ECON   101. Introduction to Political Economy. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Seminar on the development of critical thought and economic analysis of policy issues. Focus is on how policy choices affect society and the individual, the economic methodology that guides policy choices, and the institutional and political environments within which policy is derived. Issues cover a broad range of topics including environmental issues, tax policy, inflation expectations, unemployment, foreign trade and the effectiveness of fiscal and monetary policies. Crosslisted as: INTL   102.

ECON   203. Introduction to Economics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A survey of economic principles, institutions and problems. The course is designed to provide basic economic understanding for students who do not expect to major in economics or in the School of Business. Not applicable for credit toward economics and business majors. Also note that students may receive credit for only two of the following three courses: ECON   203, 210 or 211.

ECON   205. The Economics of Product Development and Markets. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An introduction to some of the fundamental economic concepts necessary to effectively operate in today's marketplace. Basic elements of microeconomics, net present value analysis and market strategy will be covered in class. The goal is to provide students with a better understanding of how to approach business problems and of proven problem-solving techniques. Appropriate for engineering and non-engineering students.

ECON   210. Principles of Microeconomics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A course designed to acquaint the student with a theoretical and practical understanding of the economic institutions and problems of the American economy with a focus on microeconomics. Note that students may receive credit toward their degree requirements for only two of the following three courses: ECON   203, 210 and 211.

ECON   211. Principles of Macroeconomics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON   203 with minimum grade of a B or ECON   210. A course designed to acquaint the student with a theoretical and practical understanding of the economic institutions and problems of the American economy with a focus on macroeconomics. Note that students may receive credit toward their degree requirements for only two of the following three courses: ECON   203, 210 and 211.

ECON   291. Topics in Economics. 1-3 Hours.

Variable hours. Variable credit. Maximum of 3 credits per topic. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. An in-depth study of selected business topics. Graded as pass/fail at the option of the department.

ECON   300. Contemporary Economic Issues. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON 203 with a minimum grade of B or ECON 210; ECON 211; and junior standing. Students will learn to think critically about current policy issues using basic economic principles. Communication skills will be developed through presenting, discussing and debating alternative positions in class. Students will work in teams to outline the basic economic incentives and the direct and indirect costs and benefits associated with different policy actions. Through teamwork students will practice leadership skills and methods to manage group dynamics. Topics will vary by semester and may include the economics of discrimination, the environment, health care, cultural arts, education, business ethics, fiscal policy, monetary policy, globalization, inequality and immigration.

ECON   301. Microeconomic Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON   203 with a minimum grade of B or ECON   210; and SCMA   212 or MATH   200. Analysis of the principles that govern production, exchange and consumption of goods and services. Topics include demand analysis, production and cost theory, price and output determination, theory of markets and distribution theory.

ECON   302. Macroeconomic Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON   203 with a minimum grade of B grade or ECON   210; ECON   211; and SCMA   212 or MATH   200. A general survey of national income analysis and macroeconomic theory. Detailed study of public policies affecting price levels, employment, economic growth and the balance of payments.

ECON   303. Managerial Economics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON   203 with a minimum grade of B and ECON   211; or ECON   210 and ECON   211; and SCMA   212 or MATH   200. This course is restricted to students who have completed at least 54 credit hours (junior standing). Application of tools of economic analysis to allocation problems in profit and nonprofit organizations. Models for evaluating revenue, production, cost and pricing will be presented. Emphasis on developing decision rules for turning data into information for solving problems.

ECON   305. Public Finance - State and Local. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON   203 with a minimum grade of B or ECON   210. An economic analysis of state and local government budgeting, revenue sources and expenditures.

ECON   307. Money and Banking. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON   211. A study of money, financial markets and the financial structure with emphasis on commercial banks and the Federal Reserve System. Relationships between economic activity and money supply are introduced.

ECON   312. E-commerce and Markets for Information Goods. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON   203 with a minimum grade of B or ECON   210. This course surveys the ways that information and emerging information technologies affect market organization and market efficiency. Competitive strategies and regulatory policy for information markets also are considered. Topics include network effects, first mover advantages, auctions, price discrimination and organizational structure.

ECON   313. Economics of Transportation. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON   203 with a minimum grade of B or ECON   210. An economic analysis of the transportation industry with special emphasis on regulation, public policy and urban transportation.

ECON   315. Economic Development. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON   203 with a minimum grade of B and ECON   211; or ECON   210 and ECON   211. Introduction to the process of economic development. Surveys development theory and experiences of underdeveloped countries of Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean and of developed countries. Explores obstacles to development and policies and tools for stimulating economic development. Crosslisted as: AFAM   315/INTL   315.

ECON   321. Urban Economics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON   203 with a minimum grade of B or ECON   210. An introduction to urban economics, with an emphasis on the economics of agglomeration and the role of externalities in the urban economy. Economic analysis of the provision of urban public services and urban public financing, especially in politically fragmented areas. Crosslisted as: URSP   321.

ECON   325. Environmental Economics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course is restricted to students who have completed at least 54 credit hours (junior standing). The application of economic analysis to externalities such as air and water pollution, pesticide control, land use planning and other environmental issues. The role of cost/benefit analysis in the decision-making process is developed. Efficiency and equity issues are evaluated.

ECON   329. International Economics. 3 Hours.

3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON   203 with a minimum grade of B and ECON   211; or ECON   210 and ECON   211. An analysis of economic and political influences on exports and imports, balance of payments, foreign investment, exchange rates and international monetary systems. Crosslisted as: INTL   329.

ECON   333. Behavioral Economics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON   203 with a minimum grade of B or ECON   210. Identifies when behavior systematically violates mainstream models and provides alternative behavioral models which are psychologically and empirically plausible. Discusses a variety of violations including endowment effects, framing, dynamic inconsistency and the winner's curse.

ECON   338. Game Theory. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON   203 with a minimum grade of B or ECON   210. Analyzes strategic situations using game theory. Applies the analysis to a variety of settings and questions. Develops an understanding of the uses and limitations of the analysis.

ECON   344. Biodiversity and Ecological Economics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON   203 with a minimum grade of B or ECON   210. Explores the use of both economic and ecological approaches to the identification, valuation and protection of biological diversity and ecological integrity. Investigates the potential of coupled human and natural systems through construction and computer simulation of dynamic ecological-economic models.

ECON   402. Business Cycles and Forecasting. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON   203 with a minimum grade of B and ECON   211; or ECON   210 and ECON   211. An examination of repetitive variations in business activity. The measurement and analysis of economic fluctuations and how they affect the business environment. Stresses modern forecasting techniques.

ECON   403. Introduction to Mathematical Economics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON   203 with a minimum grade of B and ECON   211; or ECON   210 and ECON   211. This course is restricted to students who have completed at least 54 credit hours (junior standing). The application of mathematical techniques to economic theory and economic models.

ECON   419. History of Economic Thought. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON   203 with a minimum grade of B and ECON   211; or ECON   210 and ECON   211. A survey of the ideas of major economic contributors to modern economic thought. Theories of value, growth and distribution from the 18th through the 20th centuries will be presented.

ECON   421. Government and Business. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ECON   203 with a minimum grade of B or ECON   210. The application of economic analysis to the behavior of business, industry and government regulation. Topics include the causes and exercise of monopoly power, antitrust enforcement, public utilities and industry studies.

ECON   431. Labor Economics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON   300, 301 and 302; and STAT   210, STAT   212, MGMT 301 or PSYC   214. This course is restricted to students who have completed at least 54 credit hours (junior standing). Analysis of labor markets and institutions to gain an understanding of the process of wage and employment determination. Both historic and current topics are included.

ECON   441. Experimental Economics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON   300, ECON   301 and 302; and STAT   210, STAT   212, MGMT 301 or PSYC   214; and junior standing. Students will learn about the leading models of decision making and human behavior in markets. The course will focus on using experimental methods to test the models’ hypotheses. Students will learn how to design experiments, collect experimental data, and how to examine the data and interpret the results.

ECON   442. Economic Growth. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON   203 with a minimum grade of B and ECON   211; or ECON   210 and ECON   211. Explores determinants of cross-country income differences using economic models, economic history and data analysis. Analyzes factors that influence productivity growth and diffusion of technology between countries.

ECON   489. Senior Seminar in Economics. 3 Hours.

3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON   300, ECON   301 and 302; STAT   210, STAT   212, MGMT 301 or PSYC   214; and junior standing. Analysis of economic theory and problems. Students will study a few topics in depth, focusing on understanding the current research, critically analyzing controversial issues and using data to investigate competing claims.

ECON   491. Topics in Economics. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. Variable credit. Maximum of 3 credits per topics course; maximum total of 6 credits for all topics courses. Prerequisite: junior standing. An in-depth study of a selected economic topic, to be announced in advance.

ECON   492. Independent Study in Economics. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1-3 credits. Maximum total of 3 credits. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing as an economics major and approval of adviser and department chair prior to course registration. Intensive study under supervision of a faculty member in an area not covered in depth or contained in the regular curriculum.

ECON   493. Internship in Economics. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; the student is expected to work at the site 15-20 hours per week. 1-3 credits. Prerequisites: junior standing, a minimum of 3.0 GPA in economics courses, at least 15 economics credits and permission of the department chair. Intention to enroll must be indicated to the instructor prior to or during registration for semester of credit. The internship is designed to give students practical experience in an appropriate supervised environment in the public or private sector. Graded as pass/fail.