Graduate information

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/graduate/school-business/graduate-information/

...to the Master of Arts in Economics, Master...Studies in Business Office, 301 W. Franklin St...

Extended Teacher Preparation Program

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/graduate/school-education/extended-teacher-preparation-program/

...institutions may meet liberal arts and sciences requirements...101 , EDUS 300 , EDUS 301 or equivalent course...

Core curriculum

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/undergraduate-study/core-curriculum/

...for Business 3 SCMA 301 Business Statistics I...for School of the Arts programs only (three...

VCU ASPiRE

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/division-community-engagement/vcu-aspire/

...contains state-of-the-art classrooms, meeting rooms...final three courses, CMST 301 , CMST 400 and...

Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness, Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/government-public-affairs/homeland-security-emergency-preparedness-ba/

William V. Pelfrey, Ph.D. Associate professor and program chair Emergency preparedness has always been a critical aspect of governmental policy at the federal, state and local levels. Response to natural disasters — floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, outbreak of infectious disease — requires predisaster planning, mid-disaster operations and postdisaster reconstruction that can only be carried out successfully through a partnership between all levels of government and between the public sector, private sector and civil society. Since the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks in New York, Virginia and Pennsylvania the concept of emergency preparedness has been expanded to include the task of homeland security — protecting the U.S. from terrorist-caused disasters. Policy planners and operational responders at all levels of government who had previously focused upon natural disasters now have the added responsibility of preparing for and mitigating the effects of politically inspired terrorist violence. The program in homeland security and emergency preparedness recognizes this dual nature and is designed to give students both theoretical and practical knowledge that will prepare them for the following: 1) private- or public-sector employment in the expanding area of homeland security as it relates specifically to international and domestic security, as well as emergency preparedness for both security and nonsecurity-related incidents and/or 2) further study in government, international affairs, law enforcement, policy planning or law. Students will study homeland security and emergency preparedness from a number of perspectives: emergency planning/management principles and practicalities; the nature and effects of natural disasters; the nature of the terrorist threat to the U.S. from both foreign and domestic organizations, including terrorist motives, methods and history; counterterrorism policies ranging from law enforcement to intelligence to the use of military force; vulnerability assessment of public and private infrastructure and institutions; critical infrastructure protection; ethical, constitutional, law enforcement and civil liberties issues related to the prevention of terrorist attacks through surveillance, immigration restrictions and detention; public safety legal questions that arise during governmental responses to natural disaster; intelligence analysis of domestic and international threats; and policy-making topics, such as organizational design and management, interagency processes, and intergovernmental coordination and cooperation within emergency preparedness and counterterrorism institutions at the local, state, federal and international level. The knowledge and skills acquired through this course of study will enable students to continue their studies at law school or graduate school in a number of areas: business, criminal justice, geography, international affairs, political science, public administration, sociology and urban planning. Students also will be able to pursue employment opportunities in various fields, such as within the government at the local, state and federal level in homeland security and emergency planning/response; law enforcement; intelligence; for-profit and nonprofit research and consultancy; and private sector employment with any business that requires emergency planning expertise to protect critical infrastructure. Learning outcomes Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following: Analytical concepts and skills Students will achieve comprehension of the theory and practice of homeland security and emergency preparedness and be able to analyze policy and synthesize information in four key areas: risk and vulnerability analysis, strategic planning dilemmas of disasters and disaster preparedness, institutional coordination and intelligence operations, and legal/constitutional aspects, specifically: Concepts and methodologies for risk and vulnerability assessment of public and private infrastructure and institutions to natural disasters and terrorist attack ( HSEP 310 ) Critical infrastructure protection against natural disasters and terrorist attacks ( HSEP 310 ) Strategic planning within private and public sector organizations within the context of the new homeland security and emergency preparedness agendas ( HSEP 311 ) Government common goods priorities and free rider problems ( HSEP 311 ) Business and government continuity measures ( HSEP 311 ) Intelligence analysis of domestic and international threats ( HSEP 320 ) Policy making topics such as organizational design and management, interagency processes, and intergovernmental coordination and cooperation within counterterrorism and emergency management institutions at the local, state, federal, and international level ( HSEP 320 ) Ethical, constitutional, law enforcement, and civil liberties issues related to prevention of terrorist attacks through surveillance, immigration restrictions, and detention ( HSEP 330 ) Ethical, constitutional, law enforcement, and civil liberties issues related to arrest and prosecution of terrorist suspects ( HSEP 330 ) public safety legal questions that arise during governmental responses to natural disaster ( HSEP 330 ) Homeland security and emergency preparedness Students will achieve comprehension of the theoretical and practical principles of emergency preparedness for both natural disasters and terrorist incidents and be able to analyze key topics related to natural disasters, emergency planning, terrorism, and counterterrorism, specifically: Emergency planning/management principles and practicalities for an all-hazard approach to emergency preparedness ( HSEP 101 ,  HSEP 302 ) The nature and effects of natural disasters — emerging diseases, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes, for example ( HSEP 101 ,  HSEP 302 ) The nature of the terrorist threat to the United States from both foreign and domestic organizations, including terrorist motives, methods, and history ( HSEP 301 ) Counterterrorism policies ranging from law enforcement to intelligence to the use of military force ( HSEP 301 ) Research and policy analysis Students will perform research, policy analysis, and risk assessment using several methodological and theoretical approaches to homeland security and emergency preparedness, specifically: Researching topics in homeland security and emergency preparedness ( HSEP 301 ,  HSEP 302 ,  HSEP 310 ,  HSEP 311 ,  HSEP 320 ,  HSEP 330 ,  HSEP 490 ) Preparing case studies of emergency incidents and governmental responses ( HSEP 302 ,  HSEP 310 ,  HSEP 311 ,  HSEP 320 ) Preparing analyses of legal questions and cases related to homeland security and emergency preparedness ( HSEP 330 ) Knowledge of government Students will demonstrate a basic knowledge of the workings of the American government and the international system, specifically: The functions of American national institutions, state, and local institutions ( POLI 103 ) International institutions, the behavior of nations states, international political, social, military, and economic trends ( POLI 105 ) Oral and written presentation Students will develop advanced skills in expository writing and oral presentation, specifically: Completion of a large project outlining, evaluating, and illustrating the dilemmas facing emergency management officials in preparation for a to a role playing simulation ( HSEP 490 ) Writing an executive summary ( HSEP 490 ) Presenting an oral briefing ( HSEP 301 ,  HSEP 490 ) Role-playing simulation Students will participate in a role playing simulation and be able to evaluate policy problems they face and develop policy responses, specifically: Preparation for and participation in a role playing simulation of an emergency situation ( HSEP 490 ) Evaluation Students will also be able to evaluate scholarly and practitioner analyses of homeland security and emergency preparedness, specifically: Written and oral evaluation of several books/reports on homeland security and emergency preparedness ( HSEP 490 ) Collateral requirements In addition to the homeland security and emergency preparedness courses required for the Bachelor of Arts degree, students must complete the study of a foreign language through the intermediate level (202 or 205) through courses or placement. As a prerequisite for HSEP 310 , STAT 210 should be used to fulfill general education requirements for statistics. Honors in homeland security and emergency preparedness Homeland security and emergency preparedness majors can earn honors within the program by completing HSEP 490 with an A grade and graduating with an overall 3.0 GPA and a 3.3 GPA in courses credited toward the 36 credits of the homeland security and emergency preparedness major.

Bioinformatics, Master of Science (M.S.)

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/graduate/vcu-life-sciences/center-study-biological-complexity/bioinformatics-ms/

...research project, work of art, thesis or dissertation...chemistry (e.g. CHEM 301 ), cell biology (e...

Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) with a concentration in art education

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/arts/art-education/arts-bfa-concentration-art-education/

The Bachelor of Fine Arts in Arts with a concentration in art education is an approved teacher preparation program that complies with the professional standards of the Virginia Department of Education and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. It is further accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education and the National Association of Schools of Art and Design. All of these agencies assure the highest professional program standards. Graduates of the program are eligible for Virginia teacher licensure to teach art in pre-kindergarten through grade 12. Learning outcomes Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following: Students will develop a professional philosophical position about the relevance and importance of art education. Students will implement/acquire a variety of art instructional strategies that reflect an understanding of the artistic, cognitive, emotional and social development of children as well as national, state and local curricular standards and assessment techniques in order to meet the needs of diverse learners. Students will be able to create and adapt learning environments that address the needs of all students. Students will be able to design assessment methods to measure student knowledge and skills, improve student learning and further professional practice. Students will teach art in ways that engage traditional and contemporary artists (diverse in regards to gender, ethnicity, sexual identity, social class and other dimensions of identity). Students will seek internships, service-learning positions and local, national and international experiences that lead to research and deepen engagement with diverse communities.

Interior Design, Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.)

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/arts/interior-design/interior-design-bfa/

The Department of Interior Design, accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation, provides the breadth of a university education with the depth of a professional curriculum. The curriculum provides for the study of space, form, color and light in collaboration with the pragmatic investigation of building codes, materials, finishes, construction methods and business practices. An important focus also is placed on the study of design theory and the history of interior environments. All of these areas are synthesized in the curriculum to provide learning of the overall context of the built interior environment. Graduates are prepared with the skills and knowledge that can facilitate the student’s transition into an entry-level interior design position at a successful firm or corporation, or entry into programs of advanced study. The department also prepares students with the skills and knowledge that will allow for lifelong learning and professional development in the design industry. Prospective students are encouraged to review the School of the Arts undergraduate admissions website as well as the Art Foundation Program website. Learning outcomes Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following: Students will demonstrate professional values. The students will demonstrate professional values that address client and user needs in response to the built environment, professional ethics, environmental ethics and the role of sustainability in the practice of interior design. Students will demonstrate an understanding of a global perspective approach to thinking and problem-solving (viewing design with awareness and respect for cultural and social differences of people; understanding issues that affect the sustainability of the planet; understanding of the implications of conducting the practice of design within a world market). Students will demonstrate critical and analytical thinking, creative thinking, and the ability to think visually and volumetrically. Students will demonstrate professional discipline (i.e., time management, organizational skills) and active listening skills. Students will understand the importance of community and public service. Student work will demonstrate design fundamentals. Students will demonstrate knowledge of design fundamentals including design elements and principles, color principles, theories and systems, theories of design and composition, and principles and theories of lighting design. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the theories of human behavior in the built environment including human factors (ergonomics, anthropometrics), the relationship between human behavior and the built environment, and an understanding of the principles of sustainability. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the history of art, architecture and design. Student work will demonstrate knowledge of interior design. Students will demonstrate knowledge and application of the design process and two- and three-dimensional design elements and principles in the development of the spatial envelope. Student work will demonstrate programming skills, including problem identification, identification of client and user needs, and information gathering research and analysis (functional requirements, code research, sustainability issues, etc.). Student work will demonstrate competent schematic design, concept development and problem-solving (concept statements, conceptual drawings, space planning). Student work will demonstrate competent design development skills (selection of finishes and materials; furniture selection and plan, plans, elevations, sketches, and study models; luminaires and lighting sources; design justification solutions in relation to the program and concept; appropriate selection and application of decorative architectural elements). Student work will demonstrate competent skills in preparing drawings, schedules and specifications as an integrated system in a single project. Student work should demonstrate an understanding of appropriate selection and application of art and accessories, the ability to custom design interior elements, way-finding methods and graphic identification. Student work must demonstrate understanding that design solutions affect and are impacted by building systems and interior materials. Students must demonstrate understanding of the impact of laws, codes, regulations, standards and practices that protect the health, safety and welfare of the public. Student work will demonstrate effective communication. Student work will demonstrate competence in drafting and lettering, both manual and computer-aided techniques; illustrative drawing; and presentation of color, materials and furnishings. Students must express ideas clearly in oral presentations and critiques; communicate clearly in writing of specifications, schedules, and contracts and other business-related documents, such as project programs, concept statements, reports, research papers, resumes and correspondence. Student work must demonstrate the student’s ability to successfully render the design intent using two- and three-dimensional methods (manual and computer-aided). Students will demonstrate a foundation in business and professional practices. Students will demonstrate understanding of project management (estimating, budget management, contract administration, information management, conflict resolution, assessment processes including post-occupancy evaluation). Students must demonstrate knowledge of licensing and registration requirements for interior designers and professional design organizations, Students must demonstrate understanding of basic business computer applications (word processing, spreadsheets) and business procedures (marketing, strategic planning). Standards of interior design Students who have successfully completed the Art Foundation Program may enter the program in the fall semester only. All applicants must submit a portfolio of work. The department uses the portfolio evaluation criteria established in the School of the Arts for initial acceptance. A second portfolio review of interior design studio work takes place at the end of the sophomore year. The faculty uses the portfolio as an advising tool to determine student placement in the program. The student’s GPA also is evaluated to determine if the student may continue in the program. The following courses must be completed at the end of the sophomore year to be eligible for continuation in the program: Students who wish to transfer into the interior design program must first apply to the Art Foundation Program for evaluation. A student must demonstrate equivalent preparation at other institutions and submit a portfolio of work for review by interior design faculty. Transfer students admitted into the program must complete all major requirements determined to be missing from their academic design experience. Students must complete the required pre- and corequisites of the program in the order presented in the curriculum outline. This structure enables students to develop knowledge and skill bases in interior design that will prepare them for upper-level interior design studio courses ( IDES 301 , IDES 302 , IDES 400 and IDES 401 ) and successful entry into the interior design profession. Students must earn a minimum 2.5 GPA on all work before entering the program, in the semester immediately before entering the major and each semester they continue in the program. Students must maintain a minimum grade of C in each studio in order to continue to the next semester of studio courses. Students are required to have a laptop computer and appropriate software upon entry into the interior design program. The department recommends a specific computer package that is used throughout the academic year. The package is updated each year because of changes in computer technology. The total cost is approximately $3,800 and financial aid is available to those who qualify. An interior design student kit also is required upon initial entry into the program; it contains a variety of drawing supplies for graphics and interior design studios. Students will receive the computer requirements and student kit requirements upon acceptance into the program. Students with experience in interior design or related fields may challenge some interior design courses based on regulations for “ Undergraduate credit by examination ” as stated in this bulletin. Students must be accepted into the interior design program and challenges are based upon demonstrated experience, portfolio work and professional years of experience. No more than nine credit hours may be challenged and the challenge may not be requested during the final semester before graduation. Courses that may be challenged include: A student majoring in interior design who does not enroll in courses in the major as a full-time student for three or more consecutive semesters (including summer) must reapply to the program, submitting a portfolio and undergoing a grade review.

Theatre, Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) with a concentration in performance

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/arts/theatre/theatre-bfa-concentration-performance/

The Department of Theatre offers a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre that may be entered into during the third year. All freshman and transfer students entering the department are initially classified as Theatre Foundation students. After successfully completing the first two years of core theatre courses in their foundation areas of emphasis, students apply for admission to a specific degree program (B.F.A. or B.A.). The department offers B.F.A concentration areas in performance and stage management; as well as three areas of design/technology: scenic, lighting and costume. (See the individual specialization/concentration pages for curricula outlines.) Student participation in both credit- and noncredit-bearing department activities may be required. Students matriculating in School of the Arts degree programs are bound by the policies and procedures stipulated in this bulletin and in any other current handbook or policy document adopted by the individual programs. Because of the environment that exists in these preprofessional programs, all aspects of theatre as art, craft, business and education are experienced together. The curriculum immerses students in the practicalities of theatre. Throughout the four years, the performer works daily with voice, body and imagination, while the designer/technician is involved in studio classes and practical application. Prospective theatre educators engage in intensive teacher-training activities that lead to certification. Learning outcomes Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following: Demonstrate skills and techniques needed to enter the profession as an actor Demonstrate knowledge of history, theory and literature and their practical application

Cinema, Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/arts/cinema-program/cinema-ba/

Robert Tregenza Program Head arts.vcu.edu/programs/undergraduate-programs/cinema-film-ba The Bachelor of Arts in Cinema is designed for students who desire a program with an emphasis in film combined with a strong liberal arts component with a second undergraduate major or double minor in fields of study other than the arts. The program focuses on the art and craft of narrative filmmaking with an emphasis on the practices of U.S. independent filmmakers. The style and content of U.S. independent film are often closely aligned with European cinema and the program offers opportunities for international study options. Internships with professional film organizations in the U.S. and abroad are available on a competitive basis. Full-time students enrolled in this program may graduate with the B.A. after three years of study by completing required course work in the summer semester following the third year. Filmmaking courses in the program, which comprise approximately one-third of the curriculum, focus on the understanding and creative use of digital film equipment. Students interested in both digital and traditional celluloid film and documentary, as well as narrative techniques, should review the school’s Bachelor of Fine Arts program in photography and film , which offers nearly two-thirds of the curriculum in film courses. Students interested in animation or experimental video should review the B.F.A. in Kinetic Imaging program. The B.A. in Cinema requires a minimum of 120 credits, including 48 in the major. At least 45 of the 120 credits must be taken as 300- to 500-level courses. Learning outcomes Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following: Operate film equipment and screenwriting, editing, scheduling and budgeting software Gain an international film perspective Create all aspects of the art of storytelling Produce narrative short films Develop creative collaborations Synthesize other disciplines with filmmaking

Painting and Printmaking, Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.)

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/arts/painting-printmaking/painting-printmaking-bfa/

Faculty and students in the Department of Painting and Printmaking work together in a professional and creative learning environment. The undergraduate curriculum enables students to adopt a specialized focus within the discipline and use elective options to pursue other areas of interest in the School of the Arts, the university and the community. It also permits students to tailor a course of study suited to their professional and personal ambitions. The undergraduate program provides students with opportunities for concentrated experiences in both practice and theory as a foundation for independent exploration and artistic development. Classroom discussions invite students to examine a range of contemporary critical issues, which enable them to understand their own studio work in relation to historical continuum. As students develop their skills in critical analysis they are challenged to articulate and justify their ideas both visually and verbally. The size and diversity of the faculty guarantee exposure to a plurality of ideas and stylistic approaches. In addition, the department's visiting artist program brings to campus leading figures in the world of contemporary art for discussions of their work, critiques of student work and workshops. Learning outcomes Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following: Students are expected to achieve technical proficiency in painting and printmaking, and possess the skill to translate their creative ideas through studio practice. Students are expected to develop personal voices as artists based on an awareness of social, historical and critical issues. Students have the ability to think critically and to articulate their ideas via conversation, public speaking and writing. Students comprehend the potential impact of contemporary art on culture.

Art History, Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) with a concentration in art historical

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/arts/art-history/art-history-ba-concentration-art-historicall/

The art historical concentration is a liberal arts program composed of an academic course of study exposing the student to the scholarship, theoretical perspectives and research methods of not only the history of art, but related disciplines in the humanities. Courses focus on cultures, historical periods and regions. The program also includes possibilities for directed research projects as well as museum internships. This curriculum provides students the best possible background for future graduate work in art history.

Art History, Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) with a concentration in architectural history

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/arts/art-history/art-history-ba-concentration-architectural-history/

Note: Admission to this program is temporarily suspended. The architectural history concentration affords the student an excellent background for graduate work in architectural history and/or art history, as well as career opportunities in the field. Courses focus on cultures, historical periods and regions. The program also includes possibilities for directed research projects as well as museum internships. Given the region’s rich and diverse architectural resources, this program provides an unusual opportunity for on-site studies. Learning outcomes Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following: Practice precise and thorough observation Write and speak effectively about art and architecture Acquire knowledge of key monuments, artists and art movements in the history of art Conduct research using art historical methods

Dance and Choreography, Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) with a concentration in performance/Richmond Ballet

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/arts/dance-choreography/dance-choreography-bfa-performance-concentration-richmond-ballet/

VCU’s Department of Dance and Choreography offers a four-year degree concentration within the B.F.A. specifically designed for Richmond Ballet trainees. This unique program bridges trainee experience with the Richmond Ballet professional company and rigorous pre-professional training with a focus in modern/contemporary dance. During the first two years, students receive VCU credit for their work at the Richmond Ballet while taking general education courses, dance history and improvisation at VCU. Students then complete the degree with two years at VCU, taking courses in modern/contemporary dance, ballet, composition, dance science, teaching methods and more. There are many opportunities to perform throughout the four years. This B.F.A. program is designed for disciplined students who are interested in attaining versatility in both ballet and modern/contemporary dance while exploring creative, historical and global perspectives of the field. A very small number of students in this degree program are offered the opportunity to join Richmond Ballet II after their first two years. Students are encouraged to discuss professional and academic plans with their advisers should this occur. Learning outcomes Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following: Students must demonstrate proficiency in improvisation, composition, choreography and related art forms that encourage creativity and an individual point of view. Students must demonstrate proficiency in modern dance and a diverse range of other dance techniques. The objective is to maximize students’ potential to become versatile dancers of technical excellence. Students must demonstrate a global and historical perspective of dance as an art form with an emphasis on contemporary approaches to dance making and performance. Students must demonstrate writing and critical-thinking skills. Students must demonstrate comprehensive and theoretical understanding of the field.

Fashion, Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.) with a concentration in fashion design

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/arts/fashion-design-merchandising/fashion-bfa-concentration-fashion-design/

The fashion design curriculum offers technical and design courses that provide skills required in the fashion industry. Individual designs are presented in two-dimensional form, developed and perfected through techniques used in the fashion industry, and then executed in final and three-dimensional form in fabrics appropriate to the design. Junior design students are encouraged to complete internships in the fashion industry in New York City. Internships provide not only experience but industry contacts, and are strongly recommended. They may be conducted primarily during the summer semester. Study abroad programs are readily available for fashion design majors. Learning outcomes Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following: Utilize problem-solving skills: Apply investigative and research skills in the completion of studio projects Implement industry-standard computer technology Demonstrate professional visual and oral presentation skills Understand the global nature of the fashion industry

Fashion, Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) with a concentration in fashion merchandising

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/arts/fashion-design-merchandising/fashion-ba-concentration-fashion-merchandising/

The major in fashion merchandising requires a strong background in marketing, business and specialized professional courses with an emphasis on globalism. Students are directed toward assignments that will develop their skills in research, writing, presentation and critical thinking. Graduates find career opportunities in fashion forecasting, product development, advertising and promotion, retail management, buying, and international marketing. Internships provide not only experience but industry contacts, and are strongly recommended. They may be conducted primarily during the summer semester. Study abroad programs are readily available for fashion merchandising majors. Learning outcomes Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following: Implement technical skills: The program will provide students with technical knowledge and skills of contemporary computer software. Utilize problem-solving: Apply quantitative and qualitative skills to problem-solving within the apparel industry. Students will be familiar with the various levels of the fashion industry, and understand how the different business levels and segments intersect. Students will have knowledge of numerous occupations in the fashion industry. Understand the fashion industry and its occupations: Students will understand the workings of the wholesale segment of the fashion industry including market segmentation, buyer behavior and career opportunities. Numerous simulations and outside evaluators will be used. Understand the wholesale industry: Students will understand how theoretical perspectives on markets, trade and economic development can be applied to historical and current data on production, consumption and trade. Understand global economics: Students will understand how theoretical perspectives on markets, trade and economic development can be applied to historical and current data on production, consumption and trade. Application of the design principles: Students will successfully apply the elements and principles of design to various fashion-related projects and presentations. Knowledge of the theory of contemporary fashion: Students will be aware of the historical significance of fashion in contemporary history. Application of merchandising math: Students will demonstrate understanding of the fashion buyer’s job with regard to merchandise planning and control.

Economics, Bachelor of Science (B.S.) [School of Business]

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/business/economics/economics-bs/

...MKTG 301 Marketing Principles 3 SCMA 301 Business...unique blend of liberal arts and business. Therefore...

Electrical Engineering, Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/engineering/electrical-computer-engineering/electrical-engineering-bs/

...Engineering Programming 3 MATH 301 Differential Equations 3...satisfies approved humanities/fine arts) 3 Select one...

Computer Engineering, Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/engineering/electrical-computer-engineering/computer-engineering-bs/

...3 Approved humanities/fine arts 3 Approved natural...Mathematical Structures 3 MATH 301 Differential Equations 3...

Biomedical Engineering, Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/engineering/biomedical-engineering/biomedical-engineering-bs/

...conducting state-of-the-art research needed to...EGRB 101 and EGRB 301 , which involves biomedical...

English, Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/college-humanities-sciences/english/english-ba/

The Bachelor of Arts program in English requires a minimum of 120 credits, with at least 33 upper-level (numbered 300 to 499) credits in the major. Six of the 33 credits may be taken in upper-level foreign literature read in the original language or upper-level foreign literature in English translation (FLET). UNIV 111 and UNIV 112 (or equivalent) and a 200-level literature course (or equivalent) do not count toward the major. English majors must take a minimum of nine credits at the 400 level, including the senior seminar, ENGL 499 . Students may expect 300-level courses in the department to emphasize historical breadth, while 400-level courses will offer in-depth focus. ENGL 410 - ENGL 414 , ENGL 480 - ENGL 485 and ENGL 499 will include British, American or other literatures (world, transatlantic, etc.). For specific topics, see the Schedule of Classes; majors are encouraged to choose 400-level courses from more than one literary tradition (British, American, other literatures). Learning outcomes Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following: Read closely a wide variety of texts from diverse traditions and recognize how texts are shaped by historical, geographical and generic contexts. Write clearly and effective compositions that reflect their understanding of literary genres, critical perspectives and rhetorical purposes.  Employ various strategies for research in order to write persuasive essays.

Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) with a concentration in health and science

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/college-humanities-sciences/gender-sexuality-womens-studies/gender-sexuality-womens-studies-ba-concentration-health-science/

Learning outcomes Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following: Be conversant in feminist epistemology Analyze through a feminist lens the social, cultural, artistic, literary, historical, economic, political and scientific forces and accomplishments that shape the lived experiences of women and people of diverse sexualities and genders Display a working knowledge of online databases and library resources requisite to conducting contemporary and archival research Analyze data, refute bias and exercise informed judgment in problem-solving related to the lives of diverse people and to issues of social justice Synthesize information and formulate clearly articulated arguments Integrate complex thoughts into written and spoken discourse Present clear, organized and coherent arguments as demonstrated through oral and written assignments Be conversant in the ethical dimensions of gender, sexuality and women’s issues Critique civic engagement from a feminist perspective Display a working knowledge of social injustice and advocacy Understand feminist theorizing across disciplinary and cultural contexts for both methodology and epistemology and analyze and evaluate problems and questions by applying the intersection of knowledge, gender, race, class, culture, power and knower influence Identify and comprehend issues of social justice, and analyze their effects on gender and sexual minorities, and women and girls in the U.S. and around the world

Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, Bachelor of Arts (B.A.)

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/college-humanities-sciences/gender-sexuality-womens-studies/gender-sexuality-womens-studies-ba/

Be conversant in feminist epistemology Analyze through a feminist lens the social, cultural, artistic, literary, historical, economic, political and scientific forces and accomplishments that shape the lived experiences of women and people of diverse sexualities and genders Display a working knowledge of online databases and library resources requisite to conducting contemporary and archival research Analyze data, refute bias and exercise informed judgment in problem-solving related to the lives of diverse people and to issues of social justice Synthesize information and formulate clearly articulated arguments Integrate complex thoughts into written and spoken discourse Present clear, organized and coherent arguments as demonstrated through oral and written assignments Be conversant in the ethical dimensions of gender, sexuality and women’s issues Critique civic engagement from a feminist perspective Display a working knowledge of social injustice and advocacy Understand feminist theorizing across disciplinary and cultural contexts for both methodology and epistemology and analyze and evaluate problems and questions by applying the intersection of knowledge, gender, race, class, culture, power and knower influence Identify and comprehend issues of social justice, and analyze their effects on gender and sexual minorities, and women and girls in the U.S. and around the world

Philosophy, Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) with a concentration in ethics and public policy

http://bulletin.vcu.edu/undergraduate/college-humanities-sciences/philosophy/philosophy-ba-concentration-ethics-public-policy/

The Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy requires a minimum of 120 credits, with at least 30 of those credits in philosophy. Fifteen of these credits must be selected from upper-level philosophy courses. Students whose main interests in philosophy are ethics, political philosophy, philosophy of law or public policy (and who may wish to pursue graduate work in law, political science, economics and related areas) will probably want to choose the ethics and public policy concentration. Learning outcomes Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following: Demonstrate a good knowledge of and facility with the methods and concepts of modern, analytic philosophy Demonstrate a good knowledge of the current state of academic discussion of some of the central philosophical topics Demonstrate some knowledge of the history of philosophy, including both major themes and movements and some specific figures and systems Demonstrate the ability to think critically and systemically about philosophical problems, both abstract and practical, and to write clearly and cogently about them Demonstrate the ability to construct and analyze arguments clearly and cogently, independently of their subject matter.

ARTE 301. Art for Elementary Teachers. 3 Hours.

Continuous courses; 1 lecture, 1 seminar and 2 studio hours. 3-3 credits. Prerequisite: completion of ARTE 301 to enroll in ARTE 302. The nature of art and its function in the lives of individuals and society is considered in addition to materials and methods for guiding the visual expression of children.

ARTH 301. Art and Architecture of Ancient North America. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ARTH 103 and UNIV 200 or HONR 200, both with a minimum grade of C. A survey of the major artistic traditions of ancient America, north of Mexico, including Woodlands, Mississippian, Plains, Eskimo, Northwest Coast and the Southwest.