Details of the Extended Teacher Preparation program can be found in the Graduate Bulletin. Students interested in the program should speak with their adviser for more information.

Adult education

ADLT 402. How Adults Learn. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Overview of the adult as a learner. Topics include how and what adults learn, why adults participate in learning and major barriers to learning for adults. Implications for teachers/trainers of adults are explored.

Educational studies

EDUS 101. Teacher Cadet Program. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 hours. 3 credtis. Open only to students concurrently enrolled through a Teacher Cadet program at a participating Virginia high school. Designed to provide an introduction and foundation for the teaching profession, including awareness of personal attributes related to education, learning and cognitive styles, student growth and development, history and trends in public education, basic instructional approaches and the structure and governance of public education. The program includes an extended clinical component.

EDUS 200. Education in American Society. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An elective course for non-education majors, including those who may be exploring careers in education. An examination of the complex nature of our American educational system and various societal influences on that system. The course will include an exploration of some critical issues affecting the future of American education, on-site visits to educational institutions, and other field experiences in settings that will permit exploration of career options.

EDUS 202. Diversity, Democracy and Ethics. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 4 lecture hours. 4 credits. This course engages students in critical exploration of public education in the United States within sociocultural, historical and philosophical contexts. It examines the relationships between an increasingly diverse society and education in a democracy. Students will be taught the ethical obligations of educational professionals and how to become active agents for democratic, equity-oriented schools. In addition, the course will explore legal and policy aspects of education.

EDUS 300. School and Society. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours (delivered online, face-to-face or hybrid). 3 credits. The historical, sociological and philosophical backgrounds of educational theories and practices. The aim of the course is to help the student develop a basic understanding of education in the modern world.

EDUS 301. Human Development and Learning. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of human development through the life span with special emphasis on child and adolescent psychology, the nature of learning, and basic concepts of learning theories.

EDUS 304. Educational Psychology for Teacher Preparation. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours (delivered online, face-to-face or hybrid). 2 credits. The application of psychological principles to the teaching-learning process, with special emphasis on theories of learning and development. This course explores the application of psychological principles to the teaching-learning process, with special emphasis on learning and development. Intended specifically for pre- and in-service educators, the course will require students to apply theory and research in educational psychology to their prior, current and future teaching experiences.

EDUS 305. Educational Psychology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours (delivered online, face-to-face or hybrid). 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. The application of psychological principles to the teaching-learning process, with special emphasis on theories of learning and development. Crosslisted as: PSYC 305.

EDUS 400. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1-6 hours. 1-6 credits. Opportunities are provided for supervised research and independent study in selected areas. Designed for advanced students. All work offered on an individual basis with the approval of instructor and departmental chair.

EDUS 401. Assessment in Diverse Settings. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment is restricted to students admitted to a B.S. in Education program. This course explores all aspects of assessment that a teacher encounters in preK-12 educational settings. The course will cover current assessment theories, approaches and instruments used to measure the performance of the children and students representing the diverse learners in today’s classrooms -- including students with and without disabilities, English language learners and students representing a range of cultural backgrounds. Assessments at all stages of instruction (before, during and after), including formal and informal assessments and their applications in an inclusive educational setting, will be addressed. Particular attention is paid to the ways in which teachers can gather and use assessments to make data-informed decisions for effective instruction and intervention leading to optimal child development and student achievement. Specifically, the course will explore the relationships among content standards, instruction and assessment as well as ways to use a variety of assessments to monitor student progress. The course emphasizes making valid inferences from assessments in a variety of formats; understanding the legal and policy context of assessment; and the implications for appropriate grading practices and decision-making. Course content and assignments will promote critical-thinking and problem-solving skills. Crosslisted as: SEDP 401.

EDUS 476. Methods for Residence Hall Assistants. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: serve in VCU residence halls or permission of instructor. Course designed primarily to present resident assistants and others with student development concepts, peer assistance and helping skills, and group techniques. Residence halls will be used as primary learning laboratories.

EDUS 494. Topical Seminar in Education. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. A seminar intended for group study by personnel interested in examining topics, issues or problems related to the teaching, learning and development of students.

Reading and study skills

RDSS 100. Reading and College Study Skills. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of effective reading and study skills at the college-level. Emphasis is placed on vocabulary development as well as reading and study strategies.

RDSS 101. Advanced Reading, Study and Communication Skills. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture and laboratory hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: RDSS 100, adviser's recommendation, or instructor's permission. A study of advanced reading and study skills at the college-level. Students develop and apply critical reading-thinking skills, library research skills and advanced vocabulary.

Special education and disability policy

SEDP 200. Characteristics of Individuals With Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course focuses on characteristics and identification of individuals with learning disabilities, emotional and behavioral disorders, intellectual disabilities, developmental delay, the less severe autism spectrum disorders, traumatic brain injury, deaf-blindness, visual impairment and other health impairments, and knowledge of characteristics throughout the lifespan, as well as providing information on effects of educational, psychosocial and behavioral interventions that serve as adaptations to the general curriculum. The possibilities of co-morbid or multiple conditions, coupled with cross-categorical instructional settings, warrant a class that examines all eligibility categories of students served under the special education, general curriculum.

SEDP 201. Teaching Individuals With Mild and Moderate Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course provides an understanding and application of learning principles and methodologies for instructing, communicating and enhancing student learning that will reflect culturally responsive curriculum and pedagogy. An introduction to instructional strategies and organization of activities, including curriculum, media, materials and physical environment for children in grades K-12; studies of students with high-incidence disabilities in inclusive classroom environments are included. Candidates will develop skills to plan and deliver instruction in a variety of educational settings such as inclusive classrooms, resource rooms, self-contained classes and residential programs.

SEDP 203. Special Education Law. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course provides an overview of historical and current federal and state litigation and legislation, including those pertaining to special education and related services. Throughout this course, students will have various opportunities to learn federal and state statutes that address the educational rights of children/students with disabilities and their parents. Students will gain a deep understanding of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act. Specifically, students will become familiar with federal statutes and regulations concerning assessment and evaluation procedures, due process and mediation, discipline, individualized education program, free appropriate public education, and least restrictive environment. Additional federal laws that are discussed include the Rehabilitation Act of 1973: Section 504 and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Students are also expected to read and discuss selected issues in Virginia special education law and selected passages from the state statutes and the relevant administrative and case laws.

SEDP 204. Trends in Special Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course provides an understanding of the historical, philosophical and sociological foundations of public education in the United States, as well as standards for Virginia education and teaching professionals and ethical and accepted professional standards. The course will cover general knowledge of the foundations of educating students with disabilities, including a general overview of legislation and case law pertaining to special education; characteristics of individuals with and without exceptionalities, including growth and development from birth through adolescence; medical aspects of disabilities; family systems and culture; collaboration; integration/inclusion; transition; and classroom adaptations for educating students with disabilities in the least restrictive environments.

SEDP 216. Families and Professional Partnerships. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed to increase the knowledge, skills and dispositions that are important for collaborating and communicating effectively with families of young children with special needs. This course will also emphasize understanding the role and responsibilities of community agencies and providers, and how understanding the role of members of the collaborative team can impact families in the education and transition of their children with disabilities to include education, training, employment, self-determination and other skills. During this course, students will explore the dimensions of family-centered services and person-centered planning, as well as the familial, ecological and cultural factors affecting young children with disabilities and their caregivers. Students will learn about theory, general principles and procedures for fostering collaborative partnerships among families, professionals and other stakeholders that lead to outcomes of individual and mutual empowerment.

SEDP 250. Special Education Elementary Supervision. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 1 field experience hours. 3 credits. Enrollment is restricted to students with a minimum of 30 hours (sophomore, junior or senior standing). The purpose of this field experience is to provide teacher candidates with practical experiences within the classroom. The teacher candidate will be observed and evaluated based on demonstration of their knowledge and ability to meet performance standards measured by the Virginia Standards of Learning in any of the following areas: curriculum and instruction, assessment, classroom and behavior management, collaboration, professional and ethical behavior, characteristics, IEP development and implementation, instruction for reading, writing and mathematics, and transition.

SEDP 282. Multicultural Perspectives in Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed to enhance cultural competence in diverse classrooms and schools. Major considerations include race, ethnicity, socio-economic status, linguistic abilities, and gender and sexual orientation differences. Key concepts include structural, curricular and instructional facets of working successfully in diverse educational settings. Personal and theoretical constructs of race, ethnicity, culture, disability and other related concepts are explored. Through lectures, readings, group projects, class activities, videos and class discussions students will explore the impact of institutional "isms" on both Anglo students and students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

SEDP 311. Secondary Education and Transition Planning. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course explores the literature, research, issues and trends that are relevant to children and youth with high-incidence disabilities (learning disabilities, emotional disabilities and/or mild intellectual disabilities) as they prepare for their transition to life after high school. Focus is on providing candidates with the ability to prepare their students and work with their families to promote successful transitions throughout the educational experience, including post-secondary training, employment and independent living, which address an understanding of long-term planning, transition assessments, career development, life skills, community experiences and resources, self-advocacy and self-determination, guardianship, and legal considerations. The full range of functioning is addressed in the areas of education, employment, social/emotional functioning and development, and personal and daily living issues. The overriding goal of this course is to provide candidates with the wherewithal for critical reflection in their professional practice to help individuals with disabilities develop, implement and achieve self-determined transition goals for their post-school years.

SEDP 315. Classroom Management and Behavior Support for Students With Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course will provide an in-depth analysis of theoretical models, research and strategies for supporting positive behavior of students with disabilities. Emphasis is on developing, implementing and evaluating behavior management programs in special education, including applied behavior analysis, functional assessment, positive behavioral supports and related classroom strategies. This course will help develop a candidate’s ideas about examining the behaviors of students with special needs in school settings, including an understanding and application of school crisis management and safety plans, classroom and behavior management techniques, and individualized behavioral interventions. Techniques and approaches taught will promote skills that are consistent with norms, standards and rules of the educational environment and will be culturally diverse and responsive based upon developmental (e.g., students’ ages and classroom management), cognitive, behavioral, social and ecological theory and practice. Students will learn to evaluate students’ behavior and environments, as well as reflect on their own role in contributing to mitigating behavior problems. Candidates will also learn strategies to prevent and/or intervene in those factors to students’ problematic behavior and facilitate their positive behavior.

SEDP 320. Development and Implementation of Positive Behavior Support Plans. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed to provide pre-service teachers with the opportunity to acquire advanced skills for effective planning, implementing and evaluating behavior strategies and supports. It will also present strategies available for management, communication and discipline at the introductory level. Students will examine a cross section of theories, models and legal and ethical variables relevant to orchestrating learning across school settings where individuals with disabilities are receiving instructional, social, behavioral and transition life-skill services. The use of positive behavioral interventions and functional behavior analysis will be discussed and students will demonstrate appropriate skills using these strategies. Students will also learn the process used to develop and monitor behavior support plans.

SEDP 330. Survey of Special Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Presents an overview of the historical basis and regulatory requirements related to special education, including the individual education program as a legal document and the rights and responsibilities of parents, teachers and schools. The characteristics of learners with disabilities and their educational and medical implications are also examined, as well as the cultural, familial and ethical issues involved.

SEDP 350. Special Education Middle School Supervision. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 1 field experience hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SEDP 250. Enrollment is restricted to students with a minimum of 60 hours (junior or senior standing). The purpose of this field experience is to provide teacher candidates with practical experiences within the classroom. The teacher candidate will be observed and evaluated based on demonstration of their knowledge and ability to meet performance standards measured by the Virginia Standards of Learning in any of the following areas: curriculum and instruction, assessment, classroom and behavior management, collaboration, professional and ethical behavior, characteristics, IEP development and implementation, instruction for reading, writing and mathematics, and transition.

SEDP 378. Teaching Math to Students With Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed for prospective teachers in the special education program and addresses mathematics pedagogy for students with disabilities. The course will focus on selecting appropriate mathematics curricula and instructional methodologies; learning how to assess students and develop appropriate goals, including Virginia Standards of Learning across grades K-12; understanding of application of mathematics service delivery, curriculum and instruction of students with disabilities, including alternate ways to teach and adapt math content to students accessing the general curriculum across K-12 environments; and planning and integrating appropriate and evidence‐based math strategies into students’ programming based on assessment data.

SEDP 379. Assessment Practices in Autism and Developmental Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course creates a structure for understanding and designing effective social interactions and communication strategies, social-emotional development, and behavior interventions for children with autism spectrum disorder and other developmental disabilities. The course focuses on the application of empirically validated social interaction/communication and behavioral interventions that are consistent with principles of ABA in designing the interventions.

SEDP 380. Teaching Reading to Students With Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course provides empirically validated instructional procedures to address reading for students with disabilities. The focus will be on understanding state and national reading curriculum, pedagogy and assessments of students’ reading skills; planning and implementing appropriate instructional procedures; and monitoring students’ progress. Development of age-appropriate language acquisition, reading and writing is included. Curriculum development that includes scope and sequence, lesson plans, instructional methods based on access to the general curriculum and Virginia standards, including alternate ways to teach reading and writing content, is applied.

SEDP 389. IEP and Due Process in Special Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed to provide educational personnel with knowledge of the eligibility process and legal regulatory requirements for IEP development. Participants will apply knowledge of content standards, assessment and evaluations throughout the K-12 grades to construct IEPs; make decisions about student progress, instruction, program, accommodations, placement, teaching methods and transition; and complete hands-on IEP writing experiences that will address academic and functional needs of students with disabilities. Participants will engage in debate regarding due process and other regulatory requirements and measures, including the least restrictive setting for students with special needs, timelines and team member responsibilities.

SEDP 401. Assessment in Diverse Settings. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment is restricted to students admitted to a B.S. in Education program. This course explores all aspects of assessment that a teacher encounters in preK-12 educational settings. The course will cover current assessment theories, approaches and instruments used to measure the performance of the children and students representing the diverse learners in today’s classrooms -- including students with and without disabilities, English language learners and students representing a range of cultural backgrounds. Assessments at all stages of instruction (before, during and after), including formal and informal assessments and their applications in an inclusive educational setting, will be addressed. Particular attention is paid to the ways in which teachers can gather and use assessments to make data-informed decisions for effective instruction and intervention leading to optimal child development and student achievement. Specifically, the course will explore the relationships among content standards, instruction and assessment as well as ways to use a variety of assessments to monitor student progress. The course emphasizes making valid inferences from assessments in a variety of formats; understanding the legal and policy context of assessment; and the implications for appropriate grading practices and decision-making. Course content and assignments will promote critical-thinking and problem-solving skills. Crosslisted as: EDUS 401.

SEDP 402. Exceptionality and Technology: Augmentative and Alternative Communication and Assistive Technology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course will provide students with foundational ideas and concepts regarding the selection and use of assistive technology and augmentative and alternative communication for students with disabilities. Students will recognize and plan for the uses of technology that will aid the student in their education, work and independent living. This course emphasizes the selection and use of AT and AAC in general and special education settings (K-12) for students across the continuum of disability.

SEDP 404. Methods in Teaching Science and Social Studies for Students With Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment is restricted to juniors or seniors with a minimum of 60 credits. This course combines a process approach of science programs drawn from biological, earth and physical sciences with the study of social studies curriculum, materials and selected instructional strategies for teaching students with disabilities. An understanding of vocabulary development and comprehension skills in science and history will cultivate strategies for students to ask effective questions, summarize and retell both verbally and in writing strategies to impart an understanding of science and history standards of learning. The first half of this course will be dedicated to encouraging effective science instruction for diverse students, with the second half dedicated to encouraging effective social studies/science instruction.

SEDP 405. Collaborative Practices and Co-teaching in Inclusive Schools. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment is restricted to juniors or seniors with a minimum of 60 credits. This course is designed to help prospective general and special educators develop an understanding of collaborative and communication strategies, models and techniques to meet the educational needs of children with disabilities. Skills in consultation, case management and collaboration, including coordination of service delivery with related services providers, general educators, administrators, parents, students and other professions (e.g., paraprofessionals, community agencies) in collaborative work environments will be understood. Class activities, discussions and projects will concentrate on appropriately meeting the needs of children with disabilities within the context of the general education setting. Students will also study and practice a variety of instructional and organizational techniques for adapting the general classroom environments in order to address the needs of children with disabilities in the general education classroom.

SEDP 410. Building a Community of Learners: Classroom Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The course is designed to encompass pre-K through grade 12 classroom management theory and application, motivation theory and application, diversity, socio-emotional development, trauma-informed care, and restorative justice for regular education and special education students. Crosslisted as: TEDU 410.

SEDP 415. Action Research in Education and Special Education: Capstone Project. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment is restricted to seniors with a minimum of 90 credits. This course will prepare students to be reflective practitioners by connecting theory, research and practice through the exploration of action research. The course will consist of three components that promote students’ capacity for putting research into action related to their direct work with children and youth with disabilities and their families. Students will first be guided to investigate a research-based instruction/intervention strategy or approach to teaching children and youth with disabilities or developmental delays through a structured literature review. Students will then develop a research plan to be implemented during one of their externships based on the results of the literature review. Finally, students will present their literature review summary and research plan via an online and/or face-to-face poster presentation format. Ongoing, interactive reflections from students are essential components throughout the course.

SEDP 420. Special Education Leadership for Inclusive Schools. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment is restricted to students with a minimum of 90 credits (senior standing). This course will introduce participants to issues involved in leadership for creating inclusive environments in schools. These systems are aimed to fully include students with disabilities and ensure positive outcomes for students both academically and in functional skills needed for participation in the education environment, community, employment and for post-secondary success. Students will be challenged with assessing their own leadership styles, professional and ethical standards, personal integrity, and how beliefs and values shape actions. Students will also explore strategies to promote the importance of inclusive education as well examine Virginia standards and CEC standards for inclusive schools. Students will have a chance to see the impact of teacher leadership on special education and understand how to promote self-advocacy in students.

SEDP 450. Special Education High School Supervision. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 1 field experience hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SEDP 350. Enrollment is restricted to students with a minimum of 60 hours (junior or senior standing). The purpose of this field experience is to provide teacher candidates with practical experiences within the classroom. The teacher candidate will be observed and evaluated based on demonstration of their knowledge and ability to meet performance standards measured by the Virginia Standards of Learning in any of the following areas: curriculum and instruction, assessment, classroom and behavior management, collaboration, professional and ethical behavior, characteristics, IEP development and implementation, instruction for reading, writing and mathematics, and transition.

SEDP 460. Specialized Reading and Writing Interventions for Students With Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SEDP 380. This course will cover the complex nature of language and literacy to include assessment strategies and instructional procedures, curriculum and instruction alternatives, and program planning for the literacy development of students with reading and/or writing disabilities. Skills in the area of phonemic awareness, sound and symbol relationships, explicit phonics instruction, syllables, phonemes, morphemes, decoding skills, word attack skills, syntax and semantics will be developed. Students will learn teaching skills, remediating deficits, utilizing research/evidence-based interventions, providing explicit reading and writing instruction, implementing and evaluating individual and group management techniques and individual interventions that teach and maintain emotional, behavioral and social skills across ages and developmental levels. The course will focus on how, as a teacher, one participates in tiered support systems and facilitates/provides appropriately focused and intensive literacy instruction.

SEDP 461. Specialized Math Interventions for Students With High Incidence Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SEDP 378. This course focuses on interventions for students with high incidence disabilities who may need additional instruction beyond their core mathematics class. The course is designed to increase student understanding and achievement by increasing time and intensity on grade-level standards. Strategies used in the intervention course should be different than strategies used in the core math course and are inclusive of all student populations, including general education, special education or English language learners. When done appropriately, this course will both build student confidence and reduce the likelihood of them repeating their core mathematics course. In addition, students will explore research and evidence-based interventions. The class will be designed around the seven principles of effective intervention for students with mathematics disabilities.

SEDP 492. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Opportunities are provided for supervised independent study in selected areas. All work offered on an individual basis with the approval of instructor and department chair.

SEDP 495. Universal Design for Learning and Transition. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The purpose of this course is to provide students with evidence of each of the components of universal design for learning within access to the general academic curriculum -- multiple means of representation, expression and engagement. Students will engage in an understanding of theories of learning and development, including cognitive and learning processes, social-emotional development, practices for culturally and linguistically diverse learnings, such as English learners, gifted and talented students and students with disabilities, in individual and universal contexts. Additional focus is placed on UDL components linked to effective transition planning embedded within academic instruction targeting successful transitions to postsecondary educational settings. Emphasis is placed on beginning research on the use of this approach and its promising practice for addressing academic and transition goals as well as increasing student motivation and self-determination.

SEDP 499. Student Teaching. 6 Hours.

Semester course; 6 field experience hours. 6 credits. The major goal of this course is to provide student teachers a challenging, relevant and rewarding experience, which will allow them to acquire professional competence. Student teachers will learn to respect and work effectively with students of varying backgrounds and disabilities; assume the various responsibilities of the classroom teacher; plan instruction and learning experiences that recognize the individual needs and differences of students; organize and manage the classroom environment to maximize learning; and practice being a reflective teacher.

Teacher education

TEDU 101. Introduction to Teaching. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides undergraduate students with an introduction to teaching and learning in elementary settings. Students will explore current educational reforms and their influences on elementary schools and students. Service-learning activities will enable students to gain firsthand experiences in urban elementary classrooms.

TEDU 102. Health Education as a Discipline. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of health behavior theories, valid sources of information and tools for assessing school health needs. Community health issues and health advocacy are also examined.

TEDU 103. Lifetime Fitness, Wellness and Nutrition for the Health and Physical Educator. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed to provide health and physical educators the foundational knowledge specific to concepts related to the health- and skills-related components of fitness, functional fitness, energy balance and overall well-being. The course will provide an overview of the necessary skills needed to develop smart goals for personal fitness, nutrition and wellness.

TEDU 200. Motor Learning and Performance. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Students will be introduced to the major concepts of motor control and motor learning and influencing conditions. The course will provide a framework for understanding the structure and function of the nervous system in relation to perception and motor control. Other topics include the general nature of skill acquisition and how learners interact with the environment while performing motor tasks. The theoretical framework underlying learning and memory are related to the acquisition of motor skills.

TEDU 201. Assessment and Technology in Health and Physical Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course provides students with the theoretical foundation for assessment in health and physical education. Students will utilize multiple data sources, develop rubrics and analyze available technologies for assessment within each of the domains of K-12 health and physical education. Students will design lessons utilizing technology with the purpose of enhancing the curriculum.

TEDU 202. Health Education Content. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course focuses on health promotion and the prevention of injury and disease. Students will also examine healthy relationships as well as mental and emotional health.

TEDU 203. Focus on Choice. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 3 credits. A career planning experience for adults focusing on discontinuity in life patterns and a review of current educational and occupational opportunities. Consideration of the world of work, fields of education and volunteer service, and the development of one’s own potential will be featured.

TEDU 204. Outdoor Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed to examine the principal philosophical foundations of adventure theory and outdoor educational leadership. Concepts of judgment, decision-making, leadership and environmentally correct practices are introduced. Cooperative and team-building practices will be emphasized as a way to promote increased collaboration, communication, critical-thinking and creativity while in the health and physical education environment. Students will learn pedagogical skills needed to teach a number of outdoor education activities, including a variety of teaching styles, the development of lesson plans, assessment in the four domains of physical education and the use of basic class management skills.

TEDU 205. History and Philosophy of Health and Physical Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course has been designed to provide an overview of the professional aspects of health and physical education. Specifically, the course provides students with knowledge of the historical role of health and physical education; acquaints them with the different domains that fit under the “physical education” umbrella and within the health professions; informs them of opportunities present at VCU and in the greater community in the health and physical education fields; and provides information about the full spectrum of career choices in physical education and health. Students will also spend one hour a week in a public school setting.

TEDU 300. Adapted Physical Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed to prepare future teachers and professionals to meet the needs of persons with disabilities in organized health, physical education and activity programs in the school and/or recreational and sport setting. It provides an overview of those disabilities found most frequently in public schools. The course will also help students become critically reflective learners.

TEDU 301. Biomechanics of Teaching Movement Skills. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Students will participate in learning experiences that will lead to the development of fundamental movement skills, i.e., manipulative, locomotor and nonlocomotor. Utilization of basic biomechanical principles will be infused in all topics.

TEDU 302. Elementary Methods of Physical Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed to enhance student knowledge of and preparation for the teaching of elementary physical education through lecture, practical experience, small-group work and projects. Students will learn how to plan and conduct an elementary program, control the learning environment, effectively discipline children and analyze children's behavior. Students will also learn the characteristics of a good teacher as well as methods to change personal teaching behaviors to increase classroom effectiveness. Students will design and conduct activities which integrate literacy with physical education. To become a more reflective teacher, students will write self-evaluations throughout the semester.

TEDU 303. Teaching Team and Individual Sports for Lifetime Fitness. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Students will develop educational skills and methodology for instruction of team and individual lifetime sports and activities in the gymnasium and outdoor settings. They will learn the pedagogical skills needed to teach these activities, including the use of a variety of teaching styles, the development of lesson plans, the assessment of student knowledge and skill acquisition, and the use of basic class management skills. These pedagogical skills will be applied within the realm of specific sports such as flag football, soccer, tchoukball, team handball, badminton, pickleball and golf.

TEDU 304. Secondary Methods of Physical Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed to prepare students for student teaching. Students will learn pedagogical skills including the use of a variety of teaching styles, the development of lesson plans and unit plans, the assessment of student knowledge and skill acquisition, and the use of classroom management skills. In addition, students will gain insight into the development of a physical education curriculum as influenced by philosophies, models, issues and trends. Elementary, middle and high school levels are included in discussions. Students will also learn how to integrate literacy into the physical education curriculum. A major emphasis will be to prepare students as critical reflective practitioners by learning how to evaluate the teaching/learning situation and make appropriate changes. In that regard, students will learn how to design and analyze instruments that help them in this evaluation.

TEDU 310. Elementary School Practicum A. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Corequisites: TEDU 410, TEDU 414 and TEDU 426. Restricted to students admitted to the Extended Teacher Preparation Program. A field placement that precedes student teaching/internship. Includes planned observations, tutorials and small-group involvement. Graded pass/fail.

TEDU 311. Middle School Practicum. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Corequisite: TEDU 537. Restricted to students admitted to the Extended Teacher Preparation Program. A field placement that precedes student teaching/internship. Includes planned observations, tutorials and small-group involvement. Graded pass/fail.

TEDU 312. High School Practicum. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Pre- or corequisite: TEDU 311; corequisite: TEDU 540, 545, 547 or 548. Restricted to students admitted to the M.T. program with concentrations in secondary education. A field placement that precedes student teaching/internship. Includes planned observations, tutorials and small-group involvement. Course graded as pass/fail.

TEDU 313. Elementary School Practicum B. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 practicum hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: TEDU 310. Corequisites: TEDU 517, TEDU 522 and TEDU 591. Enrollment is restricted to students admitted to the M.T. program with a concentration in early and elementary education. A field placement that precedes student teaching/internship. Includes planned observations, tutorials and small-group and whole class involvement. Graded as pass/fail.

TEDU 385. Teaching Writing Through Children’s Literature. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course will focus on the art of teaching writing through the use of quality children’s literature. The course is designed to give students an appreciation of the value of children’s literature, examine current trends and explore the use of literature across the genres as tools for developing readers and writers. In addition, students will learn to construct a successful community of writers in PK and elementary classrooms. Students will critically examine theory, techniques and strategies in the context of how children learn to think and write. A focus on pedagogical and rhetorical theory will include an examination of personal writing processes.

TEDU 386. Children's Literature I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 211, 215, 236, 291 or 295. Designed to give students an appreciation of children's literature; includes biography, fable, myth, traditional and modern fanciful tales and poetry, as well as a survey of the history of children's literature. Crosslisted as: ENGL 386.

TEDU 387. Literature for Adolescents. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 211, 215, 236, 291 or 295. Designed to acquaint the prospective middle and secondary school English teacher with the nature, scope and uses of adolescent literature. The student is acquainted with reading materials for meeting the varied needs and interests of adolescents.

TEDU 389. The Teaching of Writing Skills. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Studies the theory and methods for teaching writing to students in middle and secondary schools. Teaches strategies for prewriting, composing, peer revision, evaluation and topic construction. Includes extensive journal and essay writing. Crosslisted as: ENGL 389.

TEDU 390. Movement Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. This service-learning course will examine the physiological changes that occur in the brain as a result of moderate physical activity and the relationship to increased cognition. Students will also examine how to develop movement-based lessons to complement existing curricula across all content areas. Students enrolled in this course will receive a movement education certification upon completion of the course requirements.

TEDU 400. Independent Study. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1-6 hours. 1-6 credits. Opportunities are provided for supervised research and independent study in selected areas. Designed for advanced students. All work offered on an individual basis with the approval of instructor and departmental chair.

TEDU 402. Becoming a Health and Physical Education Professional. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. This course is designed to prepare the teacher candidate to bridge from student to student teacher. Activities focus on professional experiences and behaviors.

TEDU 403. Teaching Health Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course has been designed to prepare students to think critically and become independent problem-solvers and decision-makers by applying previously acquired professional knowledge to curriculum design and instruction in multiple settings. Students will learn pedagogical skills including the use of a variety of teaching styles, the development of lesson plans and unit plans, the assessment of student knowledge and skill acquisition, and the use of classroom management skills. Students will also gain insight into the development of a health education curriculum as influenced by philosophies, models, issues and trends. Elementary, middle and high school levels are included in discussion.

TEDU 405. Seminar for Student Teaching. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Corequisites: TEDU 493 and TEDU 495. This seminar is “attached” to the student teaching internship in the schools and is intended as a companion piece to that semester experience. Issues, including those which have been identified by members of the seminar, as well as issues that arise in the classroom and those that are of perennial concern to teachers of health and physical education are the basis for this class. The teacher as the critically reflective educator is the focus of this seminar: what choices the teacher has in the classroom and what effect those choices have upon student learning.

TEDU 410. Building a Community of Learners: Classroom Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The course is designed to encompass pre-K through grade 12 classroom management theory and application, motivation theory and application, diversity, socio-emotional development, trauma-informed care, and restorative justice for regular education and special education students. Crosslisted as: SEDP 410.

TEDU 411. Integrating the Arts in Curriculum for Young Children. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides pre-service teachers with an understanding of how experiences in visual art, music, drama and movement can be used to support the growth and development of children ages 3 to 8. Students will learn of the importance of all of the arts for children's cognitive, socio-emotional and psychomotor development. Emphasis will be given to integrating developmentally appropriate experiences in the arts into early childhood curriculum.

TEDU 413. Curriculum Methods and Instructional Models. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of developmentally appropriate curriculum and instructional models for Pk-12 children. The course includes the study of curriculum, a variety of instructional models, Virginia Standards of Learning, Virginia’s Foundation Blocks for Early Learning, diversity, assessment, planning and creating positive learning environments.

TEDU 414. Curriculum and Methods for Early/Elementary Children. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 4 lecture hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: admission to teacher preparation program. Corequisites: TEDU 310 (Practicum A) and 426. A study of developmentally appropriate curriculum and methods for early/elementary children, including diversity, assessment, behavior guidance and management, planning instruction and creating positive learning environments. Includes an overview of the history of early/elementary education and issues currently facing the profession.

TEDU 416. Math/Science Methods for Early Childhood Education. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3.5 hour lecture and .5 hours field experience hours. 4 credits. A combined math and science early and elementary methods course that focuses on the teaching of mathematics and science in a PK through 3rd grade class. The course is a lecture/ hands-on course connected with a practicum experience in a local PK-3rd grade classroom. This course is designed to teach pre-service teachers how to plan, implement and assess strong student-centered mathematics and science lessons in today’s diverse classrooms. Activities and assignments will focus on research-based practices, effectively using a variety of instructional strategies and hands-on experiences to help students develop their understanding of abstract math and science concepts. The class will help to position the pre-service teacher as a reflective decision-maker.

TEDU 417. Early/Elementary Science Methods. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2.5 lecture and .5 field experience hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: TEDU 413. Corequisites: TEDU 422 and TEDU 496. An undergraduate course designed to renew and/or expand teachers' knowledge and skills in the teaching of science in the elementary classroom and the community. New materials will be examined in the light of current trends, research findings and professional recommendations.

TEDU 420. Teaching Middle and High School Engineering. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: EDUS 301. Enrollment is restricted to students admitted to teacher preparation or by permission of instructor. Examines the teaching strategies, materials and objectives of engineering education in middle and high schools. Emphasizes the engineering processes, engineering design cycle, integration of science and mathematics into engineering and use of design challenges to engage students in real-world applications of engineering.

TEDU 422. Early/Elementary Math Methods. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2.5 lecture and .5 field experience hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: MATH 303, MATH 361, MATH 362 and TEDU 203. Corequisites: TEDU 417 and TEDU 496. An early and elementary mathematics methods course that focuses on the teaching of mathematics in the PK through 6th grade classroom. The course is a lecture/ hands on course with 40 hours of in class contact time and a 20 contact hour practicum experience in a local K-5 classroom. This course is designed to teach preservice teachers how to plan, implement and assess strong student-based mathematics lessons in today’s diverse classrooms. Activities and assignments will focus on research-based practices, effectively using a variety of instructional strategies and using math manipulatives to help students discuss their thinking. The class will help to position the preservice teacher as a reflective decision-maker.

TEDU 425. Emergent and Early Literacy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course provides an introduction to the theories, concepts, pedagogical approaches, methods and materials used to promote early literacy acquisition and development. Within the framework of the stages of literacy development, students will develop competency in the components of emergent literacy, including language development, phonological and phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, comprehension, vocabulary and writing. Application of course content in preschool and early elementary classrooms will encourage critical reflection on pedagogical approaches as students meet the diverse language and learning needs of young children ages birth to 8.

TEDU 426. Teaching Reading and Other Language Arts. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Presents teaching strategies and materials in reading and the other language arts based on current theory and research. Emphasizes the interrelatedness of listening, speaking, reading and writing and the importance of naturalistic language experiences.

TEDU 452. Teaching English Language Learners. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: TEDU 413. This course is designed to help teachers who plan to teach English and other content areas to PK-12 students who are speakers of other languages. The course includes attention to social and cultural contexts, the diversity of emergent bilingual students in the United States, legal and policy contexts, models of ESL programs and advocacy for students. Students will also also develop skills in lesson preparation and delivery for emergent bilingual students within ESL classrooms as well as in other content area classrooms.

TEDU 462. Internship I. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 4 lecture hours. 4 credits. Prerequisites: TEDU 312, TEDU 410, TEDU 414 and TEDU 420. Corequisites: TEDU 464 and TEDU 481. This internship serves as the teacher candidate’s culminating clinical experience. It provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned during their professional academic preparation. It also serves as an opportunity for public school and VCU personnel to evaluate and strengthen teacher candidates’ application of theory to practice in a secondary classroom.

TEDU 464. Internship II. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 4 lecture hours. 4 credits. Prerequisites: TEDU 312, TEDU 410, TEDU 413 and TEDU 420. Corequisites: TEDU 462 and TEDU 480. Enrollment is restricted to students who have received passing scores on VCLA and Praxis II. This internship serves as the teacher candidate’s culminating clinical experience. Teacher candidates complete a full-time placement that provides them with an opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned during their professional academic preparation. It also serves as an opportunity for public school and VCU personnel to evaluate and strengthen teacher candidates’ application of theory to practice in a secondary classroom.

TEDU 466. Literacy Assessment and Intervention in the Early/Elementary Classroom. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 3.5 lecture and .5 field experience hours. 4 credits. Prerequisites: TEDU 425 and TEDU 426. Students will examine reading problems by focusing on reading diagnosis and intervention related to classroom settings. This course involves evaluating and tutoring individual students with reading difficulties. Emphasis is placed on making decisions based upon students’ individual needs and critical reflection to improve instruction. Throughout the semester, students will develop skills as an educator who is a critically reflective practitioner using the VCU School of Education conceptual framework as a guide. Completion of a supervised practicum is a requirement of the course.

TEDU 471. Internship I (PK-K). 4 Hours.

Semester course; 4 field experience hours. 4 credits. Prerequisites: TEDU 416, TEDU 466 and TEDU 490. Corequisites: TEDU 475 and TEDU 481. Enrollment is restricted to students who have completed the student teaching approval process (including passing scores on VCLA and Praxis II). This internship serves as the teacher candidate’s culminating clinical experience. It provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned during their professional academic preparation. It also serves as an opportunity for public school and VCU personnel to evaluate and strengthen teacher candidates’ application of theory to practice in an early childhood classroom setting. Teacher candidates complete a full-time seven-to-eight-week placement in a PK/K classroom and assume full responsibility for planning and implementing instruction under the tutelage of a cooperating teacher for a minimum of two weeks.

TEDU 472. Elementary Internship I (PK-2). 4 Hours.

Semester course; 4 field experience hours. 4 credits. Prerequisites: TEDU 417, TEDU 422, TEDU 466 and TEDU 496. Corequisites: TEDU 474 and TEDU 481. Enrollment is restricted to students with passing scores on VCLA and Praxis II. This internship serves as the teacher candidate’s culminating clinical experience. It provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned during their professional academic preparation. It also serves as an opportunity for public school and VCU personnel to evaluate and strengthen teacher candidates’ application of theory to practice in an elementary classroom. Teacher candidates complete a full-time seven-to-eight-week placement in a pre-K/kindergarten to 2nd grade classroom.

TEDU 474. Elementary Internship II (Grades 3-5). 4 Hours.

Semester course; 4 field experience hours. 4 credits. Prerequisites: TEDU 417, TEDU 422, TEDU 466 and TEDU 496. Corequisites: TEDU 472 and TEDU 481. This internship serves as the teacher candidate’s culminating clinical experience. It provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned during their professional academic preparation. In addition it serves as an opportunity for public school and VCU personnel to evaluate and strengthen teacher candidates’ application of theory to practice in an elementary classroom. Teacher candidates complete a full-time seven-to-eight-week placement in a 3rd through 5th grade classroom. For this internship there is sometimes an option to be placed in a sixth grade classroom as well.

TEDU 475. Internship II (Grades 1-3). 4 Hours.

Semester course; 4 field experience hours. 4 credits. Prerequisites: TEDU 416, TEDU 466 and TEDU 490. Corequisites: TEDU 471 and TEDU 481. Enrollment is restricted to students who have completed the student teaching approval process (including passing scores on VCLA and Praxis II). This internship serves as the teacher candidate’s culminating clinical experience. It provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned during their professional academic preparation. It also serves as an opportunity for public school and VCU personnel to evaluate and strengthen teacher candidates’ application of theory to practice in an early childhood classroom setting. Teacher candidates complete a full-time seven-to-eight-week placement in a grade 1-3 classroom and assume full responsibility for planning and implementing instruction under the tutelage of a cooperating teacher for a minimum of two weeks.

TEDU 480. Investigations and Trends in Teaching: Engineering. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Corequisites: TEDU 462 and TEDU 464. This course is a companion to the student internship in secondary education. Its major purposes are to cultivate the knowledge, dispositions and skills of a critically reflective practitioner into actual teaching practice. To do so, this class provides opportunities for interns to describe, analyze and evaluate the curricular, instructional and management decisions they make during their internship. The course also focuses on professionalism and ethical standards, as well as personal integrity in the teaching profession.

TEDU 481. Teaching as a Profession. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Corequisites: TEDU 472 and TEDU 474; or TEDU 471 and TEDU 475. This course is a companion piece to the student internship in elementary education. Its major purposes are to cultivate the knowledge, dispositions and skills of a critically reflective practitioner into actual teaching practice. To do so, this class provides opportunities for interns to describe, analyze and evaluate the curricular, instructional and management decisions they make during their internship. The course also focuses on professionalism and ethical standards, as well as personal integrity in the teaching profession.

TEDU 485. Directed Student Teaching I. 6 Hours.

6 credits. Prerequisites: admission to TEDU 310 or equivalent with a minimum grade of C, recommendation of practicum supervisor and passing score on the VCLA test. A classroom teaching experience in a public school or other approved setting, which includes opportunities for increasing involvement with children. Culminates in full responsibility for planning, implementing and evaluating classroom activities.

TEDU 486. Directed Student Teaching II. 6 Hours.

6 credits. Prerequisites: admission to TEDU 310 or equivalent with a grade of C or better and recommendation of practicum supervisor. A classroom teaching experience in a public school or other approved setting, which includes opportunities for increasing involvement with children. Culminates in full responsibility for planning, implementing and evaluating classroom activities.

TEDU 490. Social Studies Methods for Early Learners. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 1.75 lecture and .25 field experience hours. 2 credits. This course’s design is centered on helping the pre-service PK-3 early childhood/elementary teacher examine the purpose of social studies education, the connections between social studies and other curricular areas, and the persisting issues in social studies education, and to do it in an equitable way for all learners. The course will introduce students to an integrative reflective planning process and a variety of instructional strategies and materials. Its ultimate goal is to prepare students to understand the role of the teacher as a reflective decision-maker.

TEDU 493. Field Experience I. 6 Hours.

Semester course; 6 field experience hours. 6 credits. Enrollment is restricted to students who have been admitted to teacher education and have passing scores on VCLA, Praxis I and Praxis II. An in-depth field experience in a public school, health education/health promotion agency or other approved setting. Students gain practical experience in teaching in the PK-5 health and physical education setting with greater practical application of skills culminating in full responsibility for planning, implementing and evaluating the classroom. A minimum of 50 contact hours per credit hour is required; consult with adviser to obtain a course syllabus regarding prerequisites and specific course requirements. Fulfills capstone requirement.

TEDU 494. Topical Seminar in Education. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. A seminar intended for group study by personnel interested in examining topics, issues or problems related to the teaching, learning and development of students.

TEDU 495. Field Experience II. 6 Hours.

Semester course; 6 field experience hours. 6 credits. Enrollment is restricted to students who have been admitted to teacher education and have passing scores on VCLA, Praxis I and Praxis II. Addresses competencies in health and physical education. Provides experiences at an approved affiliate site under the supervision of faculty and approved site supervisors. Students gain practical experience in teaching in the grades 6-12 health and physical education setting. A minimum of 50 contact hours per credit hour is required.

TEDU 496. Early/Elementary Social Studies Methods. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2.5 lecture and .5 field experience hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: TEDU 413. Corequisites: TEDU 417 and TEDU 422. This course’s design is centered on helping the Pk-6 teacher examine the purpose of social studies education, the connections between the discipline of social studies and other curricular areas, and the persisting issues in social studies education in an equitable way for all learners. The course will introduce students to an integrative reflective planning process and a variety of instructional strategies and materials. Its ultimate goal is to prepare students to understand the role of the teacher as a reflective decision-maker.