data mining. Crosslisted as: INFO 616.

CISS 618. Database and Application Security. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Theory and practice of database and software security focusing in particular on some common database software security risks and on the identification of potential threats and vulnerabilities. Crosslisted as: CMSC 618.

CISS 622. Network and Operating Systems Security. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CISS 624. Studies the principles of network security and secure operating systems. Included are topics relating to the use of intrusion detection, intrusion prevention and other related tools. Crosslisted as: CMSC 622.

CISS 624. Applied Cryptography. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides a comprehensive survey of modern cryptography. Included are techniques of enciphering and deciphering messages using cryptographic algorithms, block ciphers and block cipher modes, hash functions and message authentication codes, public key cryptography and digital signatures, and steganography. Crosslisted as: CMSC 620.

CISS 634. Ethical, Social and Legal Issues in Computer and Information Systems Security. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Analyzing socio-political and ethical issues surrounding computer and information systems security. Topics include privacy laws, identity theft, information collection and retention policies, and enforcement.

CISS 644. Principles of Computer and Information Systems Security. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO 640 or INFO 661. Explores issues related to protecting information resources of a firm. Various tools and techniques useful for assessing CISS security concerns in organizations are introduced. Principles and models for CISS security and security management are presented and selected computer and CISS security topics are introduced. Material is presented and discussed from a management frame of reference. Crosslisted as: INFO 644.

CISS 646. Computer and Information Systems Access Control. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Detailed discussion of access control, including administration, identification and authentication techniques, methodologies and implementations, methods of attack, monitoring, and penetration testing.

CISS 654. Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery Planning. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Fundamentals of business continuity and disaster recovery planning. Includes risk assessment, physical facility protection, data recovery planning, strategies for network backup, desktop recovery, emergency decision making, and maintenance and testing of the plan and its components.

CISS 693. Practice of Computer and Information Systems Security. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Students will undertake practical research projects. Written reports of the investigations are required. This course is intended to be taken at the end of the program.

CISS 697. Guided Study. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits. Intended for graduate students in the Computer and Information Systems Security program wishing to do research on problems in computer and information systems security. Approval of proposed work is required by the director of graduate programs of the Department of Information Systems or of the Department of Computer Science no later than the 10th week of the prior semester. Each student will work with an appropriate faculty member on an approved research proposal. The student will submit a written report on the research conducted as the final product for the course. This course is intended to be taken near the end of the student’s degree program.

Decision Analytics (DAPT)

DAPT 611. Analysis and Design of Database Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Focuses on relational databases for structured data and includes entity relational diagram and extended entity relational diagram and transformation of ERD and EERD into relational schema. The course will give students competence in SQL and other search techniques, data validation and data cleansing.

DAPT 612. Text Mining and Unstructured Data. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Focuses on unstructured data and includes the topics: creation of XML documents, creating/validating ontology; identifying terms and their relationships and converting them into an ontology using an ontology editor such as Protégé; object-oriented programs; extracting keywords and key phrases; term similarity measure and term frequency.

DAPT 613. Tools for Business Intelligence. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Provides students with techniques and practices for modern decision-making in support of business/corporate performance. Includes hands-on experience with various information analysis, business intelligence and decision-support techniques and tools with applications to various business-problem scenarios, such as portfolio analysis, project selection, market research and supply-chain optimization.

DAPT 614. Advanced SQL. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Prerequisite: DAPT 611. This course is designed to prepare students for multiple table queries using structured query language and will provide advanced training in the application of SQL to real data problems.

DAPT 615. Emerging Technologies. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour.1 credit. The course emphasizes the study of a variety of big data technologies to gain insight that will be used to get people throughout the enterprise to run the business more effectively and to provide better service to customers. The course focuses on big data solutions that are processed in a platform that can handle the variety, velocity and volume of data by using a family of components that require integration and data governance.

DAPT 621. Statistics for the World of Big Data. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Covers single variable and multivariable statistical techniques using commercial computer packages such as SAS and SPSS. Students will learn when different techniques are warranted, conceptually how techniques function, how to perform the analysis using commercial computer packages and how to interpret the program outputs.

DAPT 622. Statistics for the World of Big Data II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: DAPT 621. Continues an emphasis on data visualization and statistical modeling for different types of variables, including relationships between multivariable variables.

DAPT 631. Data Mining. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Data mining is the extraction of implicit, previously unknown and potentially useful information from data. Data mining tasks include classification and regression (pattern recognition), cluster analysis, association analysis, and anomaly detection. This class will introduce methods for each of these tasks, their implementation in relevant software and the interpretation of data mining results.

DAPT 632. Forecasting Methods and Applications for Managerial Decision-making. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Methods covered include moving average and exponential smoothing, seasonal adjustments, time-series, and forecast averaging. Particular emphasis on developing and implementing forecasting systems in an interactive organization and appreciation of issues and caveats.

DAPT 633. Introduction to Marketing and Customer Analytics. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Examines how firms make use of analytic tools to target advertising, improve customer response and service, and improve financial performance. The course will apply quantitative tools students have already seen (statistical analysis, simulation and regression analysis) to marketing and customer-response decisions.

DAPT 641. Introduction to Simulation Methods. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. An introduction to the application and theoretical background of simulation. Topics include Monte Carlo simulation and modeling systems using discrete event simulation. Theoretical topics include random variable generation, model verification and validation, statistical analysis of output, and decision-making via simulation. A high-level simulation language will be utilized.

DAPT 642. Introduction to Risk Analysis. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Presents a formal methodology for prescriptive decision-making under risk and uncertainty. Decision analysis applies to hard problems involving sequential decisions, major uncertainties, significant outcomes and complex values. The course includes building and solving influence diagrams and decision trees; modeling uncertainty with subjective probabilities; the value of information; and modeling risk preferences with utility functions. Decision and risk analysis applications in business and government are considered.

DAPT 643. Introduction to Optimization Models. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Mathematical optimization is used to support quantitative and logical decision-making by providing a prescription of choices that minimize cost or maximize profit. This class provides an introduction to using optimization tools to model, solve and interpret results of real-world decision problems. Examples of applications include loan allocation, workforce scheduling, multi-period financial models and portfolio optimization.

DAPT 651. Personal, Interpersonal and Organizational Awareness. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. This is an application-based course involving the understanding and application of communicating information in the personal, interpersonal/team and organizational setting. The focus is on barriers to communication, personal and audience awareness, listening skills, nonverbal communication behaviors, team-building and meetings management. A variety of practica and simulations will be used during this course.

DAPT 652. Professional Presentations: Strategy, Delivery and Technology. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. This is an application-based course involving the audience-centered design and application of effective oral presentations. The focus will be on the development and enhancement of public presentation skills in different types of formal and informal public situations. Further ability in appropriate presentation technology will be provided and assessment will be behavior-driven. A variety of practica and simulations will be used during this course.

DAPT 653. Written Communications: Strategy, Structure and Connection. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. This is an application-based course involving the audience-centered design and application of effective written communications. The focus will be on the development and enhancement of writing and English skills for different types of organization-required documents, including email, proposals, executive summaries, letters and formal reports. Further assessment in grammar and syntax will be provided through online and faculty feedback. A variety of practicum and simulations will be used during this course.

DAPT 654. Written Communications: Strategy, Structure and Connection II. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Continues topics and lessons from DAPT 653.

DAPT 661. Issues and Analytics. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. May be repeated for a total of three credits. Academic, business, government and NGO leaders discuss current issues and applications of analytics. Analytics is a dynamically changing and evolving field. Students will have an opportunity to discuss current issues directly with people on the front lines.

DAPT 670. Analytics Problem Formation. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. An introduction to problem formulation and the decision-making process that must precede the application of analytics. Topics include objectives generation, structuring objectives, decision diagrams for risk and uncertainty modeling, and qualitative approaches to decisions under risk and value tradeoffs.

DAPT 681. Analytics Practicum I. 1 Hour.

Sponsored project. 1 credit. This course will allow students to apply the concepts, theories and skills learned in other courses to a real analytics project from a sponsoring organization. Teams of students will formulate a problem based on discussions with management of the sponsoring organization; query the sponsor’s and/or public databases for appropriate data; perform required statistical analysis; and present results in both a written report and oral presentation to sponsoring management.

DAPT 682. Analytics Practicum II. 2 Hours.

Semester course; sponsored project. 2 credits. Continues project from DAPT 682.

Economics (ECON)

ECON 500. Concepts in Economics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Essential economic concepts including the price system, price determination in imperfectly competitive markets, employment theory, and monetary theory. This is a foundation course. Not open to students who have completed undergraduate foundation sequence: ECON 203 with a minimum grade of B and ECON 211, or ECON 210 and 211.

ECON 501. Introduction to Econometrics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON 500, 210 or 203, the latter with a minimum grade of B; and MGMT 301, STAT 210 or STAT 212. Sources and uses of economic data; includes the application of statistical methods and regression analysis to time series and cross-section data to test hypotheses of micro- and macroeconomics.

ECON 600. Fundamental Economic Analyses of Business Decisions. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Designed to provide the non-business major with knowledge of fundamental economic principles and their application to business decisions and organization. Topics include supply of demand, elasticity, price determination by a firm with market power, optimal levels of employment, incentives and compensation, and multidivisional organization.

ECON 604. Advanced Microeconomic Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON 614. Theory of prices and markets; value and distribution. Partial and general equilibrium analysis.

ECON 607. Advanced Macroeconomic Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON 614. National income analysis, monetary and fiscal theory and policy, and general equilibrium analysis.

ECON 609. Advanced International Economics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON 203 with a minimum B grade and ECON 211; or ECON 210 and ECON 211. An advanced-level examination of why trade occurs, balance of payments concept and adjustment, international equilibrium, forward exchange, markets, international investment, and international organizations.

ECON 610. Managerial Economics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON 203 with a minimum B grade and ECON 211; or ECON 210 and ECON 211. M.B.A. students must take in conjunction with MGMT 641 or by permission of assistant dean of master's programs. Analysis of business decisions, applying tools of economic theory. Decisions on demand, production, cost, prices, profits and investments.

ECON 612. Econometrics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON 501. Provides empirical content to the theoretical concepts of the economics by formulating and estimating models. Introduction to simultaneous equation problems in economics and the studies of production, demand, and consumption functions.

ECON 614. Mathematical Economics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON 203 with a minimum B grade and ECON 211; or ECON 210 and ECON 211. Economic analysis utilizing simple mathematical methods. Includes derivation and exposition of theories and the application of tools to widen the scope and increase the usefulness of economics.

ECON 616. Advanced Public Finance. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON 203 with a minimum B grade and ECON 211; or ECON 210 and ECON 211. Theory and application of public finance, including taxation, expenditures, and budgeting. Special attention to cost-benefit analysis and to intergovernmental relations in federal system.

ECON 617. Financial Markets. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON 501, MGMT 524, STAT 541, or MGMT 302; and ECON 500 or FIRE 520. Theories of markets for loanable funds are related to empirical findings and institutional structures. Yields of financial assets, kinds of debt instruments, financial institutions, public policy, financial models, and the role of money and credit in economic growth are considered.

ECON 620. The Economics of Industry. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON 301, ECON 303 or ECON 610. The application of economic analysis to the structure, conduct, and performance of industry; public regulation and policies to promote workable competition.

ECON 621. Topics in Economics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON 500; or ECON 203 with a minimum grade of B and ECON 210; or ECON 210 and 211. Study of specialized topic(s) in economics.

ECON 623. Anomalies in Financial Economics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON 617 and ECON 401. Considers anomalies, or evidence that is inconsistent with or difficult to explain using received theory in economics. Studying anomalies is useful both to develop a better, subtler understanding of received theory and to recognize how the theory may be refined or changed to resolve the anomalies. Anomalies considered include the equity premium puzzle, excess-volatility, over-reaction and under-reaction of asset prices, and asset allocation puzzles. In some cases a proposed anomaly can be explained by more careful treatment of the problem. In other cases, new theories (e.g., noise-trader models) are put forward to explain anomalies.

ECON 624. Health Economics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON 203 with a minimum grade of B and ECON 211. Develops an understanding of (1) economics as a managerial tool in making choices or decisions that will provide for an optimum allocation of limited health care resources and (2) economics as a way of thinking about and approaching issues of public policy in financing and organizing health and medical services. Individual research on crucial or controversial issues in the health care field. Crosslisted as: HADM 624.

ECON 631. Labor Market Theory and Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON 203 with a minimum B grade and ECON 211. Theoretical and empirical analysis of labor markets from both an economics and a management or human resource perspective. Topics will include employment concerns, wage structure and compensation packages.

ECON 641. Econometric Time-series Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON 501 and ECON 614. Provides the analytical and programming tools needed to adeptly handle the statistical analyses of econometric time-series data. Topics include: stationarity, unit-roots, univariate time-series models, vector autoregressions and co-integration. These tools will be used to analyze movements in interest rates, exchange rates and equity markets as well as the transmission of monetary policy actions.

ECON 642. Panel and Nonlinear Methods in Econometrics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON 612. Includes panel data analysis (fixed and random effects); identification and estimation of nonlinear models, limited dependent variable models (probit, logit, tobit, etc.), duration models; and hypothesis/specification tests. The techniques discussed in class will be used to analyze a variety of empirical questions. The course has an applications rather than a theoretical focus.

ECON 682. An Economic Approach to Environmental Issues. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON 203 with a minimum B grade and ECON 211. The effect of externalities in terms of efficiency and equity considerations. The role and problems of benefit-cost analysis in decision making is developed. The interrelationship of air, water, and land quality issues is analyzed. The use rate of natural resources, energy consumption, and the steady-state economy and their impacts are evaluated.

ECON 691. Topics in Economics. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1, 2 or 3 credits. Study of current topics. Topics may vary from semester to semester.

ECON 693. Field Project in Economics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed work is required by graduate studies office in the School of Business. Students will work under the supervision of a faculty adviser in planning and carrying out a practical research project. A written report of the investigations is required. To be taken at the end of the program.

ECON 697. Guided Study in Economics. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 1, 2 or 3 credits. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed work is required by graduate studies office in the School of Business. Graduate students wishing to do research on problems in business administration or business education will submit a detailed outline of their problem. They will be assigned reading and will prepare a written report on the problem. To be taken at the end of the program.

ECON 798. Thesis in Economics. 3 Hours.

Year course; 6 credits. Prerequisite: approval of the proposed work is required by the graduate adviser and the proposed thesis adviser. Graduate students will work under supervision in outlining a graduate thesis and in carrying out the thesis.

ECON 799. Thesis in Economics. 3 Hours.

Year course; 6 credits. Prerequisite: approval of the proposed work is required by the graduate adviser and the proposed thesis adviser. Graduate students will work under supervision in outlining a graduate thesis and in carrying out the thesis.

Fast Track Information Systems (ISTM)

ISTM 671. Organizational Culture and Team Building. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides students an understanding of the impact information technology has made in defining an organization's culture and the processes that are used to support operational and strategic decision making. Groupware tools are used to simulate how organizations use computer-based collaboration software for sharing information, ideas and knowledge designed for improved productivity and decision making in order to enhance the organization's competitiveness strategically. Topics include: organizational culture and team building in the age of new business models, virtual work environments, privacy, telecommuting, monitoring Internet access and content, and communication etiquette, electronic teleconferencing, video, data and web conferencing.

ISTM 672. Information Systems Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines the information requirements of an organization. The difference in the kinds of information needed at operational, administrative, strategic and organizational levels are emphasized. Planning and implementing a comprehensive information system and methods to measure its effectiveness are discussed. Topics include Capability Maturity Models, managerial support systems and information resources planning.

ISTM 673. Analysis and Decisions. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Focuses on the analysis and decisions required for selecting new systems or technology. Specifically, the course covers business requirements analysis, system life-cycle models, Unified Process and other system development methodologies, structural and behavioral system models, CASE tools, decision analysis for vendor and technology selection, feasibility and risk analysis, and implementation and transition management.

ISTM 674. Emerging Technologies. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Designed to identify emerging computer hardware, software and communication/network technologies that impact the design and implementation of new information systems. Topics will address emerging technologies that are changing data storage, modes of information processing and media for dissemination. Managerial challenges and issues, including new and existing technology compatibility, the return on new technology investments, and strategies for assessing and mitigating an organization's risk exposure are examined.

ISTM 675. IS Planning and Project Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides a basic framework for understanding IT project management, building on the skills needed to manage projects of all sizes. Topics include the project life cycle, project team, project selection, project organization, project planning, negotiation and conflict resolution, and resource management. The responsibility and authority of a program manager and the integration of program functions in a complex organizational structure will be addressed. Through a combination of simulation activities with formal presentations and experiential learning, the following concepts will be addressed: definition of budgets, allocation of resources, consideration of ROI, earned value, management consideration of metrics accumulation and assessment, and control of scope creep.

ISTM 676. Information Systems Assurance and Security Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides a fresh look at managing and protecting the information resources of a firm. While identifying issues, concerns and problems, the course takes students through various tools and techniques that are useful in interpreting information systems security concerns in organizations. In a final synthesis, principles and models are presented that help in proactively managing IS security.

ISTM 677. Structuring Information for Decision Making. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Presents an overview of information systems methods that are used to structure information for decision making. Following a review of the basics of data management, the course examines various database management systems. The course then continues with an investigation of data warehousing, data mining, XML, knowledge management and business intelligence. Students successfully completing the course will understand the range of potential data management options used to present information for decision making and their various strengths and weaknesses.

ISTM 678. IS in the Digital Economy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Expounds on the innovative nature of the confluence of the Web and business. The notion of disruptive technologies is introduced and discussed. Further, the means by which the relative success and failure of IS in the digital economy can be assessed/measured are deliberated. A number of emergent issues related to the digital economy (viz. eTrust, eCRM, social responsibility, etc.) are discussed.

ISTM 679. Enterprise Information Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Over the past decade, organizations have been relying more and more on enterprise-wide deployment of software applications (ERP) to solve their integration problems. This course begins by describing the true size and magnitude of the enterprise integration challenge, then it examines the general form of problem solution offered by these ERP packages. Since implementation of ERPs continues to be a major challenge, the course fully examines both the track record and successful approaches to enterprise information systems implementation. Finally, new developments in this area are explored.

ISTM 691. Topics in IT Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Study of current topics. Topics may vary from semester to semester.

Fast Track MBA (FMBA)

FMBA 601. Team Building and Leadership. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Presents how organizations steer members toward what needs doing. Design, functions and creation of teams, engaging leadership and motivation processes to set and achieve organizational goals; management of emerging communication and evaluation processes; interacting with boards and with customers are developed across disciplines.

FMBA 602. Team Building and Leadership. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Presents how organizations steer members toward what needs doing. Design, functions and creation of teams, engaging leadership and motivation processes to set and achieve organizational goals; management of emerging communication and evaluation processes; interacting with boards and with customers are developed across disciplines.

FMBA 603. Business Foundations. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Presents how to build a foundation in business quantitative techniques. Concepts of accounting/financial reporting, quality, finance concepts, control and hypothesis testing are developed and integrated across disciplines.

FMBA 604. Analysis and Decisions. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Presents how organizations define and choose. Concepts and tools of problem-solving for administrative decisions; concepts and tools of measurement, planning and control; management of conflict, cooperation, negotiation and implementation are developed and integrated across disciplines.

FMBA 605. Analysis and Decisions. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Presents how organizations define and choose. Concepts and tools of problem-solving for administrative decisions; concepts and tools of measurement, planning and control; management of conflict, cooperation, negotiation and implementation are developed and integrated across disciplines.

FMBA 606. Analysis and Decisions. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1-6 lecture hours. 1-6 credits. Presents how organizations define and choose. Concepts and tools of problem solving for administrative decisions; concepts and tools of measurement, planning, and control; management of conflict, cooperation, negotiation, and implementation are developed and integrated across disciplines.

FMBA 607. Global Challenges. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 credits. Presents an educational tour for direct experience of influences and perspectives: France, Great Britain, Indonesia or Mexico.

FMBA 608. Organizational Culture. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Presents how organizations develop and operate. Concepts of information technology-adding values, environmental regulations/law, entrepreneurial culture, probability market orientation and management functions are explored.

FMBA 609. Productivity and Innovation. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Presents how organizations change and improve. Management of creativity, critical thinking and rewards; development of resources; implementing concepts of quality, effectiveness and change are developed across disciplines.

FMBA 610. Productivity and Innovation. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Presents how organizations change and improve. Management of creativity, critical thinking and rewards; development of resources; implementing concepts of quality, effectiveness and change are developed across disciplines.

FMBA 611. Strategic Management. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Presents how organizations define, plan and accomplish missions. Comprehensive integration of business functions and processes; systems thinking, managing shareholder value; anticipating and interacting with changing internal and external environments; formulation and implementation of strategy and integrated across disciplines.

FMBA 612. Strategic Management. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Presents how organizations define, plan and accomplish missions. Comprehensive integration of business functions and processes; systems thinking, managing shareholder value; anticipating and interacting with changing internal and external environments; formulation and implementation of strategy and integrated across disciplines.

FMBA 613. Strategic Management. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Presents how organizations define, plan and accomplish missions. Comprehensive integration of business functions and processes; systems thinking, managing shareholder value; anticipating and interacting with changing internal and external environments; formulation and implementation of strategy and integrated across disciplines.

FMBA 614. Health Care Management I: National Perspective. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Students develop an understanding of how health care evolved in the United States and articulate major policy issues. Course emphasizes the major components of health care reform and what policy issues they are intended to address. Focus is on how information technology supports quality of care, the business of health care and health care reform.

FMBA 615. Health Care Management II: Employer's Perspective. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Students will develop an understanding of the business and financing of health care. Course emphasizes the design of insurance costs, the associated costs and employer options. Also explores how wellness affects population health and health care costs.

FMBA 616. Health Care Management III: Industry Perspective. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Students will develop an understanding of the unique economic issues of health care, the importance of process improvement and compliance for health care organizations and the effect of costs. Course focuses on the roles of innovation and marketing in the health care industry.

Finance, Insurance and Real Estate (FIRE)

FIRE 520. Financial Concepts of Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Pre- or corequisites: MGMT 524, STAT/BIOS 543, STAT 541, or MGMT 301 and MGMT 302. Not open to students who have completed FIRE 311 or the equivalent. A study of the essential concepts of financial management in a global environment, including working capital management, capital budgeting, capital structure planning and dividend policy. This is a foundation course.

FIRE 533. Insurance Education Institute for High School Teachers. 3 Hours.

3 credits. This is a summer course designed for high school teachers in such fields as business, marketing, economics, mathematics, social sciences, history, life skills, home economics, or other disciplines in which the subject of risk and insurance can be incorporated into the curriculum. Teachers will learn about risk management, life, health, auto, homeowners insurance and financial planning. They will receive instructional materials and guidance to develop lesson plans for their use in teaching the subject to their students.

FIRE 620. Introduction to Financial Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of essential concepts of financial management in a global environment, including time value, capital budgeting and valuation, cost of capital structure, divided policy, and working capital management, at a level appropriate to the Master of Management program.

FIRE 621. Cases in Financial Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: FIRE 623. Analysis, in a global environment, of financial problems and policies of nonfinancial firms, including capital management, capital rationing and cost of capital, and capital structure.

FIRE 622. Financial Management of Financial Institutions. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: FIRE 520. Understanding the application of concepts relevant to the financial management of financial institutions in a global environment.

FIRE 623. Financial Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: FIRE 520. Analyzes the theory and practice of corporate finance. Detailed investigation of the investment and financing decision of the firm in an environment of uncertainty.

FIRE 625. Group Insurance and Pension Planning. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: FIRE 520 and MGMT 530. Analysis of major elements of employee benefit plans including: life, health and disability benefits, pension, and profit-sharing plans. Design principles, financing, legal and tax considerations are examined. Major issues and new developments. Courses directly related to risk, insurance and employee benefits are approved for Virginia Insurance Continuing Education. Forty-two credits for insurance agents. Contact the director of insurance studies for further information.

FIRE 626. Risk Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: FIRE 623 or FIRE 635. Property and liability risks faced by businesses and public institutions are studied. Insurance and alternative methods of controlling and financing these risks are analyzed and compared. Courses directly related to risk, insurance and employee benefits are approved for Virginia Insurance Continuing Education. Forty-two credits for insurance agents. Contact the director of insurance studies for further information.

FIRE 627. Real Estate Development. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the development process; including market analysis, site selection, pre-acquisition strategic planning, and project management.

FIRE 628. Using GIS in Real Estate Decisions. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Acquaints students with Geographic Information Systems technology as a means of selecting and comparatively analyzing prospective sites. Students will use GIS software in making location decisions.

FIRE 629. Real Estate Investment Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Housing demand forecasting, commercial site selection, and real estate investment analysis.

FIRE 635. Investments and Security Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: FIRE 520; and MGMT 524, STAT/BIOS 543, STAT 541, or MGMT 301 and MGMT 302. The process of investing in stocks and bonds in a global environment, from the analysis of individual securities to portfolio formation and evaluation, using experiential analytic exercises.

FIRE 638. Real Property Investment Law. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 323 or MGMT 530. Covers legal aspects of real property development from acquisition through disposition; emphasizes selection of appropriate ownership form, financing, operation, and tax considerations.

FIRE 639. International Finance. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: FIRE 520. A study of financial management of multinational enterprises, banks, firms with foreign subsidiaries, exporters, and service industries. Additionally, financing trade and investments, international money and capital markets, foreign exchange risks, and governmental policies will be covered.

FIRE 650. Derivatives. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: FIRE 520. Analysis of derivatives contracts: forwards, futures, swaps and options. Study of valuation, pricing and use of derivatives to manage risk in a global environment.

FIRE 654. Short-term Financial Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: FIRE 520. Techniques of short-term financial management (or working capital management) in a global environment for business firms, including understanding payment systems to achieve efficient cash management of accounts receivable, management of inventory, management of accounts payable, and short-term borrowing from banks and other suppliers of short-term credit.

FIRE 657. Current Issues in Investments and Markets. 3 Hours.

3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: FIRE 635. Advanced study of selected topics in global investments and securities markets using experiential exercises. Topics selected by the instructor. Readings from recent journals, cases, and/or software may be used. Possible topics may include: fixed income mathematics; portfolio management; advanced investments theory; factors explaining security price movements; advanced security analysis; using information to make investment decisions; and security market microstructure.

FIRE 658. Real Estate Finance and Investments. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: FIRE 431. Emphasizes economic and financial analysis of commercial real estate investments, alternative financing structures and surveys recent trends in the securitization of commercial real estate debt and equity markets.

FIRE 664. Current Issues in Corporate Finance. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: FIRE 623. Advanced study of selected topics in corporate finance and financial management in global entrepreneurial settings. Topics selected by the instructor. Readings from recent journals, cases and/or software may be used. Possible topics include: theory and evidence concerning major corporate financial policy decisions, bankruptcy costs and agency costs that relate to capital structure and dividend policy, issues in corporate control, alternative methods of issuing and retiring securities mergers and acquisitions, advanced valuation theory, advanced financial analysis, advanced capital budgeting, using information to make financial decisions.

FIRE 690. Research Seminar in Finance, Insurance and Real Estate. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed work is required by graduate studies office in the School of Business. This course is designed to provide research experience for candidates not following the FIRE 798-799 program.

FIRE 691. Topics in Finance, Insurance and Real Estate. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1, 2 or 3 credits. Prerequisites vary by topic. Study of current topics. Topics may vary from semester to semester.

FIRE 693. Field Project in Finance, Insurance and Real Estate. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed work is required by graduate studies office in the School of Business. Students will work under the supervision of a faculty adviser in planning and carrying out a practical research project using experiential exercises. A written report of the investigations is required. To be taken at the end of the program.

FIRE 697. Guided Study in Finance, Insurance and Real Estate. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed work is required by graduate studies office in the School of Business. Graduate students wishing to do research on problems in business administration or business education in an international environment will submit a detailed outline of their problem. They will be assigned reading and will prepare a written report on the problem. To be taken at the end of the program.

Information Systems (INFO)

INFO 609. Data-centric Re-engineering Analysis/Planning. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Teaches methods of monetizing or otherwise valuing intangible data practice-improvement opportunities. Students will participate in a semester-long residency in organizations. Student teams will work closely with CIOs. Each team will evaluate operational effectiveness and/or innovation opportunities and recommend specific approaches and estimated benefits. Participating CIOs will receive a professional business case -- including concrete examples -- for implementing data-centric practices in their organizations.

INFO 610. Analysis and Design of Database Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO 364. Designed to prepare students for the development of information systems using databases and database management techniques.

INFO 611. Data Re-engineering. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO 610. Teaches the process of reengineering data from current to desired structures. Covers a range of methods, tools and techniques for reverse engineering existing schemas and data structure definitions used as the basis for designing more suitable data structures. Appropriate case tools provide students with practical experience.

INFO 614. Data Mining. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 302 or permission of the instructor. A data mining process has the goal of discovering nontrivial, interesting and actionable knowledge from data in databases. The course introduces important concepts, models and techniques of data mining for modern organizations. Students gain a deeper understanding of concepts and techniques covered in lectures by doing a practical term project that applies one or more of the data mining models and techniques. Students also are given the opportunity to gain knowledge on the features and functionalities of state-of-the-art data mining software through their preparation of a research report.

INFO 616. Data Warehousing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO 610. Covers important concepts and techniques in the design and implementation of a data warehouse. Topics include the data warehouse architecture, the logical and physical design issues in the data warehousing development process, technical factors (i.e., hardware, client/server technology, data warehousing and DBMS technologies) and implementation considerations (i.e., data extraction, clean-up and transformation tools). Introduces online analytical processing and data mining. Crosslisted as: CISS 616.

INFO 620. Data Communications. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO 370. Computer network design, communication line control, and communication hardware and software.

INFO 622. Internet Security Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Studies the principles of network security and secure operating systems. Included are topics relating to the use of intrusion detection, intrusion prevention and other related tools.

INFO 630. Systems Development. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: INFO 361 and 364. Covers business process and data requirements modeling for information systems, using advanced methods and techniques. Students will gain hands-on experience developing specifications and a functional prototype application with current CASE and development tools.

INFO 632. Business Process Engineering. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Critically reviews business process (re)engineering methods and practices. The discipline of Business Process and Application Architectures and modularization are examined. Issues in the implementation of application support for business processes are discussed. The discussion includes strategy visioning, performance benchmarking, process modeling and analysis, and planning organizational change. State-of-the-art business engineering tool-sets such as SAP Business Engineer and J.D. Edwards Business Engineering tool-sets are extensively used to provide practical experience.

INFO 640. Information Systems Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO 360. A detailed study of the issues, principles, techniques and best practices in managing information systems and enterprise knowledge as organizational resources. Managing enterprise knowledge and information systems involves taking a disciplined approach to managing the infrastructures and harnessing the collective knowledge capital and brain-power of individuals and organizations. Topics include: IT operations, issues in strategic management, establishing standards and procedures, performance evaluation and benchmarking, hardware and software acquisition, physical environments and security issues, outsourcing and partnerships, personnel, knowledge ontology, meta-knowledge and others.

INFO 641. Strategic Information Systems Planning. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO 640 or INFO 661. Focuses on developing, implementing and evaluating strategic plans for corporate information systems. Assesses the role of information systems as a competitive tool. Methods and frameworks for strategic analysis are introduced. Mechanisms for establishing an information systems strategy are presented. Emphasis placed on understanding change management issues in IS planning for organizations.

INFO 642. Decision Support and Intelligent Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: INFO 610 and 630. Focuses on the design and deployment of decision technology of two broad types: decision support systems, which are meant to be employed in an advisory capacity by their human users, and intelligent systems, which are generally designed as autonomous decision agents and so intended to displace human functionaries.

INFO 643. Information Technology Project Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO 640 or 661 or permission from the director of graduate studies in the School of Business. Provides a clear understanding of project management techniques. Covers aspects of planning, organizing, controlling and implementing IT projects. IT project management processes, project scheduling and links with information systems strategy and change management are explored.

INFO 644. Principles of Computer and Information Systems Security. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO 640 or INFO 661. Explores issues related to protecting information resources of a firm. Various tools and techniques useful for assessing CISS security concerns in organizations are introduced. Principles and models for CISS security and security management are presented and selected computer and CISS security topics are introduced. Material is presented and discussed from a management frame of reference. Crosslisted as: CISS 644.

INFO 646. Security Policy Formulation and Implementation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Course covers aspects of policy formulation and implementation. A security policy is considered as a vehicle for executing good strategy. The course analyzes current problems with security strategy formulation and compliance. The content and context of security policies is evaluated to ensure effectiveness.

INFO 654. Systems Interface Design. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO 640 or 661. Analyzes factors important in designing the interface for business information systems. Includes designing and developing systems for the Internet. Requires students to work in teams to produce prototype interactive systems.

INFO 658. Securing the Internet of Things. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: INFO 661 or INFO 640. Overviews the emerging field of the Internet of Things with emphasis on how information infrastructure and networks will change the exchange of goods and services in a socially connected world. Specific topics include technological (including hardware/software) infrastructures, types of IoT applications, key IoT policy issues and future trends, IoT security, and privacy challenges in a socially connected world.

INFO 660. Introduction to Management Information Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides an understanding of the importance and role of information systems in modern business processes, analysis and decision making. Presents principles of information technology and systems methodologies for the design and development of operational, managerial and strategic business information systems. A project management focus will provide the framework for the course.

INFO 661. Information Systems for Managers. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides an understanding of the importance and role of information systems in modern business decision making. Emphasizes choices about information technology and managing projects.

INFO 664. Information Systems for Business Intelligence. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides students with techniques and practices for modern decision-making in support of business/corporate performance. Includes hands-on experience with various information analysis, business intelligence and decision support techniques and tools with applications to various business-problem scenarios, such as portfolio analysis, project selection, market research and supply-chain optimization.

INFO 690. Research Seminar in Information Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed work is required by graduate studies office in the School of Business. This course is designed to provide research experience for candidates not following the INFO 798-799 program.

INFO 691. Topics in Information Systems. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1, 2 or 3 credits. Study of current topics. Topics may vary from semester to semester.

INFO 693. Field Project in Information Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed work is required by graduate studies office in the School of Business. Students will work under the supervision of a faculty adviser in planning and carrying out a practical research project. A written report of the investigations is required. To be taken at the end of the program.

INFO 697. Guided Study in Information Systems. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 1, 2 or 3 credits. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed work is required by graduate studies office in the School of Business. Graduate students wishing to do research on problems in business administration or business education will submit a detailed outline of their problem. They will be assigned reading and will prepare a written report on the problem. To be taken at the end of the program.

INFO 700. Survey of Information Systems Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed to provide incoming Ph.D. students with an introduction to information systems research. Students will survey various research streams in the field of information systems by familiarizing themselves with the research undertaken by faculty in the IS department. During the semester, students will learn about the various research areas in light of theories that support research and the primary research methods used in these areas. In addition, students will review literature to identify critical research issues in a specific topic area chosen for research and propose solutions to address those issues.

INFO 701. Qualitative Research in Information Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment requires permission of instructor. The course is designed to cover qualitative research published in the information systems discipline and an array of qualitative research methods, including but not limited to grounded theory, positivist case studies, interpretive case studies, hermeneutics, ethnography, action research and interviewing methods. Students will be exposed to the published literature of qualitative research in the IS discipline, as well as to the principles that distinguish qualitative research from other types of IS research. The research methods and techniques will be discussed using published examples of such research. Including a project, the course will help students conduct their own qualitative research.

INFO 702. Design Science Research and Methods in Information Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment requires permission of instructor. The course is designed to explore the theories and methods that are used in the various phases of design science research. Students will be exposed to the principles that distinguish design science research from other types of information Systems research. The research methods and techniques used in the various phases of design science research will be discussed using examples from IS analysis and design, database, IS security, decision support and intelligent systems, knowledge management, or other subfields.

INFO 710. Database Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Explores advanced concepts related to management of modern organizations' data resources. Focuses on data administration and the technical aspects of database systems. Some of the database research issues covered include: data quality, design, security, metadata, XML databases and data warehousing. Prepares students for further research into aspects of database systems.

INFO 720. Analysis and Design of Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Covers the philosophical and theoretical foundations of information systems development methodologies and their evolution. Provides an intellectual foundation for students wishing to write a doctoral dissertation in this subject matter. Students will be required to read and analyze articles considered fundamental to the current understanding of the subject.

INFO 730. Information Systems Strategy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides the basis for further Ph.D.-level work in information systems strategy. Covers the theoretical foundations of the subject area. In particular the economic, phychological, sociological and cultural aspects are considered. This focus helps students to identify different research orientations and helps develop an informed opinion on critical research areas.

INFO 740. Decision Support and Intelligent Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides the basis for further Ph.D.-level work in decision support and intelligent systems. Explores the theoretical and technical aspects of the subject area. It helps students identify different research orientations with respect to the notion of intelligent systems and build an informed opinion on critical research areas. Explores issues around classes of decision predicates and decision situations. The course also helps students understand technical innovations in decision technologies as they relate to the study of decision support and intelligent systems.

INFO 750. Information Systems Security. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides the basis for further Ph.D.-level work in information systems security. Covers the theoretical aspects of the subject area. It helps students identify different research orientations with respect to IS security and build an informed opinion on critical research areas. Explores issues around what IS security is (ontology) and how to acquire the relevant knowledge (epistemology). The course also helps students understand methods of social science research as they relate to IS security.

INFO 760. Knowledge Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Explores advanced concepts related to knowledge management and knowledge discovery in modern organizations. Material for the course is drawn from research papers and doctoral dissertations. Requires a high level of student participation, particularly in their critical reviews and presentation of relevant research materials.

INFO 790. Doctoral Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Open only to Ph.D. students in business. Analyzes and critiques general theories, practices and functions in a specialized area of information systems research.

INFO 798. Thesis in Information Systems. 3 Hours.

Year course; 6 credits. Graduate students will work under supervision in outlining a graduate thesis and in carrying out the thesis.

INFO 799. Thesis in Information Systems. 3 Hours.

Year course; 6 credits. Graduate students will work under supervision in outlining a graduate thesis and in carrying out the thesis.

INFO 898. Dissertation Research in Information Systems. 1-12 Hours.

1-12 credits. Limited to Ph.D. in business candidates.

Management (MGMT)

MGMT 540. Management Theory and Practice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A foundation course that presents theories, principles and fundamentals applicable to contemporary management thought and productive activities.

MGMT 633. Issues in Labor Relations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The conceptual framework of labor relations; the interconnection between labor-management relations and the sociopolitical environment.

MGMT 634. Collective Bargaining and Labor Arbitration. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The negotiation and administration of collective bargaining contracts; the handling of grievances.

MGMT 637. Advanced Human Resource Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MGMT 540 and MGMT 524. Provides exposure to the process of managing human resources; focuses on issues concerned with business decisions about acquiring, motivating and retaining employees. Topics may include HRM planning, recruitment, selection, training, performance management, compensation and strategic human resource management. Emphasis will be given to the development, implementation and assessment of human resource management policies and practices consistent with business, legal, environmental and strategic dynamics.

MGMT 641. Organizational Leadership and Project Team Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: completion of all M.B.A. foundation courses or equivalent, or permission from the graduate studies in business office. M.B.A. students take in conjunction with ECON 610. An advanced course in management involving theories and models aimed at developing the managerial competencies needed to analyze, understand, predict and guide individual, group and organizational behavior.

MGMT 642. Business Policy and Strategy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: completion of five of the following courses -- MGMT 641; MGMT 675; ACCT 608; ECON 610; FIRE 621 or FIRE 623; INFO 661; INFO 664; MKTG 671. Integration of principles and policies of business management from the fields of accounting, economics, marketing, finance, statistics and management in the solution of broad company problems and in the establishment of company policy. Emphasis on interaction of disciplines in efficient administration of a business. Course employs case analysis approach.

MGMT 644. International Business Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON 500, MGMT 530, MGMT 540 and MKTG 570. Survey course for students interested in international and multinational management. Review of historical, governmental, monetary, and cultural issues affecting the transfer of resources and management knowledge across national boundaries; multinational business and management strategies; study of management practices in selected countries.

MGMT 649. Compensation Policy and Administration. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 637. Analysis of the concepts and processes involved in compensation systems. Includes evaluation of the internal and external dimensions of compensation, policy issues involved, concepts, and forms of compensation, administration of compensation systems, and current and future issues.

MGMT 654. Negotiations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An advanced course in management using an experiential approach to explore the practice and theory of negotiation. Topics will include basic approaches to negotiation and conflict management, negotiating in teams, negotiating with agents, ethics in negotiations and international negotiation.

MGMT 655. Entrepreneurship. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Individual and corporate entrepreneurship in high and low technology enterprises. Develops an understanding of the role of entrepreneurship in management theories and practices. Students will develop comprehensive venture analysis plans for presentation.

MGMT 656. Best Practices in Leadership. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: graduate standing. A seminar and experiential exercise course designed to raise the student’s practical awareness of major leadership behavior patterns and strategies that promote effectiveness in organizations; raise awareness, flexibility and skill with the student’s own personal leadership style; and help students practice, discuss and develop the ability to influence others over whom they may or may not exert positional authority.

MGMT 680. Health, Safety and Security Administration. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MGMT 524; and MGMT 530 or 540. Study of design and development of an effective safety or risk-control program. Topics include organizational needs and assessment, program evaluation, design/implementation of critical program components, training, accident cost-accounting, cost containment. Also addresses management strategies, communication techniques, motivation and incentive programs and other special topics.

MGMT 682. Human Resource Staffing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 637. Addresses the activities and processes that affect the staffing function. Subjects include attracting, selecting, and retaining people who will facilitate the accomplishment of organizational goals. Designed for the future human resource professional who will be involved with designing, administering, revising, and evaluating selection programs and procedures.

MGMT 684. Issues in International Human Resource Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 637 or MGMT 641. Focuses on issues affecting the application of human resource management practices in an international environment. Examines current challenges in the selection, appraisal, development, compensation and maintenance of expatriates, repatriates, host country nationals and third-country nationals. Includes contextual factors of industrial relations systems, legal environment, demographics and culture.

MGMT 691. Topics in Management. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1, 2 or 3 credits. Study of current topics. Topics may vary from semester to semester.

MGMT 693. Field Project in Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed work is required by graduate studies office in the School of Business. Students will work under the supervision of a faculty adviser in planning and carrying out a practical research project. A written report of the investigations is required. To be taken at the end of the program.

MGMT 697. Guided Study in Management. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 1, 2 or 3 credits. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed work is required by graduate studies office in the School of Business. Graduate students wishing to do research on problems in business administration or business education will submit a detailed outline of their problem. They will be assigned reading and will prepare a written report on the problem. To be taken at the end of the program.

MGMT 702. Causal Analysis for Organizational Studies. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: two graduate courses in statistics or permission of instructor. Focuses on conceptual and statistical issues involved with causal analysis with nonexperimental and experimental data. Course covers basic and advanced confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation techniques, with an emphasis on organizational and psychological applications. Crosslisted as: PSYC 702.

MGMT 703. Advanced Topics in Research Methods for Organizational Studies. 1,2 Hour.

Continuous course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisities: MGMT 632 or equivalent and permission of instructor. Students must enroll for two semesters. Extensive coverage of applications of methodological and statistical analyses to an array of disciplines related to organizational studies. Emphasizes the skills essential in designing, conducting and interpreting research. Course contact hours spread over fall, intersession and spring semesters. Credits alloted one in fall and two in spring. May be repeated once for credit as topics change each year.

MGMT 737. Seminar in Human Resources. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 637 or equivalent, or permission of intructor. Provides broad exposure to theory and research in the field of human resource management. Topics include strategic and operational human resource planning and staffing; employee relations, development and performance management; external factors such as legal and international environments; and compensation policy and practices.

MGMT 738. Special Focus in Human Resource Management: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 637 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Provides exposure to specific advanced theoretical and methodological topics related to human resource management. Topics may include staffing, training and development, motivation (i.e., compensation and rewards), HRM metrics, and validity generalization. Topics vary depending upon instructor. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered.

MGMT 743. Organizing Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 524 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Surveys the foundations of management theory as well as more recent research and theory on the leadership through which work is organized and directed.

MGMT 745. Advanced Operations Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 645 or equivalent. Advanced discussion of topics in mathematical programming and network analysis as applied to organizational decision making. Includes network flows, integer, nonlinear, and dynamic programming, and multicriteria optimization. Emphasis on applications and the use of the computer for problem solving.

MGMT 746. Cognitive and Emotional Processes in Organizations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 524 or equivalent. This course examines organizational life in terms of cognitive and emotional processes at the individual, group, and organizational level. Special attention will be given to how people perceive and evaluate each other.

MGMT 747. Seminar in Human Resources: Macro Foundations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 737 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Provides broad exposure to theory and research of how firms can use human resource management practices to enhance individual and organizational performance. Topics include emerging theoretical perspectives related to HRM systems, human capital, contextual factors and other factors that influence the linkages between human resources and performance.

MGMT 749. History of Management Thought. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 540. Traces the history of management from its beginnings to current approaches and theories.

MGMT 750. Attitudes and Motivation in Organizations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 524 or equivalent. Critical examination of classic and emerging research on attitudes and motivation in organizations, as well as their relationships to individual and organizational outcomes.

MGMT 757. Corporate Strategy and Long-range Planning. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MGMT 642 or equivalent. Analysis and evaluation of current methods and research in the areas of corporate strategy and long-range planning.

MGMT 790. Doctoral Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Open only to Ph.D. students in business. Analyzes and critiques general theories, practices and functions in a specialized area of management research.

MGMT 798. Thesis in Management. 3 Hours.

Year course; 6 credits. Graduate students will work under supervision in outlining a graduate thesis and in carrying out the thesis.

MGMT 799. Thesis in Management. 3 Hours.

Year course; 6 credits. Graduate students will work under supervision in outlining a graduate thesis and in carrying out the thesis.

MGMT 898. Dissertation Research in Management. 1-12 Hours.

1-12 credits. Limited to Ph.D. in business candidates.

Management – Master’s (MSTM)

MSTM 601. Survey of Financial and Managerial Accounting. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Restricted to students enrolled in the Master of Management program. An introduction to the essential concepts of financial and managerial accounting in a global environment, including working capital management, capital budgeting and capital structure planning.

MSTM 602. Fundamentals of Financial Management. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Restricted to students enrolled in the Master of Management program. A study of the essential concepts of financial management in a global environment, including working capital management, capital budgeting, capital structure planning and dividend policy.

MSTM 603. Essentials of Market Planning and Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to students enrolled in the Master of Management program. Presents and analyzes buyers and sellers in the marketplace, including how firms/organizations assess, analyze, create, deliver and capture value. Course incorporates the importance of customer-driven strategies and tactics for not-for-profit and public-sector organizations, as well as for-profit firms. Provides a framework for analyzing the impact of external forces on marketing decision-making, as well as the need for marketers to be ethical and socially responsible in the development and implementation of marketing plans. This framework extends not only to the traditional, domestic marketing environment, but also to global and technologically evolving (e.g., Internet) market settings.

MSTM 604. Quantitative Methods in Management. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Restricted to students enrolled in the Master of Management program. Students will develop an ability to interpret and analyze business data in a managerial decision-making context. Managerial applications are stressed in descriptive statistics, probability, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, simple regression and correlation analysis.

MSTM 605. Managing Organizations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to students enrolled in the Master of Management program. Explores the fundamental principles of management theory and practice as well as organizational behavior. Provides an understanding of teams, management principles, change and innovation within an organization.

MSTM 606. Introduction to Management Information Systems. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to students enrolled in the Master of Management program. Provides an understanding of the importance and role of information systems in modern business processes, analysis and decision-making. Presents principles of information technology and systems methodologies for the design and development of operational, managerial and strategic business information systems. A project management focus will provide the framework for the course.

MSTM 607. Production and Operations Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to students enrolled in the Master of Management program. Examines concepts relating to the operations function in both manufacturing and service organizations. The operations process is responsible for planning, organizing and controlling of resources to efficiently and effectively produce goods and services that meet organization goals. Quantitative tools of analysis used to support decision-making in the various operations management activities will be surveyed and case analysis will be employed to relate theory to practice.

MSTM 608. Customer Service Quality Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to students enrolled in the Master of Management program. Designed to enable students to understand and use appropriate concepts, frameworks and theoretical models to facilitate analysis of different types of services and customer-service settings, as well as to be able to contribute to the development and implementation of appropriate service strategies. Emphasizes other key issues facing service firms/organizations, such as managing supply and demand, the overlap in marketing/operations/human resource systems and the importance of relationship management.

MSTM 609. Management of Human Capital. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to students enrolled in the Master of Management program. Provides an overview of human resource issues and the process of managing human resources. Topics may include HRM planning, recruitment, employee development, performance management, compensation and strategic human resource management.

MSTM 610. Managerial Perspectives in a Global Environment. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to students enrolled in the Master of Management program. Emphasizes the social, legal, political and ethical responsibilities of a business to internal and external stakeholders, including investors, employees, the community and the environment. Students learn about the interconnectivity between business and natural, social and financial environments, as well as about the need to maintain and balance these to sustain current and future generations.

MSTM 620. Master of Management Project Course. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to students enrolled in the Master of Management program. Students integrate the knowledge and experience gained from courses in various business fields in order to solve a management problem for a real company. Students use a team approach and work collaboratively to analyze the problem and recommend solutions. Students will also create reports of their work using a variety of media.

Marketing (MKTG)

MKTG 570. Concepts and Issues in Marketing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Designed for graduate students with little or no undergraduate education in marketing. A study of the philosophy, environment and practice of contemporary marketing. This is a foundation course.

MKTG 656. International Marketing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Pre- or corequisite: MKTG 671. Orientation to the international market place. Formulation of international marketing strategies for firms participating in global trade. Emphasis on international environment, multinational economic blocs, international competition and development of international marketing strategies.

MKTG 657. International Market Planning Project. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MKTG 656; pre- or corequisite: MKTG 671. This course is a comprehensive real-life, field-based research and strategic planning exercise. A team of graduate business students is matched with a Virginia business that is interested in initiating or expanding export sales. Under the supervision of the instructor, the student team develops an international market plan for the client company. The team functions as an international business consultant to its assigned company.

MKTG 670. Essentials of Market Planning and Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to students enrolled in the Master of Management program. Presents and analyzes buyers and sellers in the marketplace, impact of external forces on marketing, customer-driven strategies and tactics, creation of market-driven competitive advantage, responsible and ethical marketing, Internet and global marketing.

MKTG 671. Marketing Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Detailed study of concepts and procedural alternatives in the delineation of the market target, the development and implementation of the marketing mix, and the control and analysis of the total marketing effort.

MKTG 672. Concepts in Consumer Behavior. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Pre- or corequisite: MKTG 671. A study of the pertinent psychological, sociological and anthropological variables that influence consumer activity and motivation.

MKTG 673. Marketing Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: BIOS 543, SCMA 302, SCMA 524, STAT 541 or STAT 543; pre- or corequiste: MKTG 571. A discussion of the techniques of marketing research. Special emphasis will be given to marketing problem definition, determination of information needs and current methods of analysis of marketing data.

MKTG 674. Service Quality Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Pre- or corequisite: MKTG 301 or MKTG 671. This course enables marketing students to develop a better understanding of service offerings from both a theoretical and practical perspective. Learning will focus on both private and public-sector service organizations. Students will learn how to analyze the design of service offerings, including operations, environment and people, and make recommendations for improving the offerings. The importance of internal and external customer feedback and continually measuring customer satisfaction/dissatisfaction will be highlighted as an integral part of managing service quality.

MKTG 675. Digital Marketing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MKTG 301; pre- or corequisite: MKTG 671. Focuses on the basic digital tools available to marketers. The strategic value of digital marketing to the organization as it relates to the buyer behavior model is explored through lecture, cases, guest speakers and a group project. The group project teams partners with local companies to gain practical experience with digital marketing.

MKTG 678. Marketing Analytics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SCMA 524 or STAT 541. Develops and sharpens students' analytical and statistical skills in preparation for advanced marketing decision-making. Analyses and statistical techniques covered include descriptive statistics, cross-tabulation, analysis of variance, regression and cluster analysis applied to marketing phenomena.

MKTG 690. Research Seminar in Marketing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed work is required by graduate studies office in the School of Business. This course is designed to provide research experience for candidates not following the MKTG 798-799 program.

MKTG 691. Topics in Marketing. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1, 2 or 3 credits. Study of current topics. Topics may vary from semester to semester.

MKTG 693. Field Project in Marketing. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed work is required by graduate studies office in the School of Business. Students will work under the supervision of a faculty adviser in planning and carrying out a practical research project. A written report of the investigations is required. To be taken at the end of the program.

MKTG 697. Guided Study in Marketing. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 1, 2 or 3 credits. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed work is required by graduate studies office in the School of Business. Graduate students wishing to do research on problems in business administration or business education will submit a detailed outline of their problem. They will be assigned reading and will prepare a written report on the problem. To be taken at the end of the program.

MKTG 798. Thesis in Marketing. 6 Hours.

Year course; 6 credits. Graduate students will work under supervision in outlining a graduate thesis and in carrying out the thesis.

MKTG 799. Thesis in Marketing. 6 Hours.

Year course; 6 credits. Graduate students will work under supervision in outlining a graduate thesis and in carrying out the thesis.

Supply Chain Management and Analytics (SCMA)

SCMA 500. Quantitative Foundation for Decision-making. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: MATH 141, MATH 151 or SCMA 171. A review of basic algebra with emphasis on differential and integral calculus and their application in solving business problems. These topics also provide the necessary foundation for using and understanding more advanced quantitative procedures. May not be included in the 30 semester credits of advanced work required for any of the master's degrees offered by the School of Business.

SCMA 524. Statistical Fundamentals for Business Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SCMA 171, SCMA 212, SCMA 500 or MATH 200. Develops an ability to interpret and analyze business data in a managerial decision-making context. Applications are stressed in the coverage of descriptive statistics, contingency tables, probability, sampling, correlation, confidence interval estimation, hypothesis testing and regression analysis. Business-oriented computational software will be used for data visualization and analysis. This is a foundation course.

SCMA 530. Fundamentals of the Legal Environment of Business. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The legal environment of business is examined in view of common law principles, statutory provisions and administrative regulations affecting various forms of business organizations and management obligations to the company, its owner and the public. Role of ethics and key commercial law areas are examined including Uniform Commercial Code Provisions.

SCMA 602. Global Supply Chain Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course explores supply, operations and logistics processes and how these processes are integrated with other functions within the firm and across organizations. The objective of this course is to provide students with knowledge of the fundamentals of supply chain management and how those concepts apply to business practice in a global setting.

SCMA 603. SAP ERP and Supply Chain Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course focuses on the concept of enterprise information systems as the application of information technology to support the integration of organizational processes. SAP ERP software applications will focus on the design, plan and control of supply chain management processes. Students will have extensive hands-on activities, assignments and cases using a live SAP ERP system.

SCMA 606. Supply Chain Innovation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Students are introduced to cross-disciplinary principles pertaining to creativity, design, invention and innovation. The focus is learning and applying problem-solving methodologies to address complex, open-ended supply chain problems. Innovation from individual and team perspectives is addressed to hone more comprehensively students’ problem-identification, information-gathering, conceptualization, evaluation and selection skills.

SCMA 632. Statistical Analysis and Modeling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BIOS 543, SCMA 302, SCMA 524, STAT 541 or STAT 543. Statistical analysis and modeling with an applied focus on regression modeling, analysis of variance and data collection planning. Use of business-oriented computational software will be integral to statistical analysis of data.

SCMA 643. Applied Multivariate Methods. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SCMA 524, STAT/BIOS 543 or ECON 501. Study of multivariate statistical methods frequently used in business and analytics problems including principal components, factor analysis, discriminant analysis, MANOVA, logistic regression and cluster analysis. The focus is on applying these techniques through the use of a computer package.

SCMA 645. Management Science. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BIOS 543, SCMA 301, SCMA 524, STAT 541 or STAT 543. Examines the formulation, analysis and solution of quantitative models for business problems. Problems addressed include the allocation of resources, making decisions and dealing with uncertainty. Applications relevant in diverse business disciplines will be investigated, and the models may include linear programming, simulation and other management science tools. Current computer solution methods will be utilized.

SCMA 646. Legal Foundations of Employment. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SCMA 530 or MGMT 637. Examines the laws concerning human resources in organizations. Equal Employment Opportunity, wage and hours laws, Equal Pay Act, the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, the Occupational Safety and Health Act and employee personal rights laws are emphasized.

SCMA 648. Analytics for Organizational Decision-making. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BIOS 543, SCMA 302, SCMA 524, STAT 541 or STAT 543. Analytical procedures and techniques used by organizations in reaching decisions based on data and application area knowledge. The emphasis is on the application of data-driven decision approaches to solving problems in contemporary organizations using business-oriented computational software.

SCMA 669. Developing and Implementing Forecasting Methods for Business. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BIOS 543, ECON 501, SCMA 302, SCMA 524, STAT 541 or STAT 543. Forecasting methods and applications appropriate for managerial decision-making. Methods covered include moving average and exponential smoothing, seasonal adjustments, time series, forecast averaging, new-product forecasting, and combining managerial judgment and analytical forecasts. Particular emphasis is placed on developing and implementing forecasting techniques and other analytical tools in an interactive organization and appreciation of issues and caveats associated with each technique. Course includes data acquisition and teamwork along with effective consulting, communication and presentation skills.

SCMA 675. Operations Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite:BIOS 543, SCMA 301, SCMA 524, STAT 541 or STAT 543. A systematic investigation of the concepts and issues in designing, operating and controlling productive systems in both manufacturing and services.

SCMA 677. Quality Management and Six Sigma. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: BIOS 543, SCMA 302, SCMA 524, STAT 541 or STAT 543. Concepts of quality management and Six Sigma: quality strategies, organizational quality assessment, Six Sigma process management tools and techniques, process control and improvement tools, the voice of the customer and the voice of the employee.

SCMA 690. Research Seminar in Supply Chain Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Approval of proposed work is required by graduate studies office in the School of Business. This course is designed to provide research experience for candidates pursuing a non-thesis option.

SCMA 691. Topics in Supply Chain Management and Analytics. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Study of current topics. Topics may vary from semester to semester.

SCMA 693. Field Project in Supply Chain Management and Analytics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed work is required by graduate studies office in the School of Business. Students will work under the supervision of a faculty adviser in planning and carrying out a community-engaged research project. A written report of the investigations is required.

SCMA 697. Guided Study in Supply Chain Management. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits. Prerequisite: Approval of proposed work is required by graduate studies office in the School of Business. Graduate students will submit a detailed outline of their research problem. They will be assigned reading and will prepare a written report on the problem. To be taken at the end of the program.

School of Dentistry

Dental Special Topics (DENS)

DENS 503. Introduction to Behavioral Science in Dentistry. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 16 didactic hours. 1 credit. Prerequisite: enrollment within a School of Dentistry degree program. Course consists of online lectures, discussion board activities, assigned readings and interactive activities centering on understanding health disparities and access to care issues as they relate to patient-centered care among diverse populations. Graded as pass/fail.

DENS 513. Foundations of Effective Interpersonal Skills During Patient Interactions I. 1.5 Hour.

Semester course; 1.5 lecture hours. 1.5 credits. Enrollment restricted to students in a School of Dentistry degree program. Course consists of online and face-to-face lectures, skill-building activities, student role-plays and a standardized patient assessment. Students will work both individually and in small groups for discussion and role-plays utilizing foundational motivational interviewing techniques. Graded as Pass/Fail.

DENS 515. Clinical Skills I. 1 Hour.

Semester course. 1 credit. Provides didactic information and practice opportunities to familiarize first-year dental students with patient management and selected clinical skills. The course runs concurrently with courses in periodontics and operative dentistry to provide the basis for initial entry into the dental clinic and patient care.

DENS 516. Clinical Skills II. 3.5 Hours.

4 laboratory and 15 clinical hours. 3.5 credits. Prerequisite: DENS 515. The second in a four-part series of courses designed to prepare dental students for entry into the clinical training environment. Students' learning experiences include didactic lectures, clinical practice and observation, and simple patient-based interactions and/or procedures performed while assisting more senior dental students. Enrollment is restricted to admitted dental students.

DENS 524. Evidence-based Dentistry and Critical Thinking I. 1 Hour.

1 credit. The fundamentals of evidence-based dentistry will be taught. Students will gain the ability to identify, retrieve and critically appraise dental literature.

DENS 550. Update in Practice Administration. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 15 seminar hours. 1 credit. Lectures and seminar discussion on the business aspects of contemporary specialty dental practice, with emphasis on entry into practice, associateship contracts, financing arrangements, risk management and employee relations.

DENS 580. Biostatistics and Research Design in Dentistry. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 30 seminar hours. 2 credits. Must be taken for two consecutive semesters. Provides the advanced education student in dentistry an appreciation for the need for and uses of fundamental biostatistical methods in dental applications. Appropriate research designs for answering research questions of importance in dentistry will be examined. An array of biostatistical methods that are commonly used in the dental literature and by agencies such as the FDA to evaluate new dental products and methodologies are discussed.

DENS 603. Foundations of Effective Interpersonal Skills During Patient Interactions II. 1 Hour.

Yearlong course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Prerequisite: DENS 513. The two-semester course consists of online and face-to-face lectures, skill-building activities, student role-plays and a standardized patient assessment (spring). Students will work both individually and in small groups for discussion and role-plays of cases utilizing foundational motivational interviewing techniques. Students receive CO grading in the fall semester and a Pass/Fail grade upon completion.

DENS 604. Selective Special Topics in Oral Research I. 0.5 Hours.

Semester course; 0.5 lecture hours. 0.5 credits. Open to any dental student with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and in good academic standing. This introductory course will introduce students to the basics of research and innovation. Lectures will provide a framework for students to pose a research question, formulate a methodology and conduct experiments. Assignments will introduce students to analyzing and presenting research. Students will also learn the fundamentals of innovation protection. Graded as pass/fail.

DENS 605. Selective Special Topics in Oral Research II. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Prerequisite: DENS 604 or permission of instructor. Enrollment restricted to dental students with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and in good academic standing. Students will be introduced to writing a fellowship proposal. Lectures and workshops will guide students through the process of applying for an AD Williams fellowship. Students will also begin their independent research. Graded as pass/fail.

DENS 606. Selective Special Topics in Oral Research III. 0.5-2 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours (3 research hours per credit). 0.5-2 credits. May be repeated for a maximum total of 16 credits. Prerequisite: DENS 605 or permission of instructor. Enrollment restricted to dental students with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and in good academic standing. Independent study and individual research experiences will be conducted under the guidance of a research mentor. Graded as pass/fail.

DENS 611. Introduction to Professionalism, Ethics and Ethical Decision-making. 1 Hour.

Semester course. 1 credit. Provides a review of the foundation of ethical principles, concepts of professionalism, professional student behavior and responsibilities, ethical issues guiding dentistry, and the development of an ethical decision-making model.

DENS 619. Evidence-based Dentistry and Critical Thinking II. 1 Hour.

1 credit. The fundamentals of evidence-based dentistry will be taught. Students will gain the ability to identify, retrieve and critically appraise dental literature.

DENS 621. Dental Occlusion. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 3 laboratory hours. 1.0 credit lecture with 1.0 credit laboratory. Consists of lectures and laboratory components which expand on the basic concepts that were presented in the fundamentals of occlusion course. Focuses on the examination, diagnosis and treatment planning of various occlusal problems. The student will learn the skills needed to analyze the dental occlusion of patients and to plan successful occlusal therapy, including restorative procedures and fixed prosthodontics treatment.

DENS 623. Clinical Skills IV. 7 Hours.

Semester course; lecture and clinic contact hours. 7 credits. Fourth in the clinical skills series, this course is designed to develop students' familiarity with and confidence in the clinical setting prior to beginning clinical care of their own patient pool. Students will have the opportunity to assist more senior students within their practice group and to perform simple operative procedures.

DENS 625. Clinical Skills III. 5 Hours.

Semester course; lecture and clinic contact hours. 5 credits. Designed to evaluate the student's ability to perform specific clinical skills and to provide a variety of experiences to prepare for entry to the school’s student clinical practice. Case-based, problem-oriented histories will provide the foundation for development of phased treatment plans and a series of mannequin exercises. Students will have simulated and patient-based experiences during assigned rotations in the school’s patient care clinics. Experiences are provided to enhance the student's communication skills as an oral health professional functioning as a component of a health care team. Rotations are coordinated with the spring clinical skills IV course.

DENS 628. Evidence-based Patient Care I. 1 Hour.

1 credit. Students will learn to apply the fundamentals of evidence-based dentistry to practical application in patient care.

DENS 630. Orthodontic-Periodontic-AEGD Conference. 0.5 Hours.

Semester course; 8 seminar hours. 1 credit. Must be taken every semester of the program. Discusses treatment planning and analysis of patients requiring combined orthodontic, periodontic and restorative care. Presents topics of interest to orthodontists, periodontists and general dentists. Graded S/U/F.

DENS 642. Fundamentals of Treatment Planning. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Open only to second-year D.D.S. students. Designed to build upon the student’s prior exposure to discipline-based treatment planning concepts. Students will develop an integrated, multidisciplinary approach to urgent and oral disease control phase patient treatment planning. The course will also cover the use of information technology applications to document treatment plans and strategies for effectively communicating treatment plans to patients. Graded P/F.

DENS 651. Preclinical General Practice Dentistry Lab. 5 Hours.

Semester course; 200 laboratory hours. 5 credits. Admission into VCU International Dentist Program required. Designed to prepare and transition a class of internationally trained dentists into the third year of dental school at VCU. All aspects of preclinical dentistry will be covered in this basic preparatory laboratory course. Graded P/F.

DENS 652. Preclinical General Practice Dentistry Lecture. 9 Hours.

Semester course; 144 lecture hours. 9 credits. Admission into VCU International Dentist Program required. Designed to prepare and transition a class of internationally trained dentists into the third year of dental school at VCU. All aspects of preclinical dentistry will be covered in this basic preparatory lecture course. Graded P/F.

DENS 653. Clinical General Practice Dentistry Lecture. 6 Hours.

Semester course; 96 lecture hours. 6 credits. Admission into VCU International Dentist Program required. Comprises clinical experiences prior to the third year of professional study. This course is designed to enhance the student’s clinical experience in patient management, treatment planning, utilization of dental auxiliaries, consultation with other health care professionals and referral to appropriate dental specialists. Specialty subjects and techniques will be combined to form a general dentistry model for patient care. Guidance from faculty will encourage the student to synthesize and integrate materials, methods and techniques from previous courses into a logical and systematic approach to the delivery of oral health care. Small-group seminars will be provided to enhance the student’s transition to dental health care at VCU. Graded P/F.

DENS 654. Clinical General Practice Dentistry Lab. 5 Hours.

Semester course; 200 laboratory hours. 5 credits. Enrollment requires admission into the VCU International Dentist Program. Prerequisite: DENS 652. Comprises clinical experiences prior to the third year of professional study. This course is designed to enhance the student’s clinical experience in patient management, treatment planning, utilization of dental auxiliaries, consultation with other health care professionals and referral to appropriate dental specialists. Specialty subjects and techniques will be combined to form a general dentistry model for patient care. Guidance from faculty will encourage the student to synthesize and integrate materials, methods and techniques from previous courses into a logical and systematic approach to the delivery of oral health care. Small-group seminars will be provided to enhance the student’s transition to dental health care at VCU. Graded pass/fail.

DENS 655. Preclinical General Practice Dentistry for Internationally Trained Dentists. 6 Hours.

Yearlong course; 6 lecture hours. 6 credits. Designed to support the integration of a class of internationally trained dentists into the second year at the VCU School of Dentistry, this course addresses special topics of concern for this cohort. The course will cover core didactic material and laboratory activities and will strengthen areas that have been previously identified as opportunities for growth in this student population. Students receive CO grading in the fall and a pass or fail grade and earned credit in the spring.

DENS 660. Interdisciplinary Care Conference. 0.5 Hours.

Continuing course; 7 hours. 1 credit. Must be taken every year of the program. Provides a forum for formal presentation and group discussion of the diagnosis, treatment planning, delivery and prognosis of interdisciplinary dental care. Designed for continuing enrollment for two academic semesters; graded CO in the fall and a final grade of Pass or Fail in the spring.

DENS 699. Thesis Guidance. 1-2 Hours.

Semester course; 18-36 seminar hours. 1-2 credits. Must be taken every semester of the program. The graduate student selects a research project topic, conducts the necessary background literature review, develops a protocol, obtains the necessary materials, instruments and human/animal use approvals as necessary, collects and analyzes the data, presents the findings in the form of a master's thesis, and prepares a manuscript for publication.

DENS 700. Basic Sciences and Graduate Dentistry. 3 Hours.

First year; spring course; 45 hours. 3 credits. Advanced level survey of topic areas related to the principles and practices of dentistry including: oral pathology, biochemistry and physiology, infection and immunity, pharmacology, biomaterials and genetics.

DENS 701. Remediation in Dentistry. 1-7 Hours.

Semester course; variable contact hours. Variable credits. This course is not part of the core D.D.S. curriculum. Students who must remediate a course, for any reason, will be enrolled in this course during their remediation period and credit hours will be assigned consistent with the course being remediated. A grade of pass/fail will be assigned at the completion of the remediation period.

DENS 702. Dental Clinics. 1-12 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours, clinical contact. 1-12 credits. May be repeated for credits. Restricted to students enrolled in D.D.S. program. This course is designed for students who need to remediate clinical experiences, make up clinical experiences or are off cycle with clinical work for any other reason. Credit hours, learning objectives and exact expectations/responsibilities will be identified in an individualized education plan for each student as determined by the school’s deans for clinical education and academic affairs. Graded pass/fail.

DENS 703. Advanced Interpersonal Communications I. 1 Hour.

Yearlong course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Enrollment restricted to students in a School of Dentistry degree program. This is a two-semester course which introduces third-year dental students to goal setting/change plans and advanced motivational interviewing techniques. The course consists of online and face-to-face lectures, skill-building activities, student role-plays and a patient assessment (spring). Students receive CO grading in the fall semester and a Pass/Fail grade upon completion.

DENS 704. Academic Dental Career Exploration Elective. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 3 laboratory hours. 1 credit. Exact contact hours will vary by student and their self-designed learning plan. Enrollment restricted to students in the D.D.S. program with permission of the course director. This is an elective course for D2, D3 or D4 dental students who are interested in learning more about academic dental teaching and/or research careers. The course matches each student with a faculty mentor who provides insight into the day-to-day life of an educator or researcher. This elective is modeled on the ADEA Academic Dental Careers Fellowship Program. Graded as Pass/Fail.

DENS 713. Advanced Interpersonal Communications II. 1 Hour.

Yearlong course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Enrollment restricted to students in a School of Dentistry degree program. This is a two-semester course for fourth-year dental students to integrate behavioral science content, advanced motivational interviewing techniques and emotional intelligence skills into professional practice. The course consists of online and face-to-face lectures, skill-building activities, student role-plays and a patient assessment (fall). Students receive CO grading in the fall semester and a Pass/Fail grade upon completion.

DENS 730. Dental Practice Management III. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 credit. The third in a series of four courses required over the duration of the four-year DDS curriculum. The series will prepare the dental graduate for making decisions about the type of practice to pursue, planning to establish or purchase a practice and, ultimately, managing it once in operation. Topics covered are those appropriate to the third-year dental student and may include, but are not limited to, marketing a practice, selecting the right location, ergonomics and managing the dental office. Graded as P/F.

DENS 735. Patient Management and Professional Conduct. 2.5 Hours.

Semester course; clinical contact hours. 2.5 credits. May be repeated for credit. Designed for third-year dental students to understand and practice the concepts of ethical conduct, patient management, risk management and professional responsibility. This course is based upon the application of the VCU School of Dentistry Code of Professional Conduct, the ADA Principles of Ethics and Code of Professional Conduct, and the School of Dentistry’s Patient Bill of Rights in the clinical setting and is designed to help the dental student strive to do what is right for their patients, now and into the future.

DENS 740. Dental Practice Management IV. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 credit. The fourth in a series of four courses required over the duration of the four-year DDS curriculum. The series will prepare the dental graduate for making decisions about the type of practice to pursue, planning to establish or purchase a practice and, ultimately, managing it once in operation. Topics covered are those appropriate to the senior dental student and may include, but are not limited to, writing a business plan and understanding the current economy and its impact on dental practice. Graded as P/F.

DENS 745. Patient Management and Professional Conduct. 2.5 Hours.

Semester course; clinical contact hours. 2.5 credits. May be repeated for credit. Designed for fourth-year dental students to understand and practice the concepts of ethical conduct, patient management, risk management and professional responsibility. This course is based upon the application of the VCU School of Dentistry Code of Professional Conduct, the ADA Principles of Ethics and Code of Professional Conduct, and the School of Dentistry’s Patient Bill of Rights in the clinical setting and is designed to help the dental student strive to do what is right for their patients, now and into the future.

DENS 752. Clinical General Practice Dentistry. 14.5 Hours.

Yearlong course; 7-8 clinic sessions per week. 14.5 credits. Enrollment restricted to fourth-year dental students. Course encompasses all clinical patient care instruction within the School of Dentistry group practices. This course is designed to enhance the student’s clinical experience in patient management, treatment planning, utilization of dental auxiliaries, consultation with other health care professionals and referral to appropriate dental specialists.

DENS 762. Clinical Service-learning. 6 Hours.

Yearlong course; 50 clinical sessions. 6 credits. A course-based, credit-bearing educational experience in which students participate in an organized service activity that meets community-identified needs. During the course, students are assigned rotations in clinical practice settings in underserved areas. In these settings, students are exposed to patients of varied ethnic, socioeconomic and demographic backgrounds, as well as special patient populations not typically encountered in the School of Dentistry clinics. Students have the opportunity to make oral health care more accessible to marginalized groups while continuing clinical education. Throughout this unique learning experience students are exposed to the benefits of potential practice in public health dentistry. Students will reflect on the service activity to increase understanding and application of course content and to enhance a sense of civic responsibility. Course graded as CO with no credit for fall semester; P/F and credit assigned for spring semester.

DENS 780. Functional Occlusion: From TMJ to Smile Design Selective. 1.5 Hour.

Yearlong course; 1 lecture and 1 laboratory hour. 1.5 credits. Enrollment restricted to selected D4 dental students and AEGD residents. The course consists of lectures and clinic/laboratory components, which expand on the basic concepts that were presented in core D.D.S. curriculum. Students receive CO grading in the fall and Pass/Fail grade and earned credit in the spring.

DENS 790. Selective: Applications of 3D Printing in Dentistry. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture and .5 clinic hours. 1 credit. Enrollment restricted to students admitted to D.D.S. program and selected by course faculty. The course has three components: 1) an online self-learning module on basic principles of 3D printing and its applications in biological science and health science, as well as principle and workflow for implant-guided surgery, 2) a workshop on implant treatment planning using commercially available software and 3D printing of models and surgical guide and 3) a patient-based observation experience in implant-guided surgery. The course is designed for students to use the most up-to-date digital technology to diagnose and treat real clinical cases. Graded as Pass/Fail.

Endodontics (ENDO)

ENDO 522. Introduction: Specialty of Endodontics. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 96 laboratory hours. 2 credits. Restricted to first-year students. Utilizes laboratory exercises to review basic concepts and introduce the more complex technical procedures required to practice the clinical specialty of endodontics.

ENDO 530. Advanced Oral Pathology. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 13 seminar hours. 1 credit. Provides through a series of seminars, an in-depth knowledge of those specific areas of oral pathology that apply to endodontics.

ENDO 532. Management of Medical Emergencies in the Dental Office. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 20 seminar hours. 1 credit. Provides through a series of seminars, an in-depth level of knowledge in the management of medical emergencies in the dental office.

ENDO 560. Endodontic Therapy Lectures. 3.5 Hours.

Semester course; 58 lecture hours. 3.5 credits. Restricted to first-year students. Presents a series of lectures on clinical endodontic topics in order to familiarize the students with clinical endodontic procedures either in conjunction with or prior to the "Endodontic Topic Literature Reviews" on these specific clinical topics.

ENDO 622. Principles of Endodontics. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Covers the basic principles of endodontics in preparation for clinical endodontics.

ENDO 623. Principles of Endodontics Lab. 1.5 Hour.

Semester course; 4 laboratory hours. 1.5 credits. This lab course teaches the basic technical skills of endodontics in preparation for clinical endodontics.

ENDO 650. Endodontic Topic Literature Review. 3.5 Hours.

Semester course; 58 seminar hours. 3.5 credits. May be repeated for credit. Must be taken every semester of the program. Reviews topic literature pertaining to the scientific basis for endodontic procedures and the materials and techniques utilized in the clinical practice of endodontics. Discusses content of the reviewed literature and critically evaluates by means of abstracts and study questions.

ENDO 652. Endodontic Clinical Seminars. 1.5 Hour.

Semester course; 28 seminar hours. 1.5 credits. May be repeated for credit. Must be taken every semester of the program. Requires students to present a seminar once each month in which difficult diagnostic cases, patient management problems and complex treatment cases are critiqued and treatment options discussed.

ENDO 654. Endodontic Management of the Medically Compromised Patient. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 14 seminar hours. 1 credit. Must be taken for two consecutive semesters. Provides students, through a seminar series, with an in-depth level of knowledge in the endodontic management of the medically compromised patient.

ENDO 656. Endodontic Current Literature Review. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 18 seminar hours. 1 credit. Must be taken every semester of the program. Provides a review of current journal literature that pertains to the scientific basis for endodontic procedures, materials and techniques currently being used in the clinical practice of endodontics. Discusses and critically evaluates the content of the reviewed literature. Requires written abstracts of all reviewed articles.

ENDO 680. Clinical Endodontics. 1-5 Hours.

Semester course; 153 clinical sessions. Variable for 1-5 credits. Must be taking both fall and spring of the first and second years of the program for 5 credits each semester. May be taken in additional semesters as needed to complete clinical training; credit will vary based on circumstances. Permits students to receive supervised training in every type of clinical endodontic procedure. Provides students with experience in the management and treatment of cases which are the same types of complex non-surgical and surgical cases treated in a specialty practice of endodontics.

ENDO 700. Senior Selective in Advanced Clinical Endodontics. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 4 clinical hours per week. 1 credit. Prerequisites: successful completion of ENDO 622 (sections .01 and .02), ENDO 731, ENDO 739 and permission of the course director. This clinical course is designed to develop advanced skills in treating endodontic cases beyond the scope of those expected in basic clinical competency of a dental student.

ENDO 731. Endodontic Therapy. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture contact hour. 1 credit. An application course designed for the student to gain experience and demonstrate proficiency in the application of clinical endodontic knowledge to the diagnosis and management of complex clinical endodontic problems. Emphasis is placed on differential diagnosis and management of clinical endodontic problems. This course builds on the principles of diagnosis and treatment of disease of the pulp and periradicular tissues and injuries of the dental pulp. This course continues to place emphasis on the prevention of disease and maintenance of the normal pulpodentin complex.

ENDO 739. Clinical Endodontics III. 1.5 Hour.

Yearlong clinical course. 1.5 credits. Designed to develop clinical skills and provide experience in the diagnosis, treatment planning, treatment, prognosis, follow-up care and clinical patient management in cases involving the pulp and periradicular tissues. Emphasis is placed on the management of common clinical problems that may be encountered in the general practice of dentistry. This course emphasizes and elaborates on the rationale and treatment techniques presented in the D-2 didactic and laboratory course.

ENDO 749. Clinical Endodontics IV. 1.5 Hour.

Yearlong course; 1 clinic session per week.1.5 credits. This course is designed to enhance the student’s clinical experience in the field of endodontics, to include patient management, treatment planning, endodontic treatment modalities, consultation with other health care professionals and referral to appropriate dental specialists. Emphasis is placed on the management of common clinical endodontic problems that may be encountered in the general practice of dentistry. The course will run the spring and fall semester of the dental student’s fourth year. Guidance from faculty will encourage the student to synthesize and integrate techniques taught in previous endodontic courses and labs into a logical and systematic approach to the delivery of quality endodontic care to the patients. Students receive CO grading in the fall and a pass or fail grade and earned credit in the spring.

Orthodontics (ORTH)

ORTH 532. Biomechanics: Theoretical Basis for Tooth Movement. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 15 lecture/seminar hours. 1 credit. Introduces physical science of mechanics and engineering statics as applied to orthodontic force systems. Emphasizes equilibrium and the biological manifestation of force systems applied to the dentition and craniofacial skeleton.

ORTH 620. Orthodontic Clinic for Non-orthodontic Graduate Students. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 30 clinical sessions. 1 credit. Must be taken every semester of the program. Allows residents to diagnose and treat limited orthodontic problems with special emphasis on the primary and mixed dentitions. Includes, but is not limited to, anterior and posterior crossbites, space and tooth loss, transient or definitive crowding and tooth irregularities, oral habits, ectopic and other tooth eruption problems.

ORTH 623. Orthodontics Lecture. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture contact hours. 2 credits. An introduction to orthodontics meant to provide second-year dental students with a basic understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of orthodontic problems. The emphasis will be on understanding basic, universally applicable orthodontic concepts rather than on learning specific details relating to particular treatment mechanisms or appliances. This is consistent with current trends in the specialty, which recognize that orthodontic solutions are often attainable by many routes, with a common goal of maximizing the functional, esthetic and stable end result. There will be an overview of growth and development, emphasizing how favorable or unfavorable growth may influence orthodontic diagnosis and treatment. A detailed description of the development of occlusion will also be presented with an emphasis on recognizing and diagnosing abnormalities related to tooth eruption and craniofacial growth.

ORTH 650. Literature Review. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 30 seminar hours. 2 credits. Must be taken every semester of the program. Reviews classical articles in areas of special orthodontic interest. Establishes the state-of-the-art and existing information base. Gives special attention to research methodology and conclusions reached.

ORTH 652. Growth and Development. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 30 lecture/seminar hours. 2 credits. Must be taken every semester of the program. Discusses the increases in size and complexity that occur in the craniofacial region including variations in proportionality and related variations in facial form and dental occlusion. Provides special emphasis on compensations in skeletal and soft tissue structures. Examines the basis for prediction of change.

ORTH 654. Orthodontic Diagnosis and Treatment Planning. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 30 seminar hours. 2 credits. Must be taken every semester of the program. Considers and discusses available and theoretical options for clinical management of variations in facial form and dental occlusion.

ORTH 656. Current Literature. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 30 seminar hours. 2 credits. Must be taken every semester of the program. Presents in a journal-club-format evaluation of current information in orthodontics and related disciplines. Includes special emphasis on research methodology and the contributions of current research to advances in orthodontics.

ORTH 658. Analysis of Orthodontic Treatment. 1.5 Hour.

Semester course; 22.5 seminar hours. 1.5 credits. Must be taken every semester of the program. Analyzes cephalometric and other objective measures of the outcomes of orthodontic therapy. Reviews treatment objectives with respect to actual changes effected in patients. Delineates changes resulting from therapy from normal variations in craniofacial development.

ORTH 660. Orthognathic Conference. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 15 seminar hours. 1 credit. Must be taken every semester of the program. Presents patients requiring coordinated orthodontic and oral surgery care. Emphasizes long- and short-term biologic stability of alterations in the structure and function of the craniofacial skeleton with increased emphasis on facial form and dental occlusion.

ORTH 662. Craniofacial Anomalies. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 15 lecture/seminar hours. 1 credit. Must be taken every semester of the program. Discusses the etiology and embryologic basis of congenital and acquired deformities in the craniofacial structures. Emphasizes syndromes with craniofacial manifestations and the diagnosis and treatment planning for patients with facial clefts.

ORTH 680. Orthodontic Clinic. 1-6.5 Hours.

Semester course; 195 clinic sessions. Variable for 1-6.5 credits. Must be taking both fall and spring of the first and second years of the program for 6.5 credits each semester. May be taken in additional semesters as needed to complete clinical training; credit will vary based on circumstances. Involves supervised experiences in treatment of a complete spectrum of normally occurring orthodontic problems in an environment simulating private practice. Graded P/F.

ORTH 700. Senior Selective in Orthodontics. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 4 clinical and 1 seminar hours per week. 4 credits. Prerequisites: successful completion of ORTH 623, ORTH 733, ORTH 739 and permission of the course director. A clinical and didactic course designed for students who wish to gain advanced knowledge of orthodontics in an environment simulating a practice setting. The course will include participation in seminars, clinical activities and hospital rotations for craniofacial patients. The course will extend over the fall and spring semesters and will provide an excellent preparation for students entering the private practice of dentistry or students seeking graduate education in the field of orthodontics. A maximum of four students will be chosen to participate in this selective each year. Graded CO for the fall semester and P/F for the spring.

ORTH 733. Orthodontic Therapy. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture contact hour. 1 credit. Consists of didactic lectures, a continuation of ORTH 623.

Pediatric Dentistry (PEDD)

PEDD 511. General Anesthesia Rotation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 40 clinical sessions. 3 credits. Teaches general anesthesia with special emphasis in pediatrics. Allows students to become knowledgeable in pre-operative evaluation, risk assessment, assessing the effects of pharmacologic agents, venipuncture techniques, airway management, general anesthetic induction and intubation, administration of anesthetic agents, patient monitoring, prevention and management of anesthetic emergencies, recovery room management, postoperative appraisal and follow-up.

PEDD 512. Growth and Development. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 16 lecture/seminar hours. 1 credit. Lecture format provides foundational knowledge on the growth and development of the head and neck to include oral embryology and development of the dentition.

PEDD 514. Introduction to Pediatric Dentistry. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 30 lecture hours. 2 credits. Introduces material in pediatric dentistry. Involves didactic, clinical and laboratory portions.

PEDD 572. Pediatric Dental Emergency Service. 2.5 Hours.

Semester course; 30 clinical sessions. 2.5 credits. Must be taken for two consecutive semesters. Graduate students are scheduled for emergency services on a weekly basis. Offers experience in the assessment and management of orofacial trauma, dental pain and infections.

PEDD 612. Seminar Series: Pediatric Dentistry and Medicine. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 30 lecture/seminar hours. 2 credits. Must be taken every semester of the program. Provides an arena for students to present seminars in either a clinical area or medical conditions of interest to pediatric dentists. Gives students practical experience in giving formal presentations and provides him/her with information related to clinical subject area(s) with medical conditions about which pediatric dentists should be knowledgeable.

PEDD 620. Pediatric Medicine Rotation. 1.5 Hour.

Semester course; 40 clinical sessions. 1.5 credits. Requires students to obtain and evaluate medical histories, parental interviews, system-oriented physical examinations, clinical assessments of healthy and ill patients, selection of laboratory tests and evaluation of data, evaluation of physical, motor and sensory development, genetic implications of childhood diseases, the use of drug therapy in the management of diseases and parental management through discussions and explanations.

PEDD 640. Clinical Teaching. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 25 clinical sessions. 2 credits. May be repeated for credit. Must be taken every semester of the program. Lectures and clinical instruction involving contact with third and forth-year dental students. Provides teaching experience in diagnosis and treatment planning, restorative preparations and management of children's behavior.

PEDD 650. Literature Review. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 30 lecture/seminar hours. 2 credits. Must be taken every semester of the program. Reviews literature related to all aspects of the pediatric patient. Emphasizes the ability students to discuss the content of the articles and to critically evaluate it. Stresses the integration of new material with previously discussed literature and collateral material. Uses the reading list from the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry.

PEDD 654. Treatment Planning Seminar. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 16 lecture/seminar hours. 1 credit. May be repeated for a total of four credits. Must be taken every semester of the program. Provides diagnosis and treatment planning of the child, adolescent and special patient. Follows up on records on completed cases, which also are presented and evaluated. Discusses the techniques employed and the justification of the treatment.

PEDD 656. Current Literature Review. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 16 lecture/seminar hours. 1 credit. May be repeated for credit. Discusses articles from recent publications relating to all aspects of pediatric dentistry. Covers and critically reviews the Policies and Guidelines of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry.

PEDD 680. Pediatric Dental Clinic. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; 120 clinical sessions. Variable for 1-4 credits. Must be taking both fall and spring of the first and second years of the program for 4 credits each semester. May be taken in additional semesters as needed to complete clinical training; credit will vary based on circumstances. Provides for the clinical management of pediatric dental patients. Provides experiences in the treatment of infants, preschool children, adolescent and special patients. Stresses pharmacological and non-pharmacological techniques and behavior management.

PEDD 700. Senior Selective in Pediatric Dentistry. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 4 clinical hours per week. 1 credit. Prerequisites: successful completion of PEDD 611 and PEDD 733 and permission of the course director. This is a clinical course that provides students with more advanced experiences and techniques in pediatric dentistry.

PEDD 701. Selective in Special Care Dentistry. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 4 clinical hours/week. 1 credit. Prerequisites: D4 standing and selection by course faculty. This course is designed to give the interested student clinical exposure to the comprehensive dental care of individuals who have special health care needs. Graded as pass/fail.

PEDD 730. Special Care Dentistry. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Enrollment restricted to dental students with D3 standing. This course is designed to enhance the dental student’s understanding of the complexities of providing care for individuals with special health care needs.

PEDD 733. Advanced Pediatric Dentistry. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture contact hour. 1 credit. Designed to supplement and reinforce the student’s knowledge of diagnosis, treatment planning and basic skills for management of the pediatric dental patient. This includes a review of basic pediatric clinical procedures and introduction to the treatment of pediatric patients with special needs.

PEDD 739. Clinical Pediatric Dentistry III. 1 Hour.

Yearlong course; 48 clinical hours. 1 credit. Clinical rotation course designed to introduce the student to the basics of clinical pediatric dentistry and to prepare the student for PEDD 749. Students receive CO grading in the fall semester and a letter grade upon completion.

PEDD 749. Clinical Pediatric Dentistry IV. 0.5 Hours.

Semester course; 29 clinical hours. 0.5 credits. Prerequisites: successful completion of all prior courses in pediatric dentistry and D4 class standing. This course is offered as a one-week clinical rotation during the senior year of the dental curriculum. Students will build upon and refine the skills developed during the D3 clinical experience. Pediatric dentistry is a unique experience because of the young patient population and psychological skills are centrally important to delivering patient care. The course has a strong emphasis on developing behavioral, communication and patient-management skills.

Periodontics (PERI)

PERI 508. Physical Diagnosis. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 30 lecture hours. 2 credits. Provides lectures and hands on experience in physical diagnosis, history taking, general physical examination and review of major organ systems.

PERI 511. Anesthesiology Rotation. 1.5 Hour.

Semester course; 45 clinical sessions. 1.5 credits. Provides students with experience in general anesthesia under the direction of the dental anesthesiologist. Emphasizes operating room procedures, airway management, intravenous technique, anesthetics and resuscitative procedures. Includes clinical management of conscious sedation cases.

PERI 512. Conscious Sedation. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 30 lecture/seminar hours. 2 credits. Reviews concepts of parental conscious sedation techniques to include anatomy and physiology of the respiratory, cardiovascular and central nervous system, drug pharmacology, intravenous technique, prevention, recognition and management of complications, management of emergencies, physiologic monitoring and equipment, basic life support and advanced cardiac life support.

PERI 514. Introduction to Periodontics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 48 lecture/seminar hours. 3 credits. Provides students with an introduction to the clinical practice of periodontics. Emphasizes diagnosis, etiology, prognosis, treatment planning, initial therapy, therapeutic approaches, suturing techniques, oral hygiene and dental photography.

PERI 515. Internal Medicine Rotation. 1.5 Hour.

Semester course; 45 clinic sessions. 1.5 credits. Provides students with experience in internal medicine under the direct supervision of the Department of Internal Medicine. Emphasizes hospital procedures and management of the medically-compromised patient.

PERI 520. Principles of Periodontics. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 30 lecture/seminar hours. 2 credits. Must be taken for two consecutive semesters. Reviews the principles of the basic science of periodontology, including anatomy of the periodontium, classification, etiology, diagnosis, scaling and root planning, and treatment planning. Reviews the indications and contraindications for management of complex periodontal problems. Reviews the principles of non-surgical and surgical techniques.

PERI 525. Diagnosis of Periodontal Diseases. 1 Hour.

The first in a four-part series of didactic courses designed to prepare the dental student for the clinical diagnosis and management of periodontal diseases. Through this course, students will develop a fundamental understanding of how to assess patients for periodontal disease and how to develop a specific diagnosis. Enrollment is restricted to admitted dental students.

PERI 526. Etiology and Pathogenesis of Periodontal Diseases. 1.5 Hour.

1.5 credits. The second in a four-part series of didactic courses designed to prepare the dental student for the clinical diagnosis and management of periodontal diseases. Through this course, students will build upon their knowledge of diagnosis and develop their understanding of the causes, mechanisms and development of periodontal disease. Enrollment is restricted to admitted dental students.

PERI 552. Implantology. 1,2 Hour.

Semester course; 16 lecture/seminar hours. 1 credit. Covers the historical review of dental implants, including biologic principles, techniques and systems; diagnosis, interdisciplinary considerations, treatment planning and indications and contraindications for implants; wound healing for implants, including osseointegration, surgical techniques and implant maintenance. Provides a hands-on technique laboratory.

PERI 619. Clinical Pathology Rotation. 0.5 Hours.

Semester course; 21 clinic sessions. 0.5 credit. Provides instruction in patient assessment, biopsy technique, assessment of tissue preparations and review of oral histologic slide materials.

PERI 627. Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy. 1.5 Hour.

The third in a four-part series of didactic courses designed to prepare the dental student for the clinical diagnosis and management of periodontal diseases. Through this course, students will add to their skill set a conceptual knowledge of non-surgical treatment options for periodontal disease. Enrollment is restricted to admitted dental students.

PERI 630. Medicine: Oral Medicine Seminar. 1.5 Hour.

Semester course; 26 seminar hours. 1.5 credits May be repeated for credit. Must be taken every semester of the program. Emphasizes diagnosis, pathogenesis, oral manifestations and management of systemic diseases. Reviews the management of the medically-compromised patient, including laboratory procedures, pharmacology, hematology and reviews of the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine and neurologic systems. Discusses and critically evaluates medical and oral medicine topics relative to management of the periodontal patient.

PERI 650. Periodontal Literature Review. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 48 seminar hours. 3 credits. Must be taken every semester of the program. Reviews the periodontal literature from early classic articles to current publications pertaining to the scientific basis for periodontal procedures. Reviews the concepts of diagnosis, etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, therapy, maintenance of periodontal diseases and implantology. Discusses content of the literature by means of abstracts and study questions.

PERI 654. Treatment Plan: Case Presentations. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 12 seminar hours. 1 credit. Must be taken every semester of the program. Emphasizes the interpretation the medical and dental histories, radiographic and clinical findings, diagnosis, etiology, prognosis, treatment planning, therapy and supportive periodontal care. Discusses the content of reviewed cases by written and oral presentations. Requires the student to assimilate and interpret clinical findings.

PERI 656. Current Literature Review. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 36 seminar hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for credit. Must be taken every semester of the program. Provides an in-depth review of contemporary periodontal literature. Discusses content of the reviewed literature by means of abstracts and discussion.

PERI 680. Clinical Periodontics. 1-5 Hours.

Semester course; 160 clinic sessions. Variable for 1-5 credits. Must be taking both fall and spring of the first, second and third years of the program for 5 credits each semester. May be taken in additional semesters as needed to complete clinical training; credit will vary based on circumstances. Provides supervised training in periodontics. Provides the student with the experience in the treatment and management of patients with various types and severities of periodontal diseases. Emphasizes diagnosis, treatment planning, prognosis, scaling and root planning, non-surgical and surgical techniques. Provides experience in the treatment of advanced periodontal cases and more complex surgical techniques including preprosthetic, orthodontic, periodontal plastic and mucogingival procedures, guided tissue regeneration, guided bone regeneration and implant surgical techniques. Graded P/F.

PERI 700. Advanced Periodontal Selective. 1.5 Hour.

Yearlong course; 15 seminar and 25 clinical hours. 1.5 credits. Prerequisites: successful completion of all prior courses in periodontics and permission of the course director. This course is offered to dental students who demonstrate high academic achievement and are interested in expanding their practical knowledge and experience in periodontal surgical procedures. It is designed to enhance the general dentist’s knowledge regarding indications, diagnosis and treatment planning of periodontal surgical procedures and to provide hands-on experience in applying techniques of surgical periodontal procedures suitable for judicious use in general dental practice. Students receive CO grading in the fall and a pass or fail grade and earned credit in the spring.

PERI 719. Specialty Practice Management. 0.5 Hours.

Semester course; 22 seminar hours. 0.5 credit. Must be taken for two consecutive semesters. Provides the student with experience in office management. Requires visits to specialty offices to familiarize the student with contemporary modes of practice administration and patient management.

PERI 733. Surgical Periodontal Therapy. 1 Hour.

1 credit. The fourth in a four-part series of didactic courses designed to prepare the dental student for the clinical diagnosis and management of periodontal diseases. Through this course, students will complete their didactic exploration of periodontal diseases with a conceptual knowledge of surgical treatment options for periodontal diseases. Enrollment is restricted to admitted dental students.

PERI 739. Clinical Periodontics III. 5 Hours.

Yearlong course; clinical contact hours. 5 credits. The primary objective of the department is to provide an educational experience that will enable the dental student to meet the periodontal needs of present and future patients. These objectives necessitate student awareness of the biology of the periodontium and pathology of gingival and periodontal diseases; the ability to examine, diagnose and develop a treatment plan for the patient with significant periodontal disease; and an understanding of the implications of periodontal diagnosis and treatment on the oral and general health of the patient. The student should also be competent in plaque control, scaling, root planing and other procedures ordinarily included in presurgical phases of therapy. The student should be familiar with the entire scope of periodontal therapy, understanding the rationale and indications for surgical treatment and anticipated results.

PERI 749. Clinical Periodontics IV. 1 Hour.

Yearlong course; 1 clinic session per week. 1 credit. This final clinical course in periodontics provides competency assessment of the dental student as an entry-level dentist in the diagnosis and management of patients with periodontal diseases. Students receive CO grading in the fall and a pass or fail grade and earned credit in the spring.

School of Education

Administration and Supervision (ADMS)

ADMS 500. Workshops in Education. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits, repeatable for maximum of six credits. Designed to focus on a single topic within a curriculum area, the workshop offers graduate students exposure to new information strategies and materials in the context of a flexible instructional framework. Activities emphasize a hands-on approach with direct application to the educational setting.

ADMS 600. Public School Administration. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An overview of the theory and practice of public school administration. Emphasis on the governance of education and leadership roles of school boards, superintendents, principals and supervisors. Leadership theories and characteristics of effective management systems related to student discipline and academic performance, school safety, internal and external communications, and coordination with outside agencies. Appropriate field-based project relating theory to practice will be required.

ADMS 601. Processes of Instructional Leadership. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines processes of instructional leadership in schools. Primary focus on developing school leadership skills necessary to provide a positive working environment through collaboration and team-building, as well as professional opportunities including supervision and evaluation of instruction. Focus will be on best practices that lead to school cultures that build communities of learning. Appropriate field-based project relating theory to practice will be required.

ADMS 602. Seminar in Elementary School Administration. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Problems and issues in elementary school leadership. Major responsibilities of the elementary school principal. Enrollment limited to specialists in administration.

ADMS 603. Seminar in Secondary School Administration. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Problems and issues in secondary school leadership. Major responsibilities of the secondary school principal. Enrollment limited to specialists in administration.

ADMS 605. Organizational Theory, Structure and Culture in Educational Settings. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of organizational theory, structure and culture relating to schools. Emphasis on conceptual understandings needed for practical implementation.

ADMS 606. Organizational Behavior and Change in Educational Settings. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of organizational concepts and practices in educational contexts. Emphasis on both conceptual understandings and specific professional skills relating to diagnosis and development.

ADMS 607. Principles of Educational Leadership. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Develop understandings for school leaders of effective leadership in organizations, personal leadership styles and modifying leadership styles. Leadership with respect to vision building, organizational communications, motivating others and group problem solving will serve as major areas of study. Lecture, individual study, group work and fieldwork will serve as major means of course delivery.

ADMS 610. School and Community Relations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides a conceptual and philosophical framework for evaluation and development