Colleen Thoma, Ph.D.
Professor and chair

soe.vcu.edu/departmentpages/counseling-and-special-education

The Department of Counseling and Special Education blends top-tier, accredited programs in counselor education and special education and disability policy to create a unique, interdisciplinary academic environment for students and faculty. The department’s primary mission is to prepare graduates to be leaders, ready to make a difference in people’s lives. Courses emphasize applicable learning, incorporating the practical tasks and situations students will be faced with on the job.

The nationally recognized faculty members provide guidance and support, allowing students to fully explore their areas of interest. The department provides the tools that help students examine, refine and challenge current methods and scholarship and to use evidence-based research. Learn more by visiting the Department of Counseling and Special Education webpage.

Counselor education

CLED 501. A Survey of the Counseling Profession. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Course restriction: Students must have, at minimum, senior class status before taking this course. An introductory course for any student interested in pursuing a career as a counselor. An overview of the counseling profession and counselor professional identity.

CLED 520. Gender Issues in Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Overview of gender issues and their relationship to the counseling process. Class focuses on understanding the unique issues men and women bring to counseling and providing appropriate counseling interventions. Focus is on appropriate gender developmental tasks and how diversity in age, religion, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status and sexual orientation relates to relationships and to counseling men and women.

CLED 600. Professional Orientation and Ethical Practice in Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: admission to counselor education program or permission of instructor. An introductory course for all students in counselor education that provides an overview of the counseling profession and explores ethical and legal standards in the counseling field. The course focuses on ethical standards of professional organizations, federal and state legal mandates and the application of ethical and legal considerations in counseling practice.

CLED 601. Theories of Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: admission to counselor education program or permission of instructor. Selected theories upon which counseling is based, with particular attention placed on the research underlying the theories. Primary focus on providing students with a theoretical foundation upon which to base their personal counseling approaches.

CLED 602. Techniques of Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment requires admission to counselor education program or permission of instructor. Theory and practice of counseling with emphasis on skill development.

CLED 603. Group Procedures in Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Pre- or corequisites: CLED 600, CLED 601 and CLED 602. Analyzes the theories and practice of group work, the relationship of group activities to counseling, and specific skills in group techniques.

CLED 604. Practicum: School Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: CLED 603; and CLED 613 or CLED 622. Seminar and supervised field experience in individual and group counseling and classroom group guidance.

CLED 605. Career Information and Exploration. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: CLED 600 and 601. Designed to provide the potential counselor with an understanding of theoretical approaches to career development in grades K-adult. Emphasis will be given to the relationship between counselor and student(s) in the career development process. A review of occupational, educational and personal/social information resources will be made.

CLED 606. Assessment Techniques for Counselors. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: CLED 600 and 601. Principles and techniques involved in selecting, scoring and interpreting standardized and nonstandardized assessment instruments used by counselors.

CLED 607. Multicultural Counseling in Educational Settings. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: instructor approval. A study of personal, social, political, affective and behavioral considerations of diversity. Multicultural competencies including awareness, knowledge and skills in counseling are emphasized. Efforts will be made to provide school counselors and postsecondary student affairs professionals with practical skills, strategies and techniques for use when working with students and families from a variety of cultural backgrounds.

CLED 608. Practicum: College Student Development and Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: CLED 603, CLED 605 and CLED 660; and CLED 620 or CLED 631. Seminar and supervised field experience in student services in postsecondary educational settings.

CLED 610. Counseling in Elementary and Middle Schools. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: CLED 600 and 601. An intensive study of school counseling programs for children and young adolescents. Emphasizes the role of elementary and middle school counselors in developmental guidance. Methods for classroom guidance will be discussed.

CLED 612. Seminar in Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: admission to counselor education program or permission of instructor. A survey course that introduces various theories and strategies that support wellness and development. Topics include counselor and client wellness, supervision, psychopathology, crisis intervention, suicide prevention and theories on addictions.

CLED 613. Data-driven Comprehensive School Counseling Programs. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment restricted to students admitted to counselor education program or with permission of instructor. Considers the history of the pro¬fession, current issues and future trends. Addresses professional organizations and ethical guidelines and will focus on the role of school counselors in becoming advocates for students and leaders in the school environment.

CLED 615. Lifespan Development: A Gender Perspective. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Overview of human development theories and the impact of cultural gender messages on the developmental process. Crosslisted as: EDUS 615.

CLED 620. Student Development Services in Higher Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Pre- or corequisites: CLED 600 and CLED 601 or by permission of instructor. An overview of the organization and management of student services in postsecondary institutions. Areas such as admissions, career services, academic advising, residential life, financial aid, student development services, student union programming and management, and student activities are reviewed.

CLED 621. Secondary School Counseling Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: CLED 600 and 601. An advanced course designed to provide a means for intensive study of secondary school counseling. The approach will be to integrate professional knowledge and skills from various disciplines as they relate to the work of the secondary school counselor.

CLED 622. School Counseling Services. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment restricted to students admitted to counselor education program or with permission of instructor. Focuses on the organization, administration and delivery of school counseling services in pre-K-12 schools.

CLED 630. Clinical Supervision in the Counseling Profession. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Selected theories upon which clinical supervision in the counseling field is based, with particular attention placed on the research underlying the theories. Primary focus on providing students with a theoretical foundation upon which to base their supervision practice.

CLED 631. American College and University. 3 Hours.

3 credits. Examines historical and contemporary foundations of American higher education through the study of leading developments and of contemporary issues relating to the curriculum, aims and objectives and current directions of American colleges, universities and other institutional settings of higher education. Crosslisted as: EDUS 631.

CLED 633. Academic Leadership in Higher Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Analyzes how leadership in higher education is similar to and different from leadership in other organizational settings; explores challenges for leadership (such as access, cost and social responsiveness) and examines emerging leadership roles at various levels of the academic organization. Crosslisted as: EDUS 633.

CLED 640. Marriage, Couples and Family Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: CLED 600 and CLED 601. This course provides students with an overview of the processes and theories involved with counseling couples and families. The focus is on preparing students to think systemically and to learn about family concepts, development, dynamics, theories, assessments and techniques. Counseling experience and feedback from the instructor and classmates will be provided. Students will use critical reflection throughout the semester while meeting the requirements of this course.

CLED 642. Organization and Administration of Guidance Services. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of organizational principles and procedures necessary for the effective administration of guidance services. Consideration is given to procedures used in establishing guidance programs or modifying existing ones (or both), including the study of various community resources that can contribute to more efficient guidance services.

CLED 650. Addiction Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is an entry-level graduate course that provides counselors and other human service workers with an overview of the addictive process. Theories of addiction counseling and application of these theories will comprise a significant part of this course, particularly with how they apply to work with individuals, couples, families and groups. Co-occurring disorders, such as process addictions and mental illnesses will also be addressed. Students will develop conceptual knowledge, practical skills and self-awareness concerning the etiology of addiction, assessment strategies (including the use of wraparound assessment and intervention services), wellness strategies for facilitating optimal development and preventing clinician burn-out, and diagnosis and treatment planning. This will be accomplished through assigned readings, seminar discussions, videotapes, lectures, case presentations, guest speakers and student assignments.

CLED 660. Mental Disorders, Diagnosis and Treatment Planning. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Pre- or corequisite: CLED 603. The course examines the history, paradigms, theory and practice of mental health diagnosis, with primary emphasis on the identification of issues related to thinking (cognition), feeling (affect) and acting (behavior) upon which diagnoses are based. The purpose of this course is for students to become familiar with the study of mental disorders and learn the system of classification of mental disorders, the DSM-5.

CLED 672. Internship. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-6 credits. Must be repeated for a total of at least six credit hours. Enrollment requires completion of all other CLED courses required for program. Seminar and supervised field instruction experience for counselors in K-12 settings or professionals in postsecondary settings. Designed to extend professional competencies under supervision of an approved licensed professional school counselor (K-12 settings) or approved student services professional (postsecondary settings). A total of 600 clock hours is required.

CLED 720. Counselor Education Doctoral Seminar I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to students admitted to counselor education concentration of the Ph.D. in Education program. Theories and skills of leadership, advocacy models, advocacy action planning and social change theories. Models and methods of program evaluation are examined and evaluations designed and implemented as part of leadership and advocacy efforts. Students demonstrate the ability to provide or contribute to leadership efforts of professional organizations/programs and to advocate for the counseling profession and its clientele.

CLED 721. Counselor Education Doctoral Seminar II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Restricted to students admitted to counselor education concentration of the Ph.D. in Education program. Instructional theory, counselor education methods and multicultural pedagogy, and the roles, responsibilities and activities of counselor educators. Students demonstrate course design, delivery and evaluation methods. Students also develop their professional writing skills and demonstrate the ability to write for journals, newsletters, presentation proposals and grant proposals related to the teaching and training of counselors.

CLED 730. Advanced Counseling Theories and Practicum. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours and 100 on-site hours. 3 credits. Pre- or corequisite: CLED 720. Restricted to students admitted to counselor education concentration of the Ph.D. in Education program. Theories pertaining to the principles and practice of counseling, systems work, consultation and responding to crises, disasters and other trauma-causing events. Students demonstrate, at an advanced level, effective application of multiple counseling theories and interventions across diverse populations and settings, as well as advanced case conceptualization. This course includes a supervised 100-hour doctoral-level practicum.

CLED 740. Supervision in Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CLED 730; pre- or corequisite: CLED 721. Restricted to students admitted to counselor education concentration of the Ph.D. in Education program. Purposes, theoretical frameworks, models, roles of relationship, and practices of counselor/ clinical supervision. Students develop and demonstrate the application of theory and skills of clinical supervision as they refine their personal style of supervision.

CLED 750. Advanced Group Counseling. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CLED 740. Restricted to students admitted to counselor education concentration of the Ph.D. in Education program. Therapeutic factors of group work, theories of group work, including group counseling, evaluation of group work, group leadership characteristics, styles and behaviors. Students will demonstrate advanced group work skills and the ability to evaluate group climate, group leadership, group process and group outcomes.

CLED 760. Advanced Career Counseling and Development. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: CLED 740; pre- or corequisite: CLED 750. Restricted to students admitted to counselor education concentration of the Ph.D. in Education program. Principles and practice of career counseling, career counselor supervision and career program development beyond the beginning level. Students will demonstrate advanced career counseling work with a client, and beginning-level career counseling supervision. Part of this course includes developing and writing an article for publication based upon a theory-based career intervention structured in social justice and advocacy.

CLED 810. Counselor Education Doctoral Internship. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-4 credits. May be taken for a total of 6 credits. Prerequisite: CLED 760. Restricted to students admitted to counselor education concentration of the Ph.D. in Education program. Supervised experiences in counselor education and supervision (e.g., clinical practice, supervision, research and/or teaching). Internship is at the discretion and approval of the doctoral adviser and is based on student experience, training and career goals. The setting, goals, site supervisor and plan for the internship must be approved by the doctoral adviser. Students receive weekly supervision from their site supervisor and group supervision from a counselor education faculty member.

Special education and disability policy

SEDP 501. Characteristics of Students with High Incidence Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course, delivered online, face-to-face or hybrid; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Focuses on characteristics and identification of individuals with learning disabilities, emotional disturbance, intellectual disabilities, developmental delay, the less severe autism spectrum disorders, traumatic brain injury and other health impairments throughout the lifespan, as well as providing information on effective educational, psychosocial and behavioral interventions that serve as adaptations to the general curriculum. The possibilities of co-morbid or multiple conditions, coupled with cross-categorical instructional settings warrant a class that examines all eligibility categories of students served under the special education, general curriculum.

SEDP 502. Supervision Seminar I. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. This course emphasizes effective techniques to use when working with special education and general education teachers, instructional assistants, parent and students with disabilities. Participants will examine the different roles of the special educator. Class members are encouraged to introduce topics for discussion based on their teaching experiences. Problem-solving strategies will be developed to address the issues raised during class. The course will provide the special educator with an understanding of the Individualized Education Program process from fostering consensus to developing the IEP. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the impact of the student’s disability in accessing the general curriculum. Developing a data-driven IEP based on standards will also be emphasized.

SEDP 503. Supervision Seminar II. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. This course emphasizes effective techniques to use when working with special education and general education teachers, instructional assistants, parent and students with disabilities. Participants will examine the different roles of the special educator. Class members are encouraged to introduce topics for discussion based on their teaching experiences. Problem-solving strategies will be developed to address the issues raised during class. The course will provide the special educator with an understanding of how to implement mandates in the classroom as related to the state assessment program. Participants will learn why there is an emphasis on the development of standards-based IEPs and how they are integrated in daily classroom instruction. Participants will also learn about the different SOL participation options and how to use criteria to determine the appropriate option.

SEDP 505. Theory and Practice of Educating Individuals with Special Needs. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Not for certification or endorsement in special education. In-depth study of past and current philosophies and approaches to serving students with special needs in educational settings. Attends to specific ways school services and classroom practices of general education teaching can assist in meeting these needs in today's schools through collaboration and inclusion.

SEDP 531. Educational Foundations for Collaboration and Universally Designed Learning. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Delivered as online, face-to-face or hybrid course. Focuses on providing candidates with the knowledge of the foundation for educating students with disabilities, as well as the principles and processes for collaboration and consultation with educational colleagues, community professionals and families. Covers the historical, philosophical and sociological foundations underlying the role, development and organization of public education in the U.S. Discussions and readings will focus on creating and maintaining inclusive schools, effective communication strategies for building successful collaborative teams and universally designed instructional strategies to use in co-taught classrooms.

SEDP 532. Understanding Autism Spectrum Disorder. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course presents an introduction to autism spectrum disorder. The course will include a discussion of the core behavioral and secondary characteristics and how they impact the individual across the lifespan, from infancy through adulthood. Family concerns and considerations will be discussed in the context of age, development and need for support. The course will also describe the qualities of intervention strategies and will outline ways to evaluate practices and make sound intervention decisions.

SEDP 533. Educational Assessment of Individuals with Diverse Learning Needs. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Delivered as online, face-to-face or hybrid course. Focuses on current assessment theory, procedures and instruments used to evaluate students with high incidence disabilities in grades K through 12. The examination of both formal and informal assessment and their application in an educational setting and the designing of IEPs will be emphasized. Course will include the historical, philosophical and sociological foundations of the instructional design based on assessment data (relationships among assessment, instruction and monitoring student progress to include student performance measures in grading practices, the ability to construct and interpret valid assessments using a variety of formats in order to measure student attainment of essential skills in a standards-based environment, and the ability to analyze assessment data to make decisions about how to improve instruction and student performance).

SEDP 600. Language/Communication Intervention for Young Children and Individuals with Severe Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. An intensive study of the developmental sequence of language/communication acquisition and intervention strategies for individuals with severe language delays or deficits, severe intellectual disabilities and/or other severe multiple disabilities.

SEDP 601. Methods I: Teaching Students in Special Education - General Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Delivered as online, face-to-face or hybrid course. Provides an introduction to instructional strategies and organization of activities, including curriculum, media, materials and physical environment for children in grades K-12 with high incidence disabilities. Candidates will develop skills to plan and deliver instruction in a variety of educational settings such as inclusive classrooms, resource rooms, self-contained classes and residential programs.

SEDP 602. Methods II: Teaching Students in Special Education - General Education. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Delivered as online, face-to-face or hybrid course. Prerequisites: SEDP 601 and acceptance for teacher preparation if in the M.Ed. program. Provides a study of instructional strategies and organization of activities with focus on elementary and secondary students with high incidence disabilities (in grades K-12) including curriculum, media, materials and physical environment. Candidates will use the foundation from Methods I as a context for developing skills necessary to provide the most effective classroom instruction for secondary students. A continued focus will be on assessing and monitoring student performance, adapting instructional interventions based upon students' response to intervention, and selecting evidence-based practices that have the greatest likelihood of success.

SEDP 603. Theories, Assessment and Practices in Reading for Students With High Incidence Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Delivered as online, face-to-face or hybrid course. Prerequisite: TEDU 561. Designed to prepare special education teachers to instruct students with high incidence disabilities who exhibit reading deficits. Strategies, techniques and methods will be analyzed for their appropriate use with different types of reading/language problems. The course includes assessment practices and use of instruments that form the basis for instructional planning.

SEDP 604. Characteristics of Students With Severe Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment restricted to students who have been admitted to the Virginia Consortium for Teacher Preparation in Special Education Adapted Curriculum. Examines nature and causes of disabling or special health conditions. Covers screening and evaluation techniques, characteristics and educational implications.

SEDP 610. Teaching Strategies for Students with Severe Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed to provide instruction in teaching methods for individuals with severe behavior, learning or emotional disabilities. Emphasis will be placed on instructional program development, task analysis and methods of precision teaching.

SEDP 611. Secondary Education and Transition Planning. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture hours. 2 credits. Delivered as online, face-to-face or hybrid course. Explores the literature, research, issues and trends that are relevant to high school-aged students with high incidence disabilities as they prepare for their transition to life after high school. Focus is on providing candidates with the ability to prepare their students and work with their families to promote successful student transitions throughout the educational experience including postsecondary training, employment and independent living that addresses an understanding of long-term planning, career development, life skills, community experiences and resources, self-advocacy and self-determination, guardianship, and legal considerations. The full range of functioning is addressed in the areas of education, employment, social/emotional functioning, personal and daily living issues.

SEDP 612. Assessment and Curriculum for Students with Severe Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Addresses functional assessment strategies, IEP development, and curriculum organization and implementation for students with severe disabilities. Emphasizes educating learners in the least restrictive environment using a transdisciplinary team approach.

SEDP 616. Introduction to Disability Studies, Community Services and Business Networks. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines disability history, theory and current thinking in the field of disability studies. Changes in philosophy, legislation and policy over the past four decades will be examined to trace the paradigm shift that led to our current conceptualization of disability. Students will investigate the community services and resources available to support adults with disabilities, as well as new trends in business partnerships and employment service models that promote the economic self-sufficiency of adults with disabilities.

SEDP 619. Multicultural Perspectives in Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Designed to enhance cultural competence in diverse classrooms and schools. Major considerations include race, ethnicity, linguistic, gender, abilities and sexual orientation differences. Key concepts include structural, curricular and instructional facets of working successfully in diverse educational settings. Personal and theoretical constructs of race, ethnicity, culture, disability and other related concepts are explored. This course is delivered online. Crosslisted as: TEDU 619.

SEDP 621. Applied Behavior Analysis: Principals, Procedures and Philosophy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Designed to provide an overview of the basic principles and procedures of applied behavior analysis. Factors and principles that contribute to improved performance as well as development of interfering behaviors are identified. Further procedures that can be used to minimize interfering behavior, improve performance, teach new behaviors and increase the probability of behaviors occurring under appropriate circumstances are described.

SEDP 622. Ethics and Professional Conduct for Behavior Analysts. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Pre- or corequisite: SEDP 621. Provides an overview of the professional conduct standards consistent with the practices of applied behavior analysis and outlines how to provide ethical and responsible behavioral programming. The Virginia Behavior Analyst Licensure law, the Behavior Analyst Certification Board's Guidelines for Responsible Conduct and Disciplinary Standards, as well as the Association for Positive Behavior Supports Standards of Practice are reviewed and used to guide course content. A focus is placed on developing and implementing ethical behavioral programming that promotes the improvement as well as the dignity of the person receiving intervention. Ethical conduct as it relates to colleagues, the field of ABA and society also is discussed.

SEDP 623. Applied Behavior Analysis: Empirical Bases. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Pre- or corequisite: SEDP 621. Provides information on the basic content of applied behavior analysis and how to implement the core principles in real-life situations. Participants will be instructed on how to implement behavioral procedures and develop behavioral programs for individuals who may need to increase positive skills or reduce interfering behavior. Participants also will be instructed on single-subject design, the research methodology used in the field of ABA and its applications in real-life situations.

SEDP 624. Applied Behavior Analysis: Applications. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Pre- or corequisite: SEDP 621. Discusses the various applications of the field of applied behavior analysis and expands the capability to deal with more complex behavioral situations, enabling the ability to relate to more sophisticated professional issues and environments. Specifically, the course demonstrates how ABA is applied in real-world situations to make socially significant changes by minimizing interfering behavior, improving performance, teaching new behaviors and increasing the probability of behaviors occurring under appropriate circumstances. This course also provides a foundation for giving appropriate support to those implementing the behavior plan.

SEDP 625. Applied Behavior Analysis: Assessments and Interventions. 3 Hours.

Semester course. 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Pre- or corequisite: SEDP 621. Expands on basic content of applied behavior analysis and teaches how to implement behavioral procedures and develop behavioral programs for individuals with fundamental socially relevant behavioral needs. In this course, participants will learn how to implement behavioral assessments, select and develop intervention procedures, and compose instructions for implementation.

SEDP 626. Applied Behavior Analysis: Verbal Behavior. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Pre- or corequisite: SEDP 621. Further expands the participant's capability to use applied behavior analysis in complex behavioral situations and enables students to apply principles to sophisticated issues through analysis of language development. The course will provide information on verbal behavior and basic verbal operants and how to develop intervention procedures to teach diverse learners.

SEDP 630. Trends in Special Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Includes an overview of legislation and case law pertaining to special education, characteristics of individuals with and without exceptionalities including growth and development from birth though adolescence, mainstreaming, integration/inclusion, transition, and classroom adaptations for educating students with disabilities in least restrictive environments. Candidates will become familiar with the general characteristics of children with and without exceptionalities relative to age, varying levels of severity and developmental differences manifested in cognitive, linguistic, physical, psychomotor, social or emotional functioning.

SEDP 631. Classroom Management and Behavior Support for Students with Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Delivered as online, face-to-face or hybrid course. Provides an in-depth analysis of theoretical models, research and strategies for supporting positive behavior of students with various disabilities. Emphasis is on developing, implementing and evaluating behavior management programs in special education programs including functional assessment of behavior. This course will help develop a candidate's ideas about examining the behaviors of students with special needs in school settings, including an understanding and application of classroom and behavior management techniques and individual interventions. Techniques and approaches taught will promote skills that are consistent with norms, standards and rules of the educational environment and will be diverse based upon behavioral cognitive, affective, social and ecological theory and practice. As part of the course requirements, candidates complete approved modules in child abuse and neglect recognition and intervention.

SEDP 632. Transition Strategies for Students with Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Designed to provide knowledge of the special educator's role in preparing students with disabilities for post-secondary educational and vocational environments. Emphasis is placed on designing and modifying high school curricula involving students and their families in transition planning and helping students acquire the services needed to be successful in adult life.

SEDP 634. Assessment, Curriculum and Teaching Methods for Autism Spectrum Disorder. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SEDP 532. Students will review assessment techniques and curriculum design, as well as the major methodologies to teach individuals with autism spectrum disorder from early intervention through transition to adult services in inclusive and specialized educational settings. This course will focus on scientifically based interventions that address the communication development and academic needs of the individual with autism spectrum disorder. Participants will be required to demonstrate knowledge of course goals by integrating content with students with autism spectrum disorder.

SEDP 635. Supporting Behavior and Social Skills for Autism Spectrum Disorder. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SEDP 532. Students will review major methodologies needed to create a positive social and emotional learning environment for individuals with autism spectrum disorder from early intervention through transition to adult services in inclusive and specialized educational settings. This course will address the individual’s social, behavioral and sensory needs by focusing on the emerging best-practice interventions needed to teach social understanding and shape appropriate social behavior, build play and leisure skills, teach anger and stress management, procure sensory motor modulation, conduct functional behavior assessments, and provide positive behavior support. Participants will be required to demonstrate knowledge of course goals through integration with students with autism spectrum disorder.

SEDP 638. Instructional Design and Field Experience for Autism Spectrum Disorder. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: SEDP 532, 634 and 635. Students will focus on the integration of theoretical and practical concepts related to supporting individuals with autism spectrum disorder from early intervention through transition to adult services in educational settings. It provides the opportunity to apply knowledge of assessment, curriculum design, teaching methodologies and environmental and technological supports while working collaboratively with caregivers and educational teams to develop individualized programming. This course has a 20-hour field-based experience that is to take place in an educational setting. The field-based experience will be coordinated with the course instructor.

SEDP 641. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. An individual study of a specialized issue or problem in education.

SEDP 651. Topics in Education. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. May be repeated for 9 credits. Check with department for specific prerequisites. A course for the examination of specialized issues, topics, readings or problems in education.

SEDP 658. Educating Students with Physical and Sensory Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines the educational, social, physical, and health care needs of students who possess both cognitive and physical/sensory disabilities. Focuses on specific strategies for positioning and handling students, assessing skills and developing goals collaboratively. Emphasizes techniques for meeting the needs of students with deaf-blindness and students with special health-care needs.

SEDP 700. Externship. 1-6 Hours.

Semester course; 1-6 lecture hours. 1-6 credits. The externship experience for M.Ed. candidates requires the study and integration of theory with practice in a clinical setting supervised by an approved professional and university faculty member. This externship includes planned site visits by the university faculty member (at least four of the visits will be observations of the student in a teaching situation). During the semester-long externship, students are in classrooms with a set amount of hours spent supervised by a fully licensed, experienced teacher in direct teaching activities. Any other externship configuration can only be done with the permission of the severe disabilities program coordinator. The supervision provided emphasizes effective techniques to use when working with special education and general education teachers, instructional assistants, parents and students with disabilities.

SEDP 705. Seminar on Disability Policy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Discussion and examination of key federal and state issues that affect disability policy and program management. Includes an in-depth examination of IDEA, ADA and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.

SEDP 706. Personnel Development in Special Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prepares individuals to effectively design, provide and evaluate personnel development programs that prepare professionals to maximize the developmental, educational, emotional and employment outcomes of individuals with disabilities.

SEDP 707. Critical Issues in Special Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Discussion and examination of controversial and/or critical issues in special education, as well as current IDEA definitions, referral and assessment methods and instructional models.

SEDP 708. Grant Writing in Special Education and Other Social Sciences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines conceptual, empirical and practical issues in the preparation of grant proposals and in the conduct of interdisciplinary research in the social sciences that focuses on education and related issues in youth development, with a specific emphasis on youth with disabilities. Students will develop practical skills in establishing interdisciplinary research teams; interdisciplinary research design and grant proposal development; matching research questions to funding agencies and their priorities; working with community agencies and relevant stakeholders to secure their involvement in the research process; writing research or training grant proposals.

SEDP 709. Literature Reviews in Special Education and Other Social Sciences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Provides in-depth, advanced instruction in the conducting of systematic literature reviews; instruction in how to create and refine a research question; instruction in defining and refining search terms; instruction in critically analyzing identified literature; and instruction in the writing and structure of a literature review.

SEDP 711. Doctoral Seminar in Single Subject Design. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is intended to provide an overview of strategies for designing and conducting single subject studies that are relevant to education, special education, psychology and other related fields of inquiry. Its purpose is to provide doctoral students or advanced graduate students who are interested in applied research designs with an opportunity to acquire competencies related to planning, implementing and analyzing such research. The content of the course will focus on applications and interpretations of single-case research designs and the analysis of human behavior in educational and community settings. This course is designed as an initial course in single research design.

SEDP 771. Research Internship. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 research hours. 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a total of 3 credits. Enrollment requires prior approval of adviser. The research internship is designed to provide doctoral students with an opportunity to demonstrate competence at designing and conducting a pilot research study and disseminating research findings. Graded as S/U/F.

SEDP 772. Teaching Internship. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 internship hours. 1-3 credits. Enrollment requires prior approval of adviser. The teaching internship is designed to provide doctoral students with an opportunity to demonstrate competence in the activities related to the preparation of teachers of students with disabilities at the university level. Graded as S/U/F.

SEDP 773. Service/Policy Internship. 1-2 Hours.

Semester course; 1-2 hours of internship. 1-2 credits. Enrollment requires prior approval of adviser. The service competency is met through an internship that is designed to give doctoral candidates an intensive experience in which they can become actively involved in professional service to the field of special education and, in particular, in the development and implementation of local, state or national policy. Graded as S/U/F.

SEDP 890. Dissertation Prospectus Preparation. 1 Hour.

Semester course; 1 lecture hour. 1 credit. Prerequisite: SEDP 709 Students will receive guidance in the preparation of their dissertation prospectus, describing their plan for conducting an original research study as the final requirement for their Ph.D. in Special Education and Disability Policy. Graded S/U/F.

SEDP 899. Dissertation. 1-9 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. Variable credit. May be repeated. A minimum of 9 semester hours required. Prerequisite: Successful completion of comprehensive examinations and approval of student's doctoral prospectus. Dissertation work under direction of dissertation committee. Graded as S/U/F.