The Department of Craft and Material Studies offers a professionally oriented program that leads to a Bachelor of Fine Arts with focus areas in ceramics, fiberwork/fabric design, glassworking, metalsmithing/jewelry or woodworking/furniture design. Within these areas of specialization, courses are designed to assist students in developing concepts, personal direction, and the necessary skills and technical competencies to enable them to pursue a professional career or graduate study. In addition to the areas of study, students have the opportunity for a diverse education in the liberal arts and humanities. Students are encouraged to select courses in other schools in the university that will add to their general knowledge. A student may elect a minor area of study in any department or program offering a minor. The minor can be used to fulfill career objectives or to investigate a discipline of secondary interest.

Career opportunities for craft majors include setting up an independent studio or gallery, restoration or repair work, teaching or participating in the Artist-in-Residence programs in the public schools, and consulting and designing for industry.

Learning outcomes

Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following:

  1. An understanding of aesthetic and multicultural issues: The students will demonstrate an understanding and proficiency in craft, design, art and issues.
  2. An understanding of the contemporary field of craft: Students will demonstrate and understand the symbolic relationship and potential impact of contemporary craft and art on culture.
  3. Develop and utilize critique skills: The students will be able to use knowledge gained from critique to improve creative work.
  4. Technical development and proficiency: The students will demonstrate proficiency of basic, intermediate and advanced craft techniques within their specific field media.
  5. Professional practice: The students will demonstrate an understanding of the career demands of a contemporary craft artist, and how to pursue a career through multiple paths.
  6. Become skilled maker: Students will be able to develop and articulate their own ideas — conceptual and formal — via conversation, presentation skills and writing.
  7. Independent reflection: The students will develop an understanding in their ability to interpret their individual motivation in their artwork and studio practice.

Special requirements

The Bachelor of Fine Arts in Craft and Material Studies requires a minimum of 120 credits, including 49 in the major. A minimum of 45 of the 120 credits must be 300- and/or 400-level courses. To be admitted into the major, students must successfully complete Art Foundation requirements. Students become affiliated with a major department after the departmental portfolio reviews in the spring semester of the Art Foundation year. At that time the student applies to the department of his or her choice. Department acceptance is competitive and is based on individual student performance and potential in their chosen area. To enroll in an advanced-level craft course, majors must have earned a minimum grade of C in all courses prerequisite for that course.

Degree requirements for Craft and Material Studies, Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.)

General Education requirements

University Core Education Curriculum
UNIV   111 Play VideoPlay course video for Focused Inquiry IFocused Inquiry I3
UNIV   112 Play VideoPlay course video for Focused Inquiry IIFocused Inquiry II3
UNIV   200Inquiry and the Craft of Argument3
Approved humanities/fine arts3
Approved natural/physical sciences3-4
Approved quantitative literacy3-4
Approved social/behavioral sciences3-4
Total Hours21-24
Additional School of the Arts requirement
ENGL   215Textual Analysis3
General Education electives: (Select six credits from approved University Core courses.)6
Total Hours9

Collateral requirements

Art Foundation requirements
ARTF   131Drawing Studio3
ARTF   132Surface Research3
ARTF   133Space Research3
ARTF   134Time Studio3
ARTF   139Project2
Art History Foundation year requirements
ARTH   103Survey of Art I3
ARTH   104Survey of Art II3
ARTH electives
Select six credit hours from: ARTH 145-ARTH 5996
ARTH non-Western topic
Select three credit hours from list below3
Other arts requirement
Select four credit hours from PAPR   205-PAPR   491 and/or SCPT   211-SCPT   4914
Total Hours33

Major requirements

CRAF   282Sophomore Seminar3
CRAF   382Junior Seminar3
CRAF   480Senior Studio/Critique Course4
CRAF   482Senior Seminar (capstone)3
Basic craft: Select 12 credit hours from list below12
Advanced craft: Select 24 credit hours from list below24
Total Hours49

Open electives

Select eight open elective credits8

Total minimum requirement 120 credits

Electives

Art history non-Western
ARTH   207Introduction to Non-Western Art3
ARTH   245Survey of Asian Art3
ARTH   301Art and Architecture of Ancient North America3
ARTH   335Pre-Columbian Art and Architecture3
ARTH   342African-American Art3
ARTH   345The Art of India3
ARTH   347Studies in Asian Art3
ARTH   350African and Oceanic Art3
ARTH   358African Art and Architecture3
ARTH   440Contemporary Art and Architecture of Africa3
ARTH   449Studies in Asian Art3
ARTH   450Art and Architecture of Mesoamerica3
ARTH   451Art and Architecture of Andean America3
ARTH   452Studies in Pre-Columbian Art and Architecture3
ARTH   454Studies in African and Oceanic Art3
Basic craft
CRAF   211Jewelry4
CRAF   221Woodworking Techniques4
CRAF   240Introduction to Ceramics4
CRAF   250Introduction to Glass Fabrication4
CRAF   251Introduction to Glassworking4
CRAF   252Introduction to Glassworking4
CRAF   260Introduction to Textiles4
CRAF   261Beginning Textiles4
CRAF   262Beginning Textiles4
Advanced craft
CRAF   301Advanced Metal Fabrication: Forming4
CRAF   302Advanced Metal Fabrication: Mechanisms4
CRAF   303Advanced Metal Fabrication: Surface Techniques4
CRAF   304Advanced Metal Fabrication: Casting and Stone Setting4
CRAF   320Furniture Design4
CRAF   321Advanced Woodworking and Furniture Design4
CRAF   322Advanced Woodworking and Furniture Design4
CRAF   341Advanced Ceramics4,6
CRAF   342Advanced Ceramics4,6
CRAF   343The Figure in Clay4
CRAF   344Ceramics: Mold-Making4
CRAF   351Intermediate Glass Fabrication/Hot4
CRAF   352Intermediate Glass Fabrication/Kiln Forming4
CRAF   353Glassworking: Lampworking4
CRAF   354Intermediate Glass Fabrication4
CRAF   361Intermediate Textiles: Tapestry/Weaving4
CRAF   362Intermediate Textiles: Pattern Weaving4
CRAF   363Fabric Design I4
CRAF   364Fabric Design II4
CRAF   369Ancient Peruvian Textile Techniques4
CRAF   401Advanced Metalsmithing or Jewelry4,6
CRAF   402Advanced Metalsmithing or Jewelry4,6
CRAF   421Advanced Woodworking and Furniture Design4,6
CRAF   422Advanced Woodworking and Furniture Design4,6
CRAF   441Advanced Ceramics4,6
CRAF   442Advanced Ceramics4,6
CRAF   446Glaze Technology3
CRAF   447Ceramic Technology: Clay, Claybodies and Slips3
CRAF   451Glassworking4,6
CRAF   452Glassworking4,6
CRAF   455Glass Through Time3
CRAF   461Advanced Textile Studio4,6
CRAF   462Advanced Textile Studio4,6
CRAF   463Advanced Fabric Design4
CRAF   464Advanced Fabric Design4
CRAF   481Senior Studio/Critique Course4
CRAF   491Topics in Craft/Material Studies1-3
CRAF   492Independent Study1-3
CRAF   493Fieldwork3
CRAF   494Fieldwork6
CRAF   591Special Topics and Practicum1-3

What follows is a sample plan that meets the prescribed requirements within a four-year course of study at VCU. Please contact your adviser before beginning course work toward a degree.

Freshman year
Fall semesterHours
ARTF   131 Drawing Studio 3
ARTF   132 Surface Research 3
ARTF   139 Project 1
ARTH   103 Survey of Art I 3
UNIV   111 Play VideoPlay course video for Focused Inquiry I Focused Inquiry I 3
Quantitative literacy course (University Core) 3
 Term Hours: 16
Spring semester
ARTF   133 Space Research 3
ARTF   134 Time Studio 3
ARTF   139 Project 1
ARTH   104 Survey of Art II 3
UNIV   112 Play VideoPlay course video for Focused Inquiry II Focused Inquiry II 3
Social/behavioral sciences course (University Core) 3
 Term Hours: 16
Sophomore year
Fall semester
CRAF   282 Sophomore Seminar 3
UNIV   200 Inquiry and the Craft of Argument 3
PAPR or SCPT (PAPR 205-PAPR 491 or SCPT 211-SCPT 491) 2
Basic craft 4
Humanities/fine arts course (University Core) 3
 Term Hours: 15
Spring semester
ARTH non-Western topic 3
PAPR or SCPT (PAPR 205-PAPR 491 or SCPT 211-SCPT 491) 1
Basic craft 8
Natural/physical sciences course (University Core) 3
 Term Hours: 15
Junior year
Fall semester
CRAF   382 Junior Seminar 3
ENGL   215 Textual Analysis 3
PAPR or SCPT 1
Advanced craft 8
 Term Hours: 15
Spring semester
ARTH elective (ARTH 145-ARTH 599) 3
Advanced craft 8
General education elective 3
 Term Hours: 14
Senior year
Fall semester
CRAF   482 Senior Seminar (capstone) 3
ARTH elective (ARTH 145-ARTH 599) 3
Advanced craft 4
General education elective 3
Open electives 2
 Term Hours: 15
Spring semester
CRAF   480 Senior Studio/Critique Course 4
Advanced craft 4
Open electives 6
 Term Hours: 14
 Total Hours: 120

CRAF   201. Metalsmithing. 4 Hours.

Continuous courses; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4-4 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program; completion of CRAF   201 to enroll in CRAF   202. Investigation of metal forming processes such as forging, raising and construction. Research in contemporary and historical metal forms.

CRAF   202. Metalsmithing. 4 Hours.

Continuous courses; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4-4 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program; completion of CRAF   201 to enroll in CRAF   202. Investigation of metal forming processes such as forging, raising and construction. Research in contemporary and historical metal forms.

CRAF   211. Jewelry. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program. Investigation of basic jewelry making processes such as construction, chasing, surface embellishment and basic stone setting. Research in contemporary and historical jewelry forms.

CRAF   221. Woodworking Techniques. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program. Introduction to techniques of woodworking. Includes the use of hand tools; hand and machine joinery; shaping and carving; finishing; and techniques involving jigs and fixtures. Students participate in studio work.

CRAF   240. Introduction to Ceramics. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program. Introduction to beginning processes of wheel throwing and hand-built construction techniques, design, aesthetics and the creative development of clay objects examining cultural, historical and personal modes of expression. Demonstrations and slide presentations are given for assignments along with handouts to assist in illustrating techniques and processes. Students will be introduced to various ceramic aesthetics in contemporary, social and historical context.

CRAF   241. Ceramics: Handbuilding. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program. Basic construction techniques for fabricating ceramic objects. Includes mold-making, slip casting and press-molding as well as the use and application of low-fire slips, underglazes, glazes and the firing of these objects in kilns.

CRAF   242. Ceramics: Wheelthrowing. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program. Introduction to the use of the potter's wheel. The objective is to develop the skill, dexterity and coordination required to use the wheel as one tool of the ceramic forming process. Includes the properties and uses of high-fire clays and glazes. Students participate in kiln firings.

CRAF   250. Introduction to Glass Fabrication. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program. An introduction and investigation into the physical and associative material properties of glass. Students will explore a variety of methodologies for hot, cold and casting glass fabrication. The history and modern application of each technique will be covered through lectures, demonstrations and studio work.

CRAF   251. Introduction to Glassworking. 4 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4, 4 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program. An investigation of techniques, tools, equipment and materials involved in hot and cold glassworking processes. First semester covers basic molten-glass furnace techniques such as blowing and casting, mold-making and Pate de Verre (fusing crushed glass in a mold). Second semester explores colored glass fusing, use of enamels and glazes, mold-making for slumped forms and stained glass.

CRAF   252. Introduction to Glassworking. 4 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4, 4 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program. An investigation of techniques, tools, equipment and materials involved in hot and cold glassworking processes. First semester covers basic molten-glass furnace techniques such as blowing and casting, mold-making and Pate de Verre (fusing crushed glass in a mold). Second semester explores colored glass fusing, use of enamels and glazes, mold-making for slumped forms and stained glass.

CRAF   253. Introduction to Glassworking: Lampworking. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program. An investigation of techniques, tools, equipment and materials involved in glass lampworking processes. The course covers basic melting, shaping and blowing with a glass torch working process.

CRAF   260. Introduction to Textiles. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program. An introduction to basic textile techniques, tools and materials. This course introduces dyeing, weaving, felt-making, embroidery, sewing and related techniques. The history and modern application of each technique will be covered through lectures, demonstrations and studio work.

CRAF   261. Beginning Textiles. 4 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4, 4 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program. An introduction to basic textile techniques, tools and materials. CRAF   261 introduces tapestry, feltmaking, basketry and related techniques. CRAF   262 focuses on embroidery, silk painting, piecing and quilting, and related techniques. The history and modern application of each technique will be examined through lectures, demonstrations and studio work.

CRAF   262. Beginning Textiles. 4 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4, 4 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program. An introduction to basic textile techniques, tools and materials. CRAF   261 introduces tapestry, feltmaking, basketry and related techniques. CRAF   262 focuses on embroidery, silk painting, piecing and quilting, and related techniques. The history and modern application of each technique will be examined through lectures, demonstrations and studio work.

CRAF   282. Sophomore Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: successful completion of the Art Foundation Program. Introduction to the fields within the Department of Craft and Material Studies, critique practices, planning for arts career and writing within the field.

CRAF   301. Advanced Metal Fabrication: Forming. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   211 with a minimum grade of C. This course introduces students to various metal forming techniques. While cultivating respect for craft, the underlying theme of the course explores form as a means of expression for both functional and nonfunctional work. It is designed to develop skill, craftsmanship and sensitivity to design in working with metal. The history and modern application of each technique will be covered through lectures, demonstrations and studio work.

CRAF   302. Advanced Metal Fabrication: Mechanisms. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   211 with a minimum grade of C. This course introduces students to various fabrication techniques, findings and mechanisms related to the production of jewelry and small-scale objects. It is designed to develop skill, craftsmanship and sensitivity to design in working with metal. The history and modern application of each technique will be covered through lectures, demonstrations and studio work.

CRAF   303. Advanced Metal Fabrication: Surface Techniques. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   211 with a minimum grade of C. This course introduces students to various surface treatments employed in the production of jewelry and metal objects. It is designed to develop skill, craftsmanship and sensitivity to design in working with metal. While cultivating respect for craft, the underlying theme of the course explores form as a means of expression for both functional and nonfunctional work. The history and modern application of each technique will be covered through lectures, demonstrations and studio work.

CRAF   304. Advanced Metal Fabrication: Casting and Stone Setting. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   211 with a minimum grade of C. This course introduces students to casting and stone setting techniques employed in the production of jewelry and metal objects. It is designed to develop skill, craftsmanship and sensitivity to design in working with metal. While cultivating respect for craft, the underlying theme of the course explores form as a means of expression for both functional and nonfunctional work. The history and modern application of each technique will be covered through lectures, demonstrations and studio work.

CRAF   320. Furniture Design. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   221 with a minimum grade of C. The course explores the development of ideas through drawings, mock-ups and the planning and execution of a small furniture object utilizing basic and specialized woodworking techniques.

CRAF   321. Advanced Woodworking and Furniture Design. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   320 with a minimum grade of C. Advanced design and construction investigation of varied materials and machine processes.

CRAF   322. Advanced Woodworking and Furniture Design. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   320 with a minimum grade of C. Advanced design and construction investigation of varied materials and machine processes.

CRAF   341. Advanced Ceramics. 4,6 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 or 12 studio hours. 4 or 6 credits. Each of the courses may be repeated for up to a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   240 with a minimum grade of C. Advanced problems in the design and production of functional and nonfunctional ceramic products.

CRAF   342. Advanced Ceramics. 4,6 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 or 12 studio hours. 4 or 6 credits. Each of the courses may be repeated for up to a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   240 with a minimum grade of C. Advanced problems in the design and production of functional and nonfunctional ceramic products.

CRAF   343. The Figure in Clay. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   240 with a minimum grade of C. This course is a continuation of study in ceramics with a focus on the figure in clay. While cultivating respect for craft, the underlying theme of the course explores the figure in clay as a means of expression in an art-making medium. The history and modern application of each hand-building technique will be covered through lectures, demonstrations and studio work.

CRAF   344. Ceramics: Mold-Making. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   240 with a minimum grade of C. This course is a continuation of study in ceramics with a focus on prototyping and mold-making techniques. While focused on generating original artwork, the course will cover prototype development and serialized production using a variety of mold-forming processes. The history and contemporary application of ceramic mold-making techniques will be covered through student research, demonstrations and studio work.

CRAF   351. Intermediate Glass Fabrication/Hot. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   250 with a minimum grade of C. A deeper and broader delving into hot and cold glass fabrication techniques, with an introduction to the utilization and application of color processes will be explored.

CRAF   352. Intermediate Glass Fabrication/Kiln Forming. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   250 with a minimum grade of C. A deeper exploration of warm glass (kiln forming) processes that will involve advanced mold-making techniques.

CRAF   353. Glassworking: Lampworking. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for up to a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   251, 252 or 253, with a minimum grade of C. Provides an opportunity for further investigation, specialization and technical mastery in glass lampworking design.

CRAF   354. Intermediate Glass Fabrication. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   351 or 352 with a minimum grade of C. A deeper and broader delving into hot and cold glass fabrication techniques, with an introduction to the utilization and application a multigenerational approach to image realization will be extensively investigated.

CRAF   361. Intermediate Textiles: Tapestry/Weaving. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   260 with a minimum grade of C. An introduction to the floor loom with an emphasis on tapestry weaving. Concentrated studio work in contemporary and traditional loom techniques along with continuing individual investigation of other textile techniques.

CRAF   362. Intermediate Textiles: Pattern Weaving. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   260 with a minimum grade of C. An introduction to the floor loom with an emphasis on pattern weaving. Concentrated studio work in contemporary and traditional loom techniques along with continuing individual investigation of other textile techniques.

CRAF   363. Fabric Design I. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   260 with a minimum grade of C. Exploration of dye and pigment techniques for fabric along with pattern development and conceptual use of fabric.

CRAF   364. Fabric Design II. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   260 with a minimum grade of C. Exploration of dye and pigment techniques for fabric along with pattern development and conceptual use of fabric.

CRAF   367. Tapestry. 4 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4, 4 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Origins of tapestry forms and execution of techniques.

CRAF   368. Tapestry. 4 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4, 4 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Origins of tapestry forms and execution of techniques.

CRAF   369. Ancient Peruvian Textile Techniques. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 or 12 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. An examination of textile techniques perfected in ancient Peru and their application to contemporary fiber work. Pre-Columbian cultures will be studied to understand textile development. Course includes student duplication of techniques to better understand "structure" and the production of a personal object(s) utilizing these techniques and information.

CRAF   382. Junior Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: CRAF   282 and UNIV   200 or HONR   200. Continued investigation of the craft field, critique practices, planning for careers through the lens of creativity and exploration, and a continuation of writing in the field.

CRAF   401. Advanced Metalsmithing or Jewelry. 4,6 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 or 12 studio hours. 4 or 6 credits. Each of the courses may be repeated up to a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   211 with a minimum grade of C. These courses offer opportunity for specialization and development of techniques.

CRAF   402. Advanced Metalsmithing or Jewelry. 4,6 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 or 12 studio hours. 4 or 6 credits. Each of the courses may be repeated up to a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   211 with a minimum grade of C. These courses offer opportunity for specialization and development of techniques.

CRAF   409. Summer Metal and Jewelry Workshop. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3, 6 or 9 studio hours. 1, 2 or 3 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Exploration of specific metal processes and techniques such as fabrication, forging, forming, casting, enameling and electroforming. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

CRAF   421. Advanced Woodworking and Furniture Design. 4,6 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 or 12 studio hours. 4 or 6 credits. Each of the courses may be repeated for up to a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   320 with a minimum grade of C. Advanced design and construction investigation of varied materials and machine processes.

CRAF   422. Advanced Woodworking and Furniture Design. 4,6 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 or 12 studio hours. 4 or 6 credits. Each of the courses may be repeated for up to a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   320 with a minimum grade of C. Advanced design and construction investigation of varied materials and machine processes.

CRAF   429. Summer Woodworking Workshop. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 3, 6 or 9 studio hours. 1, 2 or 3 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Exploration of specific woodworking processes and techniques such as joinery methods, laminate bending, steambending, etc. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

CRAF   441. Advanced Ceramics. 4,6 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 or 12 studio hours. 4 or 6 credits. Each of the courses may be repeated for up to a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   240 with a minimum grade of C. Advanced problems in the design and production of functional and nonfunctional ceramic products.

CRAF   442. Advanced Ceramics. 4,6 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 or 12 studio hours. 4 or 6 credits. Each of the courses may be repeated for up to a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   240 with a minimum grade of C. Advanced problems in the design and production of functional and nonfunctional ceramic products.

CRAF   446. Glaze Technology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Development, formulation and application of ceramic glazes. The technology includes high, medium and low firing ranges as well as color and analysis of glaze materials.

CRAF   447. Ceramic Technology: Clay, Claybodies and Slips. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Study of clay from geological origins to practical application. Course includes development and application of clay bodies in different firing ranges, englobes and slips.

CRAF   448. Ceramic Workshop. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 9 studio hours. 3, 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Exploration in specific ceramic techniques such as raku, salt glaze, primitive firing and low temperature glazing.

CRAF   449. Ceramic Workshop. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 9 studio hours. 3, 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Exploration in specific ceramic techniques such as raku, salt glaze, primitive firing and low temperature glazing.

CRAF   451. Glassworking. 4,6 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 or 12 studio hours. 4 or 6 credits. Each of the courses may be repeated for up to a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   251 or 252, with a minimum grade of C. Opportunity for further investigation and specialization in glassworking design and technical mastery.

CRAF   452. Glassworking. 4,6 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 or 12 studio hours. 4 or 6 credits. Each of the courses may be repeated for up to a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   251 or 252, with a minimum grade of C. Opportunity for further investigation and specialization in glassworking design and technical mastery.

CRAF   455. Glass Through Time. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 1 studio hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. This class will be an in-depth examination of the application and utilization of the material glass throughout time. An inquiry into present and future artistic and architectural applications of the material will be explored.

CRAF   456. Survey of Glass. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 3 lecture hours. 3, 3 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. An examination of significant technological developments in glass from the past to present. First semester: ancient to 16th century. Second semester: 17th century to contemporary. Illustrated lectures.

CRAF   459. Summer Glassworking Workshop. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3, 6 or 9 studio hours. 1, 2 or 3 credits. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Exploration of specific glassworking processes, such as forming molten glass, casting and coldworking techniques. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

CRAF   461. Advanced Textile Studio. 4,6 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 or 12 studio hours. 4 or 6 credits for each course. Each course may be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   362 with a minimum grade of C. Emphasis on investigation of advanced technical skills along with development of a personal style.

CRAF   462. Advanced Textile Studio. 4,6 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 or 12 studio hours. 4 or 6 credits for each course. Each course may be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   362 with a minimum grade of C. Emphasis on investigation of advanced technical skills along with development of a personal style.

CRAF   463. Advanced Fabric Design. 4 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4, 4 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   364 with a minimum grade of C. Development of a personal direction with advance examination of dye applications.

CRAF   464. Advanced Fabric Design. 4 Hours.

Semester courses; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4, 4 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   364 with a minimum grade of C. Development of a personal direction with advance examination of dye applications.

CRAF   480. Senior Studio/Critique Course. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits. Prerequisites: completed 12 credits from CRAF   301-364 with a minimum grade of C. Corequisite: enrollment in 4 credits from CRAF   301, 302, 303, 304, 320, 321, 322, 341, 342, 351, 354, 361, 362, 363 or 364. Focuses on the development of independent interests aimed at creating a cohesive series/body of work.

CRAF   481. Senior Studio/Critique Course. 4 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 6 studio hours. 4 credits. Prerequisite: CRAF   480 with a minimum grade of C. The course will focus on the continuation of creating a cohesive series/body of work begun during CRAF   480.

CRAF   482. Senior Seminar. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: senior standing in the major and CRAF   382. Capstone course focusing on the continued investigation of the craft field with emphasis on the student’s media area(s) of focus and professional practices.

CRAF   491. Topics in Craft/Material Studies. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. A seminar or workshop on a selected issue or topic in the field of crafts. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

CRAF   492. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisites: senior standing in the major and permission of the instructor. The student will pursue advanced, individually directed study on a subject to be formulated in writing by the student and instructor.

CRAF   493. Fieldwork. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 135 clock hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: senior standing in the major and permission of department chair. Opportunity for practical work experiences. Senior students are placed with professionals who offer supervised work or research experience appropriate to their major interests. Participation requires the approval of both the department chair and field supervisor. Students must work 135 clock hours and maintain a daily log of their experiences. Field supervisor will plan student's work and evaluate performance.

CRAF   494. Fieldwork. 6 Hours.

Semester course; 270 clock hours. 6 credits. Prerequisites: senior standing in the major and permission of department chair. Opportunity for practical work experiences. Senior students are placed with professionals who offer supervised work or research experience appropriate to their major interests. Participation requires the approval of both the department chair and field supervisor. Students must work 270 clock hours and maintain a daily log of their experiences. Field supervisor will plan student's work and evaluate performance.