Lisa M. Abrams, Ph.D.
Associate professor and interim chair

The Department of Foundations of Education is committed to preparing educators and scholars for critical, reflective and responsible work in education, enhancing the knowledge base in the varied disciplines through research and scholarship, and engaging in service to the broader community. 

To fulfill this mission, the department offers multidisciplinary perspectives that are the pillars for School of Education programs, based on the contention that the preparation of effective educational practitioners and scholars requires deep understanding of the broader perspectives that are represented by research and theory in psychological, cultural, philosophical, historical and ethical areas of inquiry. Learn more by visiting the Foundations of Education webpage.

EDUS 500. Workshop in Education. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. Repeatable to 6 credits. Designed to focus on a single topic within a curriculum area, the workshop offers graduate students exposure to new information strategies and materials in the context of a flexible instructional framework. Activities emphasize a hands-on approach with direct application to the educational setting.

EDUS 514. Parent-child Relations. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A methods course in parent-child communications and problem solving. Designed to enable parents and professionals to understand and relate more effectively with children.

EDUS 594. Topical Seminar. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. A seminar intended for group study by students interested in examining topics, issues or problems related to teaching and learning.

EDUS 601. Philosophy of Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of basic philosophies that have contributed to the present-day educational system. Attention will be given to contemporary philosophies and their impact on educational aims and methods.

EDUS 602. Adolescent Growth and Development. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Contemporary learning theories and their implications for teaching the adolescent learner. Emphasis will be placed on specific problems of adolescent growth and development as they relate to the learning situation.

EDUS 603. Seminar in Child Growth and Development. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Intensive study of child growth and development and application of this knowledge. Emphasis on current research.

EDUS 604. Adult Development. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An introductory study of adult development from the life cycle perspective with implications for educators working with adults. Emphasis will be placed on major physiological, psychological, sociological, and anthropological factors that make adults distinct from earlier developmental levels.

EDUS 605. Child and Adolescent Development. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines theory and practical applications of the research about the cognitive, social and physical development of children and adolescents. Emphasizes issues that affect students in school environments.

EDUS 606. Review of Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Application of research findings to a specific educational area of study. Emphasis is on the consumption and utilization of research findings rather than the production of research evidence.

EDUS 607. Advanced Educational Psychology for Elementary Teachers. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Application of the principles of psychology to the teaching-learning process in the elementary classroom. Discussion will focus on the comprehensive development of individual learning experiences and educational programs from the point of view of the educator and administrator. Crosslisted as: PSYC 607.

EDUS 608. Educational Statistics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: STAT 508 or equivalent. An intermediate-level statistics class focusing primarily on techniques of inferential analysis. The purpose of this course is to facilitate students' development of the skills required to come up with a research hypothesis and analyze data to confirm or deny said hypothesis. Students will conduct data analysis using the National Center for Education Statistics Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002. Students will specifically consider the development of theoretically grounded hypotheses and the use of a variety of statistical techniques to enable their testing. The class will focus in particular on multiple regression with two or more independent variables and the psychometric analysis of measurement scales intended to tap variables used in the models developed. Students will also consider curvilinear relationships, factor analysis and power analysis. Students who successfully complete the course should have the ability to analyze complex data sets and construct measures that enable the testing of hypotheses that advance theory, research and practice in the field of education.

EDUS 609. Learning and Motivation in Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines perspectives on learning and motivation in school settings.

EDUS 610. Social Foundations of Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of significant social issues involved in the development and operation of schools and other educational institutions and processes.

EDUS 612. Education and the World's Future. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An examination of education as it relates to future changes in other areas: population, energy, transportation, family, etc. The course will consist of readings dealing with educational change as well as a series of modules where students will engage in future exercises, games and projects.

EDUS 613. Educational Change. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Developing the skills for planned program change through the use of systematic inquiry, systems analysis and systems approaches through systems concepts. Provides opportunities for students to develop "mini (classroom) changes" or "macro (school district) changes" through the use of systems.

EDUS 614. Contemporary Educational Thought. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course will be devoted to a critical examination of educational ideas and programs emanating from contemporary writings on education. Students will be encouraged to develop critical skills of analysis in examining such writings utilizing historical and philosophical perspectives.

EDUS 615. Lifespan Development: A Gender Perspective. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Overview of human development theories and the impact of cultural gender messages on the developmental process. Crosslisted as: CLED 615.

EDUS 617. Advanced Educational Psychology for Secondary Teachers. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Application of the principles of psychology to the teaching-learning process in the secondary classroom. Discussion will focus on the comprehensive development of individual learning experiences and educational programs from the point of view of the educator and administrator. Crosslisted as: PSYC 657.

EDUS 620. Human Development in Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Doctoral seminar that examines issues in human development as they relate to the education of youth and young adults.

EDUS 621. Motivation in Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Doctoral seminar that examines issues in motivation as they relate to teaching and learning.

EDUS 631. American College and University. 3 Hours.

3 credits. Examines historical and contemporary foundations of American higher education through the study of leading developments and of contemporary issues relating to the curriculum, aims and objectives and current directions of American colleges, universities and other institutional settings of higher education. Crosslisted as: CLED 631.

EDUS 632. The Changing Face of Higher Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines how higher education is changing and explores the reasons for these changes; studies how the academy is responding to social pressures and explores scenarios for future change. Crosslisted as: ADLT 632.

EDUS 633. Academic Leadership in Higher Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Analyzes how leadership in higher education is similar to and different from leadership in other organizational settings; explores challenges for leadership (such as access, cost and social responsiveness) and examines emerging leadership roles at various levels of the academic organization. Crosslisted as: CLED 633.

EDUS 641. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1-6 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Determination of the amount of credit and permission of the instructor and department chair must be procured prior to registration. Cannot be used in place of existing courses. An individual study of a specialized issue or problem in education.

EDUS 651. Topics in Education. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. May be repeated for 9 credits. Check with department for specific prerequisites. A course for the examination of specialized issues, topics, readings or problems in education.

EDUS 660. Research Methods in Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Designed to provide an introductory understanding of educational research and evaluation studies. Emphasizes fundamental concepts, procedures and processes appropriate for use in basic, applied and developmental research. Includes developing skills in critical analysis of research studies. Analyzes the assumptions, uses and limitations of different research designs. Explores methodological and ethical issues of educational research. Students either conduct or design a study in their area of educational specialization.

EDUS 661. Educational Evaluation: Models and Designs. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EDUS 660 or permission of instructor. A comprehensive review of the major evaluation theories and models including their focus, assumptions, designs, methodologies and audiences in educational policy making and program development. Designed for students to gain an understanding of alternative procedures of educational evaluation, an in-depth knowledge of at least one theoretical approach to evaluation and skills in interpretation of evaluation studies for policy and in developing an evaluation design for their area of specialization.

EDUS 662. Educational Measurement and Evaluation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides an understanding of basic concepts of educational measurement and evaluation. Includes development, interpretation and use of norm-referenced and criterion-referenced measures, standardized instruments and qualitative assessments applicable to a wide variety of educational programs and settings. Students study in-depth measurement and/or evaluation procedures in their specialization.

EDUS 672. Internship. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1-6 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of adviser. Study and integration of theory with practice in clinical or off-campus settings supervised by an approved professional and university faculty. May include seminars, selected readings, projects and other activities designed and evaluated by supervising faculty.

EDUS 673. Seminar on Educational Issues, Ethics and Policy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An analysis of the ethical dimensions of educational policies and practices. Examines aspects of selected educational policies and practices, drawn in part from practical issues encountered in clinical settings. Investigates how educational policies and practices reflect ethical values and how those values are grounded.

EDUS 701. Urban Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of urban education from historical and contemporary perspectives. This course includes study of the educative effect of urban environments; the development of public and private urban educational systems; the influence of social, political, and economic factors on urban educational programs; and the impact of theories, proposals, and practices on alternative futures.

EDUS 702. Foundations of Educational Research and Doctoral Scholarship I. 3 Hours.

3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This interdisciplinary seminar is the first part of a two-semester sequence. Students will learn about the nature of scholarly inquiry and the worth of situating research within its wider social and political contexts. Course will deal with limitations of knowledge and knowing and aid students in understanding major themes in the field of epistemology. Emphasis will be given to the nature and structure of knowledge and evidence, justification of beliefs, beliefs about "truth," naturalized epistemology and the role of skepticism in inquiry and advanced study. EDUS 702 and 703 are continuous courses.

EDUS 703. Foundations of Educational Research and Doctoral Scholarship II. 3 Hours.

3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EDUS 702. This interdisciplinary semester is the second part of a two-semester sequence. Students will deepen their understanding of scientific inquiry and apply an understanding of epistemology to a critical analysis of various philosophies of research and paradigms that exist (e.g.: positivism, constructivism, etc.). Emphasis will be placed on the relationships among research, politics, policy and ethics. Examples will be drawn from research on urban issues and deal with issues such as race, class and gender in education. EDUS 702 and 703 are continuous courses.

EDUS 706. Educational Theory and Praxis in Historical and Contemporary Contexts. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This seminar focuses on philosophies of education with particular attention paid to ways of thinking about seminal ideas and their relationships to education and social, institutional, economic and cultural change in the U.S. It considers how broader social phenomena affect the purposes and structures of educational institutions as well as how educational change affects wider society. Additionally, it highlights challenges for social change within and through public schools given institutional, social and political influences. Key topics include: schooling for democracy; progressivism, pragmatism and education; eco-education; behaviorism and social utopias; multiculturalism/pluralism; contemporary political educational discourse; and the roles of theory/philosophy in education. This course offers opportunity for students to engage with theories of social change that place education/schooling at the center. It provides space for students to develop a philosophical framework for their work as well as a means to deepen their understandings of educational research, policy and theory. Finally, this course requires students to begin to put their ideas into action in educational and other social contexts by means of a community engagement/organization component. The worth of engaging with and not just learning about the curriculum, culture and change is a core value of the program and in this course we will work hard to both study about and participate in the overlapping worlds of theory/academia and education-related social action.

EDUS 707. Socio-cultural Perspectives on Schooling, Society and Change. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This seminar focuses on the critical analysis of contemporary schooling in the U.S. and investigates how educational institutions work from a sociological-cultural perspective. The structure of schooling is analyzed through such topics as the social organization of schooling, stratification within and among schools, youth culture and student peer groups, curriculum and the stratification of knowledge, and equality of educational opportunity as mitigated by such factors as social class, race, ethnicity and gender. Discussions about current social theories and debates in education are combined with lessons drawn from social justice-based research on the politics of schooling and institutional transformation. In sum, the course provides a framework for informed participation in debates on controversial educational issues at the macro level, including school reform and educational policy, thereby equipping future curriculum and instruction leaders with the tools they need to affect change.

EDUS 710. Quantitative Research Design. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: EDUS 660 or equivalent, and a graduate-level statistics course, or permission of instructor. An examination of quantitative research designs and concepts commonly utilized in conducting research in applied educational settings. Fundamental principles of research are extended to cover such topics as quasi-experimental and nested designs, experimental validity and alignment of statistical procedures with designs.

EDUS 711. Qualitative Methods and Analysis. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: graduate-level statistics course, and EDUS 660 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Examines qualitative research designs and inductive analysis, including research traditions, problems formulation in fieldwork, purposeful sampling, interactive data collection strategies, research reliability and validity. An interdisciplinary approach is used. Students conduct a small field study in their specialization.

EDUS 712. Mixed Methods Research. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: graduate-level statistics course, EDUS 660 and EDUS 711 or equivalents, or permission of instructor. Examines mixed methods research designs, including the major philosophical perspectives of mixed methodology, as well as the challenges and strategies for data collection and analysis procedures across designs.

EDUS 720. Seminar in Cognition and School Learning. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines topics in cognition that explain students' learning such as expertise, problem solving, cognitive strategies instruction and development of the knowledge base. Supportive instructional techniques will also be considered.

EDUS 721. Advanced Seminar in Social Processes in Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines the theoretical/conceptual and empirical bases of various social processes and their relationship to educational outcomes. The content covered is designed to provide students with a survey of literature and research on a number of topics that examine these relationships from individual, contextual/environmental and policy perspectives. Current developments with regard to research methodologies in these areas will also be considered.

EDUS 790. Educational Research Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides doctoral students with opportunities to investigate research areas related to their doctoral studies. Students and instructor will critique student conducted literature reviews and preliminary research proposals.

EDUS 795. Professional Seminar in Educational Issues. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Limited to students in Ph.D. in Education program. Interactive seminar discusses contemporary educational issues based on research in the historical, philosophical, psychological, sociological, political and economic foundations of education. Includes active participation by students as well as guest lectures by scholars from various academic disciplines.

EDUS 797. Directed Research. 1-9 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-9 credits. Prerequisite: completion of first-year Ph.D. courses in education or permission of program director. The course provides doctoral students the opportunity to do hands-on research prior to the dissertation project that is relevant to their substantive area or individual learning needs. The topic and specific project will be initiated by the student and implemented in collaboration with a School of Education faculty member. A proposal for a directed research course must be submitted that specifies how the student will gain experience, knowledge and skills in one or more aspects of conducting a research project. Graded S/U/F.

EDUS 890. Dissertation Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of director of doctoral studies. Designed to develop and refine the skills applicable to the preparation of an acceptable draft of a dissertation prospectus. Crosslisted as: EDLP 890.