The purpose of the B.S.Ed. in Special Education and Teaching degree is to prepare students to serve as initially licensed special education teachers in K-12 schools, as well as to serve as educators and leaders in schools and community-based settings. The program will focus on providing students with the tools they need to make a difference in the lives of children, youth and adults with disabilities. Students will garner the knowledge and skills to become licensed special education teachers who work with children with high incidence disabilities, including individuals with learning disabilities, emotional disturbance and mild to moderate intellectual disability. Students will be able to recognize a child’s educational and social problems, to formulate effective and personalized/individualized instruction, and to consult with parents, teachers and administrators to incorporate accommodations and transitions across the child’s educational program. Students also will be prepared to teach reading and language, mathematics, and other core content areas, as well as be able to apply classroom and behavior management and social skills to students with diverse abilities and backgrounds. Graduates will be prepared to work in public and private elementary, middle and high schools across Virginia, with particular focus in urban and high-need areas. Graduates will be capable of working with diverse learners and adapting instructional programs based on the needs of their students and clients. Successful completion of the program will result in licensure in special education/general education curriculum (K-12).

See Admission to undergraduate programs for admission requirements to this program.

Learning outcomes

  • Students will be able to investigate and design inclusive learning environments, lesson and unit plans, and other activities that encourage learning and collaboration with students, families and other professionals when providing students with disabilities access to the general curriculum with the unique focus of urban and high needs schools.
  • Students will be able to explain and formulate a professional identity based on interpretation of foundations of special education law, characteristics and etiology of students with disabilities, and professional competencies grounded in research, practice and policy.
  • Students will be able to construct assessments, evaluation of plans and activities for group and individual needs of students with disabilities across environments.
  • Students will be able to develop transition plans and learning materials to draw connections between children, youth and adult outcomes to encourage full participation of students across the lifespan and environments.
  • Students will be able to effectively plan instructional strategies, including content-specific knowledge, to support the needs of individuals with disabilities. 

Relative to licensure requirements:

  • Students will be able to describe and demonstrate an understanding of the characteristics, development and individual learning differences of learners with high incidence disabilities.
  • Students will be able to explain and operate in learning environments, including community based-settings, where students with disabilities have access to the general curriculum, and will be able to critique environments that provide learning opportunities for students with high incidence disabilities.
  • Students will identify and construct a series of lesson plans and activities utilizing curriculum content knowledge and specialized materials, curriculum and resources that will include students with disabilities.
  • Students will be able to examine and design assessments across multiple environments and individual and group needs of students.
  • Students will be able to define and formulate professional learning dispositions and ethical practice relevant to serving people with disabilities.
  • Students will be able to plan and deliver instruction and management plans that include collaborative forms of communication from team members to plan for behavior, teaching, transition, social/emotional supports and other guides to address the needs of students with disabilities.

Degree requirements for Special Education and Teaching, Bachelor of Science in Education (B.S.Ed.)

Course Title Hours
University Core Education Curriculum
UNIV 111 Play VideoPlay course video for Focused Inquiry IFocused Inquiry I3
UNIV 112 Play VideoPlay course video for Focused Inquiry IIFocused Inquiry II3
UNIV 200Inquiry and the Craft of Argument3
Approved humanities/fine arts3
Approved natural/physical sciences3-4
Approved quantitative literacy3-4
Approved social/behavioral science3-4
Additional general education requirements
EDUS 301Human Development and Learning3
SEDP 330Survey of Special Education3
Approved general education elective 13
Core courses
EDUS 202Diversity, Democracy and Ethics4
SEDP 200Characteristics of Individuals With Disabilities3
SEDP 201Teaching Individuals With Mild and Moderate Disabilities3
SEDP 203Special Education Law3
SEDP 204Trends in Special Education3
SEDP 216Families and Professional Partnerships3
SEDP 282Multicultural Perspectives in Education3
SEDP 311Secondary Education and Transition Planning3
SEDP/EDUS 401Assessment in Diverse Settings3
SEDP 405Collaborative Practices and Co-teaching in Inclusive Schools3
TEDU/SEDP 410Building a Community of Learners: Classroom Management3
Concentration requirements
CLED 405A Survey of Career Counseling3
SEDP 315Classroom Management and Behavior Support for Students With Disabilities3
SEDP 320Development and Implementation of Positive Behavior Support Plans3
SEDP 378Teaching Math to Students With Disabilities3
SEDP 379Assessment Practices in Autism and Developmental Disabilities3
SEDP 380Teaching Reading to Students With Disabilities3
SEDP 389IEP and Due Process in Special Education3
SEDP 402Exceptionality and Technology: Augmentative and Alternative Communication and Assistive Technology3
SEDP 404Methods in Teaching Science and Social Studies for Students With Disabilities3
SEDP 415Action Research in Education and Special Education: Capstone Project3
SEDP 420Special Education Leadership for Inclusive Schools3
SEDP 460Specialized Reading and Writing Interventions for Students With Disabilities3
SEDP 461Specialized Math Interventions for Students With High Incidence Disabilities3
SEDP 495Universal Design for Learning and Transition3
TEDU 510Instructional Technology in PK-12 Environments2
Field-based learning and student teaching requirements
SEDP 250Special Education Elementary Supervision3
SEDP 350Special Education Middle School Supervision3
SEDP 450Special Education High School Supervision3
SEDP 499Student Teaching6
Total Hours123-126
1

Select three credits from AFAM, AMST, ANTH, ANTZ, ARBC, BIOL, BIOZ, CHEM, CHEZ, CHIN, ENGL, FLET, FREN, FRLG, FRSC, FRSZ, GRMN, GSWS, HEMS, HIST, HPEX, HPEZ, HUMS, HUSI, INSC, INTL, ITAL, LATN, LGCC, LING, MASC, MATH, MILS, NANO, OPER, PHIL, PHYS, PHYZ, POLI, PSYC, RELS, RUSS, SCTS, SETI, SOCS, SOCY, SPAN, SSOR, STAT or WRLD.

The minimum total of credit hours required for this degree is 123.

Freshman year
Fall semesterHours
SEDP 200 Characteristics of Individuals With Disabilities 3
UNIV 111 Play VideoPlay course video for Focused Inquiry I Focused Inquiry I 3
Approved humanities/fine arts 3
Approved quantitative literacy 3
Approved social/behavioral sciences 3
 Term Hours: 15
Spring semester
EDUS 202 Diversity, Democracy and Ethics 4
SEDP 201 Teaching Individuals With Mild and Moderate Disabilities 3
SEDP 204 Trends in Special Education 3
UNIV 112 Play VideoPlay course video for Focused Inquiry II Focused Inquiry II 3
Approved natural/physical sciences 3
 Term Hours: 16
Sophomore year
Fall semester
CLED 405 A Survey of Career Counseling 3
SEDP 203 Special Education Law 3
SEDP 282 Multicultural Perspectives in Education 3
SEDP 330 Survey of Special Education 3
TEDU/SEDP 410 Building a Community of Learners: Classroom Management 3
UNIV 200 Inquiry and the Craft of Argument (satisfies research and academic writing) 3
 Term Hours: 18
Spring semester
EDUS 301 Human Development and Learning 3
SEDP 216 Families and Professional Partnerships 3
SEDP 250 Special Education Elementary Supervision 3
SEDP 315 Classroom Management and Behavior Support for Students With Disabilities 3
SEDP 378 Teaching Math to Students With Disabilities 3
Approved general education elective 3
 Term Hours: 18
Junior year
Fall semester
SEDP 320 Development and Implementation of Positive Behavior Support Plans 3
SEDP 350 Special Education Middle School Supervision 3
SEDP/EDUS 401 Assessment in Diverse Settings 3
SEDP 405 Collaborative Practices and Co-teaching in Inclusive Schools 3
SEDP 461 Specialized Math Interventions for Students With High Incidence Disabilities 3
 Term Hours: 15
Spring semester
SEDP 311 Secondary Education and Transition Planning 3
SEDP 379 Assessment Practices in Autism and Developmental Disabilities 3
SEDP 380 Teaching Reading to Students With Disabilities 3
SEDP 389 IEP and Due Process in Special Education 3
SEDP 450 Special Education High School Supervision 3
 Term Hours: 15
Senior year
Fall semester
SEDP 402 Exceptionality and Technology: Augmentative and Alternative Communication and Assistive Technology 3
SEDP 404 Methods in Teaching Science and Social Studies for Students With Disabilities 3
SEDP 460 Specialized Reading and Writing Interventions for Students With Disabilities 3
SEDP 495 Universal Design for Learning and Transition 3
TEDU 510 Instructional Technology in PK-12 Environments 2
 Term Hours: 14
Spring semester
SEDP 415 Action Research in Education and Special Education: Capstone Project 3
SEDP 420 Special Education Leadership for Inclusive Schools 3
SEDP 499 Student Teaching (need to confirm course credits) 6
 Term Hours: 12
 Total Hours: 123

The minimum total of credit hours required for this degree is 123.

SEDP 200. Characteristics of Individuals With Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course focuses on characteristics and identification of individuals with learning disabilities, emotional and behavioral disorders, intellectual disabilities, developmental delay, the less severe autism spectrum disorders, traumatic brain injury, deaf-blindness, visual impairment and other health impairments, and knowledge of characteristics throughout the lifespan, as well as providing information on effects of educational, psychosocial and behavioral interventions that serve as adaptations to the general curriculum. The possibilities of co-morbid or multiple conditions, coupled with cross-categorical instructional settings, warrant a class that examines all eligibility categories of students served under the special education, general curriculum.

SEDP 201. Teaching Individuals With Mild and Moderate Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course provides an understanding and application of learning principles and methodologies for instructing, communicating and enhancing student learning that will reflect culturally responsive curriculum and pedagogy. An introduction to instructional strategies and organization of activities, including curriculum, media, materials and physical environment for children in grades K-12; studies of students with high-incidence disabilities in inclusive classroom environments are included. Candidates will develop skills to plan and deliver instruction in a variety of educational settings such as inclusive classrooms, resource rooms, self-contained classes and residential programs.

SEDP 203. Special Education Law. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course provides an overview of historical and current federal and state litigation and legislation, including those pertaining to special education and related services. Throughout this course, students will have various opportunities to learn federal and state statutes that address the educational rights of children/students with disabilities and their parents. Students will gain a deep understanding of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act. Specifically, students will become familiar with federal statutes and regulations concerning assessment and evaluation procedures, due process and mediation, discipline, individualized education program, free appropriate public education, and least restrictive environment. Additional federal laws that are discussed include the Rehabilitation Act of 1973: Section 504 and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Students are also expected to read and discuss selected issues in Virginia special education law and selected passages from the state statutes and the relevant administrative and case laws.

SEDP 204. Trends in Special Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course provides an understanding of the historical, philosophical and sociological foundations of public education in the United States, as well as standards for Virginia education and teaching professionals and ethical and accepted professional standards. The course will cover general knowledge of the foundations of educating students with disabilities, including a general overview of legislation and case law pertaining to special education; characteristics of individuals with and without exceptionalities, including growth and development from birth through adolescence; medical aspects of disabilities; family systems and culture; collaboration; integration/inclusion; transition; and classroom adaptations for educating students with disabilities in the least restrictive environments.

SEDP 216. Families and Professional Partnerships. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed to increase the knowledge, skills and dispositions that are important for collaborating and communicating effectively with families of young children with special needs. This course will also emphasize understanding the role and responsibilities of community agencies and providers, and how understanding the role of members of the collaborative team can impact families in the education and transition of their children with disabilities to include education, training, employment, self-determination and other skills. During this course, students will explore the dimensions of family-centered services and person-centered planning, as well as the familial, ecological and cultural factors affecting young children with disabilities and their caregivers. Students will learn about theory, general principles and procedures for fostering collaborative partnerships among families, professionals and other stakeholders that lead to outcomes of individual and mutual empowerment.

SEDP 250. Special Education Elementary Supervision. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 1 field experience hours. 3 credits. Enrollment is restricted to students with a minimum of 30 hours (sophomore, junior or senior standing). The purpose of this field experience is to provide teacher candidates with practical experiences within the classroom. The teacher candidate will be observed and evaluated based on demonstration of their knowledge and ability to meet performance standards measured by the Virginia Standards of Learning in any of the following areas: curriculum and instruction, assessment, classroom and behavior management, collaboration, professional and ethical behavior, characteristics, IEP development and implementation, instruction for reading, writing and mathematics, and transition.

SEDP 282. Multicultural Perspectives in Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed to enhance cultural competence in diverse classrooms and schools. Major considerations include race, ethnicity, socio-economic status, linguistic abilities, and gender and sexual orientation differences. Key concepts include structural, curricular and instructional facets of working successfully in diverse educational settings. Personal and theoretical constructs of race, ethnicity, culture, disability and other related concepts are explored. Through lectures, readings, group projects, class activities, videos and class discussions students will explore the impact of institutional "isms" on both Anglo students and students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

SEDP 311. Secondary Education and Transition Planning. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course explores the literature, research, issues and trends that are relevant to children and youth with high-incidence disabilities (learning disabilities, emotional disabilities and/or mild intellectual disabilities) as they prepare for their transition to life after high school. Focus is on providing candidates with the ability to prepare their students and work with their families to promote successful transitions throughout the educational experience, including post-secondary training, employment and independent living, which address an understanding of long-term planning, transition assessments, career development, life skills, community experiences and resources, self-advocacy and self-determination, guardianship, and legal considerations. The full range of functioning is addressed in the areas of education, employment, social/emotional functioning and development, and personal and daily living issues. The overriding goal of this course is to provide candidates with the wherewithal for critical reflection in their professional practice to help individuals with disabilities develop, implement and achieve self-determined transition goals for their post-school years.

SEDP 315. Classroom Management and Behavior Support for Students With Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course will provide an in-depth analysis of theoretical models, research and strategies for supporting positive behavior of students with disabilities. Emphasis is on developing, implementing and evaluating behavior management programs in special education, including applied behavior analysis, functional assessment, positive behavioral supports and related classroom strategies. This course will help develop a candidate’s ideas about examining the behaviors of students with special needs in school settings, including an understanding and application of school crisis management and safety plans, classroom and behavior management techniques, and individualized behavioral interventions. Techniques and approaches taught will promote skills that are consistent with norms, standards and rules of the educational environment and will be culturally diverse and responsive based upon developmental (e.g., students’ ages and classroom management), cognitive, behavioral, social and ecological theory and practice. Students will learn to evaluate students’ behavior and environments, as well as reflect on their own role in contributing to mitigating behavior problems. Candidates will also learn strategies to prevent and/or intervene in those factors to students’ problematic behavior and facilitate their positive behavior.

SEDP 320. Development and Implementation of Positive Behavior Support Plans. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed to provide pre-service teachers with the opportunity to acquire advanced skills for effective planning, implementing and evaluating behavior strategies and supports. It will also present strategies available for management, communication and discipline at the introductory level. Students will examine a cross section of theories, models and legal and ethical variables relevant to orchestrating learning across school settings where individuals with disabilities are receiving instructional, social, behavioral and transition life-skill services. The use of positive behavioral interventions and functional behavior analysis will be discussed and students will demonstrate appropriate skills using these strategies. Students will also learn the process used to develop and monitor behavior support plans.

SEDP 330. Survey of Special Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Presents an overview of the historical basis and regulatory requirements related to special education, including the individual education program as a legal document and the rights and responsibilities of parents, teachers and schools. The characteristics of learners with disabilities and their educational and medical implications are also examined, as well as the cultural, familial and ethical issues involved.

SEDP 350. Special Education Middle School Supervision. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 1 field experience hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SEDP 250. Enrollment is restricted to students with a minimum of 60 hours (junior or senior standing). The purpose of this field experience is to provide teacher candidates with practical experiences within the classroom. The teacher candidate will be observed and evaluated based on demonstration of their knowledge and ability to meet performance standards measured by the Virginia Standards of Learning in any of the following areas: curriculum and instruction, assessment, classroom and behavior management, collaboration, professional and ethical behavior, characteristics, IEP development and implementation, instruction for reading, writing and mathematics, and transition.

SEDP 378. Teaching Math to Students With Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed for prospective teachers in the special education program and addresses mathematics pedagogy for students with disabilities. The course will focus on selecting appropriate mathematics curricula and instructional methodologies; learning how to assess students and develop appropriate goals, including Virginia Standards of Learning across grades K-12; understanding of application of mathematics service delivery, curriculum and instruction of students with disabilities, including alternate ways to teach and adapt math content to students accessing the general curriculum across K-12 environments; and planning and integrating appropriate and evidence‐based math strategies into students’ programming based on assessment data.

SEDP 379. Assessment Practices in Autism and Developmental Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course creates a structure for understanding and designing effective social interactions and communication strategies, social-emotional development, and behavior interventions for children with autism spectrum disorder and other developmental disabilities. The course focuses on the application of empirically validated social interaction/communication and behavioral interventions that are consistent with principles of ABA in designing the interventions.

SEDP 380. Teaching Reading to Students With Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course provides empirically validated instructional procedures to address reading for students with disabilities. The focus will be on understanding state and national reading curriculum, pedagogy and assessments of students’ reading skills; planning and implementing appropriate instructional procedures; and monitoring students’ progress. Development of age-appropriate language acquisition, reading and writing is included. Curriculum development that includes scope and sequence, lesson plans, instructional methods based on access to the general curriculum and Virginia standards, including alternate ways to teach reading and writing content, is applied.

SEDP 389. IEP and Due Process in Special Education. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is designed to provide educational personnel with knowledge of the eligibility process and legal regulatory requirements for IEP development. Participants will apply knowledge of content standards, assessment and evaluations throughout the K-12 grades to construct IEPs; make decisions about student progress, instruction, program, accommodations, placement, teaching methods and transition; and complete hands-on IEP writing experiences that will address academic and functional needs of students with disabilities. Participants will engage in debate regarding due process and other regulatory requirements and measures, including the least restrictive setting for students with special needs, timelines and team member responsibilities.

SEDP 401. Assessment in Diverse Settings. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment is restricted to students admitted to a B.S. in Education program. This course explores all aspects of assessment that a teacher encounters in preK-12 educational settings. The course will cover current assessment theories, approaches and instruments used to measure the performance of the children and students representing the diverse learners in today’s classrooms -- including students with and without disabilities, English language learners and students representing a range of cultural backgrounds. Assessments at all stages of instruction (before, during and after), including formal and informal assessments and their applications in an inclusive educational setting, will be addressed. Particular attention is paid to the ways in which teachers can gather and use assessments to make data-informed decisions for effective instruction and intervention leading to optimal child development and student achievement. Specifically, the course will explore the relationships among content standards, instruction and assessment as well as ways to use a variety of assessments to monitor student progress. The course emphasizes making valid inferences from assessments in a variety of formats; understanding the legal and policy context of assessment; and the implications for appropriate grading practices and decision-making. Course content and assignments will promote critical-thinking and problem-solving skills. Crosslisted as: EDUS 401.

SEDP 402. Exceptionality and Technology: Augmentative and Alternative Communication and Assistive Technology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course will provide students with foundational ideas and concepts regarding the selection and use of assistive technology and augmentative and alternative communication for students with disabilities. Students will recognize and plan for the uses of technology that will aid the student in their education, work and independent living. This course emphasizes the selection and use of AT and AAC in general and special education settings (K-12) for students across the continuum of disability.

SEDP 404. Methods in Teaching Science and Social Studies for Students With Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment is restricted to juniors or seniors with a minimum of 60 credits. This course combines a process approach of science programs drawn from biological, earth and physical sciences with the study of social studies curriculum, materials and selected instructional strategies for teaching students with disabilities. An understanding of vocabulary development and comprehension skills in science and history will cultivate strategies for students to ask effective questions, summarize and retell both verbally and in writing strategies to impart an understanding of science and history standards of learning. The first half of this course will be dedicated to encouraging effective science instruction for diverse students, with the second half dedicated to encouraging effective social studies/science instruction.

SEDP 405. Collaborative Practices and Co-teaching in Inclusive Schools. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment is restricted to juniors or seniors with a minimum of 60 credits. This course is designed to help prospective general and special educators develop an understanding of collaborative and communication strategies, models and techniques to meet the educational needs of children with disabilities. Skills in consultation, case management and collaboration, including coordination of service delivery with related services providers, general educators, administrators, parents, students and other professions (e.g., paraprofessionals, community agencies) in collaborative work environments will be understood. Class activities, discussions and projects will concentrate on appropriately meeting the needs of children with disabilities within the context of the general education setting. Students will also study and practice a variety of instructional and organizational techniques for adapting the general classroom environments in order to address the needs of children with disabilities in the general education classroom.

SEDP 410. Building a Community of Learners: Classroom Management. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The course is designed to encompass pre-K through grade 12 classroom management theory and application, motivation theory and application, diversity, socio-emotional development, trauma-informed care, and restorative justice for regular education and special education students. Crosslisted as: TEDU 410.

SEDP 415. Action Research in Education and Special Education: Capstone Project. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment is restricted to seniors with a minimum of 90 credits. This course will prepare students to be reflective practitioners by connecting theory, research and practice through the exploration of action research. The course will consist of three components that promote students’ capacity for putting research into action related to their direct work with children and youth with disabilities and their families. Students will first be guided to investigate a research-based instruction/intervention strategy or approach to teaching children and youth with disabilities or developmental delays through a structured literature review. Students will then develop a research plan to be implemented during one of their externships based on the results of the literature review. Finally, students will present their literature review summary and research plan via an online and/or face-to-face poster presentation format. Ongoing, interactive reflections from students are essential components throughout the course.

SEDP 420. Special Education Leadership for Inclusive Schools. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Enrollment is restricted to students with a minimum of 90 credits (senior standing). This course will introduce participants to issues involved in leadership for creating inclusive environments in schools. These systems are aimed to fully include students with disabilities and ensure positive outcomes for students both academically and in functional skills needed for participation in the education environment, community, employment and for post-secondary success. Students will be challenged with assessing their own leadership styles, professional and ethical standards, personal integrity, and how beliefs and values shape actions. Students will also explore strategies to promote the importance of inclusive education as well examine Virginia standards and CEC standards for inclusive schools. Students will have a chance to see the impact of teacher leadership on special education and understand how to promote self-advocacy in students.

SEDP 450. Special Education High School Supervision. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 2 lecture and 1 field experience hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SEDP 350. Enrollment is restricted to students with a minimum of 60 hours (junior or senior standing). The purpose of this field experience is to provide teacher candidates with practical experiences within the classroom. The teacher candidate will be observed and evaluated based on demonstration of their knowledge and ability to meet performance standards measured by the Virginia Standards of Learning in any of the following areas: curriculum and instruction, assessment, classroom and behavior management, collaboration, professional and ethical behavior, characteristics, IEP development and implementation, instruction for reading, writing and mathematics, and transition.

SEDP 460. Specialized Reading and Writing Interventions for Students With Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SEDP 380. This course will cover the complex nature of language and literacy to include assessment strategies and instructional procedures, curriculum and instruction alternatives, and program planning for the literacy development of students with reading and/or writing disabilities. Skills in the area of phonemic awareness, sound and symbol relationships, explicit phonics instruction, syllables, phonemes, morphemes, decoding skills, word attack skills, syntax and semantics will be developed. Students will learn teaching skills, remediating deficits, utilizing research/evidence-based interventions, providing explicit reading and writing instruction, implementing and evaluating individual and group management techniques and individual interventions that teach and maintain emotional, behavioral and social skills across ages and developmental levels. The course will focus on how, as a teacher, one participates in tiered support systems and facilitates/provides appropriately focused and intensive literacy instruction.

SEDP 461. Specialized Math Interventions for Students With High Incidence Disabilities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SEDP 378. This course focuses on interventions for students with high incidence disabilities who may need additional instruction beyond their core mathematics class. The course is designed to increase student understanding and achievement by increasing time and intensity on grade-level standards. Strategies used in the intervention course should be different than strategies used in the core math course and are inclusive of all student populations, including general education, special education or English language learners. When done appropriately, this course will both build student confidence and reduce the likelihood of them repeating their core mathematics course. In addition, students will explore research and evidence-based interventions. The class will be designed around the seven principles of effective intervention for students with mathematics disabilities.

SEDP 492. Independent Study. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 lecture hours. 1-3 credits. Opportunities are provided for supervised independent study in selected areas. All work offered on an individual basis with the approval of instructor and department chair.

SEDP 495. Universal Design for Learning and Transition. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The purpose of this course is to provide students with evidence of each of the components of universal design for learning within access to the general academic curriculum -- multiple means of representation, expression and engagement. Students will engage in an understanding of theories of learning and development, including cognitive and learning processes, social-emotional development, practices for culturally and linguistically diverse learnings, such as English learners, gifted and talented students and students with disabilities, in individual and universal contexts. Additional focus is placed on UDL components linked to effective transition planning embedded within academic instruction targeting successful transitions to postsecondary educational settings. Emphasis is placed on beginning research on the use of this approach and its promising practice for addressing academic and transition goals as well as increasing student motivation and self-determination.

SEDP 499. Student Teaching. 6 Hours.

Semester course; 6 field experience hours. 6 credits. The major goal of this course is to provide student teachers a challenging, relevant and rewarding experience, which will allow them to acquire professional competence. Student teachers will learn to respect and work effectively with students of varying backgrounds and disabilities; assume the various responsibilities of the classroom teacher; plan instruction and learning experiences that recognize the individual needs and differences of students; organize and manage the classroom environment to maximize learning; and practice being a reflective teacher.