Sonya Clark
Professor and chair

arts.vcu.edu/craft

The Department of Craft and Material Studies explores the language of ceramics, glass, wood, fiber and metal. The department offers both a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Craft and Material Studies and a Master of Fine Arts in Fine Arts degree with concentrations in five disciplines: ceramics, fiber, furniture design, glassworking and jewelry/metalworking.

Students are encouraged to learn and explore through the traditional craft media. Together, faculty and students hone, improvise and redefine ancient technologies with new technologies; they bend and blend concepts and materials.

The Department of Craft and Material Studies is housed in a state-of-the-art facility that provides a safe and excellent physical environment in which to work. Students have access to well-equipped studios in each of the five media areas. The department shares the facilities with the departments of Sculpture, Painting and Printmaking, and Kinetic Imaging.

CRAF 211. Jewelry. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program. Investigation of basic jewelry making processes such as construction, chasing, surface embellishment and basic stone setting. Research in contemporary and historical jewelry forms.

CRAF 221. Woodworking Techniques. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program. Introduction to techniques of woodworking. Includes the use of hand tools; hand and machine joinery; shaping and carving; finishing; and techniques involving jigs and fixtures. Students participate in studio work.

CRAF 240. Introduction to Ceramics. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program. Introduction to beginning processes of wheel throwing and hand-built construction techniques, design, aesthetics and the creative development of clay objects examining cultural, historical and personal modes of expression. Demonstrations and slide presentations are given for assignments along with handouts to assist in illustrating techniques and processes. Students will be introduced to various ceramic aesthetics in contemporary, social and historical context.

CRAF 250. Introduction to Glass Fabrication. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program. An introduction and investigation into the physical and associative material properties of glass. Students will explore a variety of methodologies for hot, cold and casting glass fabrication. The history and modern application of each technique will be covered through lectures, demonstrations and studio work.

CRAF 260. Introduction to Textiles. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program. An introduction to basic textile techniques, tools and materials. This course introduces dyeing, weaving, felt-making, embroidery, sewing and related techniques. The history and modern application of each technique will be covered through lectures, demonstrations and studio work.

CRAF 282. Sophomore Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program. Introduction to the fields within the Department of Craft and Material Studies, critique practices, planning for arts career and writing within the field.

CRAF 301. Advanced Metal Fabrication: Forming. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF 211 with a minimum grade of C. This course introduces students to various metal forming techniques. While cultivating respect for craft, the underlying theme of the course explores form as a means of expression for both functional and nonfunctional work. It is designed to develop skill, craftsmanship and sensitivity to design in working with metal. The history and modern application of each technique will be covered through lectures, demonstrations and studio work.

CRAF 302. Advanced Metal Fabrication: Mechanisms. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF 211 with a minimum grade of C. This course introduces students to various fabrication techniques, findings and mechanisms related to the production of jewelry and small-scale objects. It is designed to develop skill, craftsmanship and sensitivity to design in working with metal. The history and modern application of each technique will be covered through lectures, demonstrations and studio work.

CRAF 303. Advanced Metal Fabrication: Surface Techniques. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF 211 with a minimum grade of C. This course introduces students to various surface treatments employed in the production of jewelry and metal objects. It is designed to develop skill, craftsmanship and sensitivity to design in working with metal. While cultivating respect for craft, the underlying theme of the course explores form as a means of expression for both functional and nonfunctional work. The history and modern application of each technique will be covered through lectures, demonstrations and studio work.

CRAF 304. Advanced Metal Fabrication: Casting and Stone Setting. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF 211 with a minimum grade of C. This course introduces students to casting and stone setting techniques employed in the production of jewelry and metal objects. It is designed to develop skill, craftsmanship and sensitivity to design in working with metal. While cultivating respect for craft, the underlying theme of the course explores form as a means of expression for both functional and nonfunctional work. The history and modern application of each technique will be covered through lectures, demonstrations and studio work.

CRAF 320. Furniture Design. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF 221 with a minimum grade of C. The course explores the development of ideas through drawings, mock-ups and the planning and execution of a small furniture object utilizing basic and specialized woodworking techniques.

CRAF 321. Advanced Woodworking and Furniture Design. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF 320 with a minimum grade of C. Advanced design and construction investigation of varied materials and machine processes.

CRAF 322. Advanced Woodworking and Furniture Design. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF 320 with a minimum grade of C. Advanced design and construction investigation of varied materials and machine processes.

CRAF 341. Advanced Ceramics. 4,6 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 or 12 studio hours. 4 or 6 credits. Each of the courses may be repeated for up to a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF 240 with a minimum grade of C. Advanced problems in the design and production of functional and nonfunctional ceramic products.

CRAF 342. Advanced Ceramics. 4,6 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 or 12 studio hours. 4 or 6 credits. Each of the courses may be repeated for up to a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF 240 with a minimum grade of C. Advanced problems in the design and production of functional and nonfunctional ceramic products.

CRAF 343. The Figure in Clay. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF 240 with a minimum grade of C. This course is a continuation of study in ceramics with a focus on the figure in clay. While cultivating respect for craft, the underlying theme of the course explores the figure in clay as a means of expression in an art-making medium. The history and modern application of each hand-building technique will be covered through lectures, demonstrations and studio work.

CRAF 344. Ceramics: Mold-Making. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF 240 with a minimum grade of C. This course is a continuation of study in ceramics with a focus on prototyping and mold-making techniques. While focused on generating original artwork, the course will cover prototype development and serialized production using a variety of mold-forming processes. The history and contemporary application of ceramic mold-making techniques will be covered through student research, demonstrations and studio work.

CRAF 351. Intermediate Glass Fabrication/Hot. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF 250 with a minimum grade of C. A deeper and broader delving into hot and cold glass fabrication techniques, with an introduction to the utilization and application of color processes will be explored.

CRAF 352. Intermediate Glass Fabrication/Kiln Forming. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF 250 with a minimum grade of C. A deeper exploration of warm glass (kiln forming) processes that will involve advanced mold-making techniques.

CRAF 353. Glassworking: Lampworking. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF 250 with a minimum grade of C. Provides an opportunity for further investigation, specialization and technical mastery in glass lampworking design.

CRAF 354. Intermediate Glass Fabrication. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF 250 with a minimum grade of C. A deeper and broader delving into hot and cold glass fabrication techniques, with an introduction to the utilization and application a multigenerational approach to image realization will be extensively investigated.

CRAF 361. Intermediate Textiles: Tapestry/Weaving. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF 260 with a minimum grade of C. An introduction to the floor loom with an emphasis on tapestry weaving. Concentrated studio work in contemporary and traditional loom techniques along with continuing individual investigation of other textile techniques.

CRAF 362. Intermediate Textiles: Pattern Weaving. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF 260 with a minimum grade of C. An introduction to the floor loom with an emphasis on pattern weaving. Concentrated studio work in contemporary and traditional loom techniques along with continuing individual investigation of other textile techniques.

CRAF 363. Fabric Design I. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF 260 with a minimum grade of C. Exploration of dye and pigment techniques for fabric along with pattern development and conceptual use of fabric.

CRAF 364. Fabric Design II. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF 260 with a minimum grade of C. Exploration of dye and pigment techniques for fabric along with pattern development and conceptual use of fabric.

CRAF 367. Tapestry. 4 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4, 4 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Origins of tapestry forms and execution of techniques.

CRAF 368. Tapestry. 4 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4, 4 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Origins of tapestry forms and execution of techniques.

CRAF 369. Ancient Peruvian Textile Techniques. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 or 12 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. An examination of textile techniques perfected in ancient Peru and their application to contemporary fiber work. Pre-Columbian cultures will be studied to understand textile development. Course includes student duplication of techniques to better understand "structure" and the production of a personal object(s) utilizing these techniques and information.

CRAF 382. Junior Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: CRAF 282 and UNIV 200 or HONR 200. Continued investigation of the craft field, critique practices, planning for careers through the lens of creativity and exploration, and a continuation of writing in the field.

CRAF 446. Glaze Technology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Development, formulation and application of ceramic glazes. The technology includes high, medium and low firing ranges as well as color and analysis of glaze materials.

CRAF 447. Ceramic Technology: Clay, Claybodies and Slips. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Study of clay from geological origins to practical application. Course includes development and application of clay bodies in different firing ranges, englobes and slips.

CRAF 455. Glass Through Time. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 1 studio hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. This class will be an in-depth examination of the application and utilization of the material glass throughout time. An inquiry into present and future artistic and architectural applications of the material will be explored.

CRAF 456. Survey of Glass. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 3 lecture hours. 3, 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. An examination of significant technological developments in glass from the past to present. First semester: ancient to 16th century. Second semester: 17th century to contemporary. Illustrated lectures.

CRAF 480. Senior Studio/Critique Course. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. Prerequisites: CRAF 382; and CRAF 301, 302, 303, 304, 320, 321, 322, 341, 342, 343, 344, 351, 352, 353, 354, 361, 362, 363, 364 or 369, both with a minimum grade of C. Corequisite: CRAF 301, 302, 303, 304, 320, 321, 322, 341, 342, 343, 344, 351, 352, 353, 354, 361, 362, 363, 364 or 369. Focuses on the development of independent interests aimed at creating a cohesive series/body of work.

CRAF 481. Senior Studio/Critique Course. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF 480 with a minimum grade of C. The course will focus on the continuation of creating a cohesive series/body of work begun during CRAF 480.

CRAF 482. Senior Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: senior standing in the major and CRAF 382. Capstone course focusing on the continued investigation of the craft field with emphasis on the student’s media area(s) of focus and professional practices.

CRAF 491. Topics in Craft/Material Studies. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A seminar or workshop on a selected issue or topic in the field of crafts. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

CRAF 492. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: senior standing in the major and permission of the instructor. The student will pursue advanced, individually directed study on a subject to be formulated in writing by the student and instructor.

CRAF 493. Fieldwork. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 135 clock hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: senior standing in the major and permission of department chair. Opportunity for practical work experiences. Senior students are placed with professionals who offer supervised work or research experience appropriate to their major interests. Participation requires the approval of both the department chair and field supervisor. Students must work 135 clock hours and maintain a daily log of their experiences. Field supervisor will plan student's work and evaluate performance.

CRAF 494. Fieldwork. 6 Hours.

Semester course; 270 clock hours. 6 credits. Prerequisites: senior standing in the major and permission of department chair. Opportunity for practical work experiences. Senior students are placed with professionals who offer supervised work or research experience appropriate to their major interests. Participation requires the approval of both the department chair and field supervisor. Students must work 270 clock hours and maintain a daily log of their experiences. Field supervisor will plan student's work and evaluate performance.