811 and 813 South Cathedral Place
P.O. Box 842001
Richmond, Virginia 23284
Phone: (804) 828-1635
Fax: (804) 828-7085

history.vcu.edu

John T. Kneebone, Ph.D.
Associate professor and chair

Peter Stone
Assistant professor, assistant to the chair and faculty adviser for undergraduate studies

Sarah Meacham, Ph.D.
Associate professor and director of graduate studies

Kathleen Murphy
Administrative coordinator

The Department of History offers programs at the graduate and undergraduate levels, specializing in a multidimensional analysis of the human past. Faculty research interests vary among thematic, topical, national or chronological emphases. For more information regarding the department and its specialty areas, visit the website at history.vcu.edu.

HIST   101. Survey of European History. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 3 lecture hours. 3, 3 credits. A survey of European civilization from the ancient world to the present, emphasizing the events, ideas and institutions that have shaped, influenced and defined Europe's place in the world. First semester: to 16th century. Second semester: 16th century to the present.

HIST   102. Survey of European History. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 3 lecture hours. 3, 3 credits. A survey of European civilization from the ancient world to the present, emphasizing the events, ideas and institutions that have shaped, influenced and defined Europe's place in the world. First semester: to 16th century. Second semester: 16th century to the present.

HIST   103. Survey of American History. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 3 lecture hours. 3, 3 credits. A survey of American civilization from prehistory to the present, emphasizing the events, ideas and institutions that have shaped, influenced and defined America's place in the world. First semester: to Reconstruction. Second semester: Reconstruction to present.

HIST   104. Survey of American History. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 3 lecture hours. 3, 3 credits. A survey of American civilization from prehistory to the present, emphasizing the events, ideas and institutions that have shaped, influenced and defined America's place in the world. First semester: to Reconstruction. Second semester: Reconstruction to present.

HIST   105. Survey of African History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A survey of African civilizations from prehistory to the present, emphasizing the events, ideas and institutions that have shaped, influenced and defined Africa's place in the world. First semester: to 1800. Second semester: 1800 to the present. Crosslisted as: AFAM   105.

HIST   106. Survey of African History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A survey of African civilizations from prehistory to the present, emphasizing the events, ideas and institutions that have shaped, influenced and defined Africa's place in the world. First semester: to 1800. Second semester: 1800 to the present. Crosslisted as: AFAM   106.

HIST   107. Survey of East Asian Civilizations. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 3 lecture hours. 3, 3 credits. A survey of East Asian civilizations (China and Japan) from prehistory to the present, emphasizing the events, ideas and institutions that shaped, influenced and defined East Asia's place in the world. First semester: to the 14th century. Second semester: from the 14th century to the present.

HIST   108. Survey of East Asian Civilizations. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 3 lecture hours. 3, 3 credits. A survey of East Asian civilizations (China and Japan) from prehistory to the present, emphasizing the events, ideas and institutions that shaped, influenced and defined East Asia's place in the world. First semester: to the 14th century. Second semester: from the 14th century to the present.

HIST   109. Survey of Latin American History. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 3 lecture hours. 3, 3 credits. A survey of Latin American civilization from its early civilizations to the present, emphasizing the events, ideas and institutions that have shaped, influenced and defined Latin America's place in the world. First semester: to 1824. Second semester: 1824 to the present.

HIST   110. Survey of Latin American History. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 3 lecture hours. 3, 3 credits. A survey of Latin American civilization from its early civilizations to the present, emphasizing the events, ideas and institutions that have shaped, influenced and defined Latin America's place in the world. First semester: to 1824. Second semester: 1824 to the present.

HIST   191. Topics in History. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 1-3 credits per semester. Maximum total of 6 credits. The study of a selected topic or topics in history. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

HIST   201. The Art of Historical Detection: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Introduces non-history majors to the methods of the discipline by undertaking a series of case studies in historical inquiry. Each case study will consist of a close examination of a single historical question, covering the general background to that question and exploring relevant primary and secondary sources. Students will then use this evidence to propose well-reasoned solutions to the question at hand.

HIST   300. Introduction to Historical Study. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. History majors must complete HIST   300 with at least a grade of C prior to enrolling in more than six credits of 300- or 400-level history courses. This introduction to the historical discipline is required of all history majors. It is designed to enhance basic research, writing and study skills in order to increase student appreciation of, and performance in, the advanced courses within the history major.

HIST   301. The Ancient Near East. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the ancient Near Eastern civilizations from the preliterary period to the end of Kassite rule in Babylonia (c. 1160 B.C.). Crosslisted as: RELS   315.

HIST   302. Ancient Egypt. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A general survey of the history and culture of ancient Egypt from the Predynastic Period through the age of the New Kingdom. In addition to the historical reconstruction, emphasis is placed on the art, literature and religion of each of the major periods.

HIST   303. Greek Civilization. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the unique cultural heritage of Greece and the historical patterns that rose from it, from the Heroic Age to the urban worlds after Alexander, 1400 B.C.-146 B.C.

HIST   304. Roman Civilization. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of Roman history as it derived from Roman cultural institutions, from the Etruscan period through the conflict of the pagan and Christian worlds and advent of the barbarians, 753 B.C.-A.D. 454.

HIST   307. The High Middle Ages. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A detailed historical analysis of the Gregorian Revolution, the Crusades, the 12th-century Renaissance, the Thomistic World and the death of medieval civilization. Crosslisted as: RELS   308.

HIST   310. The Early Middle Ages. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A topical, thematic, integrative and problems approach to the emergence of a distinctive European community during the period frequently alluded to as the "Dark Ages.

HIST   311. High and Later Middle Ages. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A detailed historical overview of developments in Western Europe from the end of the first millennium through the end of the 15th century. Crosslisted as: RELS   308.

HIST   312. Europe in the Early Modern Period, 1350-1650. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Describes the political, intellectual, religious and social developments in Europe from the Black Death through the wars of religion, including the Renaissance, the Reformation and the Voyages of Exploration.

HIST   313. Europe in Absolutism and Enlightenment, 1648-1815. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines the political, social and economic orders of Old Regime Europe in the context of their increasing contradictions; introduces the cultural and intellectual forces that helped challenge that regime; culminates in the French Revolution and Napoleon.

HIST   314. The Zenith of European Power, 1815-1914. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the period in which the nations of Europe reached their height of world power between the reconstruction of Europe after the Napoleonic Wars and the eve of World War I. Topics include the rise of nationalism, liberalism and socialism; the spread of capitalism and industrial society; the beginnings of mass politics; the new imperialism; the diplomatic revolution in the European state system before World War I.

HIST   315. The Age of Total War in Europe, 1914-1945. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the transformation of European society precipitated by World War I and World War II. Emphasis is placed on the origin, nature and repercussions of total war; the crisis of democracy and the rise of modern dictatorships; changes in political, economic and social institutions; and the decline of European power.

HIST   316. Postwar Europe, 1945 to the Present. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An examination of Europe's social, economic and political recovery after World War II and of the transformation of Europe from the center toward the periphery of world power.

HIST   317. History of France I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A history of France from Gallo-Roman times through the French Revolution and the Napoleonic era.

HIST   318. History of France II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A history of France from 1815 to the present.

HIST   319. History of Germany I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Covers major developments in Germany from the 30 Years War and rise of Prussia through the unification of the German nation-state in 1871.

HIST   320. History of Germany II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Covers major developments in Germany from 1871 through World War I, Weimar, Third Reich, World War II and reunification in 1990.

HIST   321. The Holocaust. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A multidisciplinary examination of the events leading to and culminating in the Nazi extermination of six million Jews; the historical settings of European Jewry and of German fascism; the role of traditional anti-Semitism; the psychology of aggressor and victim; the Holocaust in art and literature and the moral implications for today.

HIST   322. Nazi Germany. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The origin and nature of Hitler's Third Reich. A study of the failure of the Weimar Republic; genesis of the Nazi racial ideology and party structure; the Nazi political, social and cultural order after the seizure of power; Nazi foreign policy leading to war and genocide; and an analysis of the personality of Hitler.

HIST   324. History of Early Modern Britain. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Explores the development of British politics, society and culture from the Tudor Revolution in government and through the Reformation, English civil wars and Restoration.

HIST   325. History of Modern Britain. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Explores the development of British politics and society from the Restoration to the mid-20th century, including such topics as the Whig oligarchy, the Industrial Revolution, Victorianism, the impact of the world wars and the problems of Empire.

HIST   326. The British Empire. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines the origin, development and decline of British overseas expansion from the late 16th century through the mid-20th century, including colonial settlements in Ireland, North America, the Caribbean, Australia and South Africa; dependencies and protectorates in Africa and the Middle East; and the empire of India. Focuses on the political and legal structures that enabled the administration and subordination of such a large and fragmented area and assesses the extent to which empire shaped and complicated gender, class and racial relations both at home and throughout the British imperial world.

HIST   327. History of Russia I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Russian history to 1855, emphasizing the development of political and social institutions and Russia's unique position between Europe and Asia.

HIST   328. History of Russia II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Russian history from 1855 to the present, emphasizing the development of political and social institutions and Russia's unique position between Europe and Asia.

HIST   329. History of Spain and Portugal. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A survey of the history of the Iberian peninsula from ancient times to the present, with an emphasis on the distinctive culture and attitude toward life that developed south of the Pyrenees.

HIST   330. History of Women in Europe I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A survey of European women from antiquity to the Enlightenment. A major focus will be primary sources by and about women. Crosslisted as: GSWS   339.

HIST   331. History of Women in Europe II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A survey of European women from the French Revolution to the present. A major focus will be primary sources by and about women. Crosslisted as: GSWS   340.

HIST   332. History in Film. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits with different topics. An examination of the uses and misuses of historical events and personalities in film. Lectures and readings are used to critically analyze films dealing with biographies, events and propaganda.

HIST   333. History of the Jewish People I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the Jewish people from the biblical period to the early modern period, including the Israelite conquest of Canaan, Judea in Hellenistic and Roman times, the Diaspora in Islam and in Europe, social and cultural trends, and Jewish settlement in the Ottoman Empire. Crosslisted as: RELS   318.

HIST   334. History of the Jewish People II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the Jewish people from the early modern to the present, including the impact of the Emancipation, the rise of the American Jewish community, the impact of modernism and growth of Reform, the beginnings and growth of Zionism, restoration in Palestine, the Holocaust, the creation of Israel, and the relations of Israel and world Jewry. Crosslisted as: RELS   319.

HIST   335. History of Christianity I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A historical and theological examination of Christianity from its origin to the early modern period, or the age of the Reformations. Emphasis is placed upon an understanding of leading events, ideas, movements and persons in their historical settings. Crosslisted as: RELS   327.

HIST   336. History of Christianity II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A historical and theological examination of Christianity from ca. 1500 to the present. Emphasis is placed upon an understanding of leading events, ideas, movements and persons in their historical settings.

HIST   339. History of Women in Europe. 3 Hours.

Semester courses; 3 lecture hours. 3, 3 credits. A history of European women from the Greeks to the contemporary world. A major focus of both courses will be primary sources by and about women. Semester covers antiquity to the Enlightenment. Crosslisted as: GSWS   339.

HIST   340. The Middle East, 600-1600. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Explores two transformative historical events that took place in the Middle East between the sixth and 16th centuries: 1) the emergence of Islam and the development of the Islamic Empire and its social, cultural and political legacy in the Middle East (seventh to 10th centuries) and 2) the influx of outsiders to the region, such as the Turkish-speaking tribes, the crusaders and the Mongols, and the role these newcomers played in shaping the Middle East starting in the 10th century.

HIST   341. Modern Middle East. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Analysis of the history, problems and prospects of the nations and peoples of the Middle East with emphasis on developments since the Balfour Declaration of 1917.

HIST   342. Early Modern Ottoman Empire. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Explores the history of the Ottoman Empire from around mid-15th century until roughly the late-18th century. Examines the Ottoman Empire as a Euro-Mediterranean polity, exploring its social, cultural, economic and political history from a global perspective.

HIST   343. Modern Ottoman Empire. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Explores the transformations of the late-Ottoman state and society by organizing the material around several historical processes and frameworks, such as the phenomenon of the gunpowder empires, integration of the empire to the global market, the decline paradigm, impact of colonialism and imperialism, Tanzimat reforms, the shift from subjecthood to citizenship, modernity, transformation of religious identities, state and nation formation, nationalism, secularism, gender and war mobilization.

HIST   344. American Military History to 1900. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Investigates the emergence and evolution of the American military from 1600 to 1900, with a focus on nation building and nationalism, the relationship between the civil and military spheres, professionalization, the experiences of the armed forces, strategic and tactical evolution, and the relationships among war, technology and nature.

HIST   345. American Colonies, 1450-1776. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An examination of the development of the 13 original colonies; the establishment and growth of society, politics and the economy; and modification in the relationship between the provinces and Great Britain.

HIST   346. The American Revolutionary Era, 1763-1800. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An examination of the late-18th-century revolutions which molded the American political system -- the revolution of colonial Englishmen against Great Britain and the revolution of the nationalists against the government established by the American Revolution, which produced and firmly established the United States Constitution.

HIST   347. Antebellum America, 1800-1860. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Federalist era to 1860. A study of the events, forces and personalities that shaped Antebellum America and led to Southern secession and Civil War.

HIST   348. The American Civil War and Reconstruction. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the major events, forces, personalities and significance of the Civil War and Reconstruction eras.

HIST   349. The Emergence of Modern America, 1877-1914. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An examination of the major political, legal, social and economic trends in the United States at this time, focusing on the industrialization of the nation and the resulting effects it had on such diverse matters as urbanization, immigration, economic distribution and cultural affairs, culminating in the Progressive reform movement.

HIST   350. U.S. History, 1900-1945. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the political, social, economic and cultural history of the United States from 1900 to 1945, with emphasis on how the American people have responded to reform, war, prosperity, depression, international status and changing relationships within government and society.

HIST   351. U.S. History Since 1945. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the political, social, economic and cultural history of the United States in the 20th century, with emphasis on how the American people have responded to reform, war, prosperity, depression, international status and changing relationships within government and society.

HIST   352. History of the South I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A regional history of the Old South from the colonial period to 1861, placing particular emphasis upon the distinctive culture and problems of the South and its significance in the history of the United States.

HIST   353. History of the South II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A regional history of the New South from 1865 to the present, placing particular emphasis upon the distinctive culture and problems of the South and its significance in the history of the United States.

HIST   354. History of Native Americans in the South. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines the history of Native Americans in the American South and how colonial encounters with Europeans impacted life in indigenous towns, villages and farmsteads.

HIST   355. Native Americans in Modern America. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines some of the key historical and cultural issues in American Indian history during the 20th century.

HIST   356. History of Virginia I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Focuses on the central themes, events and personalities of the state’s history from the pre-colonial period to 1865.

HIST   357. History of Virginia II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Focuses on the central themes, events and personalities of the state's history from 1865 to the present.

HIST   358. History of the American Frontier. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A survey of the western movement in the United States from the time the first outposts were established to the end of the frontier in the 19th century. Particular attention to the influence of the frontier upon the American mind and ideals.

HIST   360. The Long Civil Rights Movement. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines race relations and changes to race relations, focusing on African-Americans in the United States' South but including related struggles for civil rights and equality from the late-1800s to the present.

HIST   361. Americans from Africa. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the history and culture of blacks in the United States, designed to analyze some of the most important aspects of black life and the attitudes of the dominant society within which blacks lived. The second semester emphasizes the changing status, expectations and ideologies of black Americans in the 20th century. First semester: to 1877. Second semester: since 1877. Crosslisted as: AFAM   361.

HIST   362. Americans from Africa. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the history and culture of blacks in the United States, designed to analyze some of the most important aspects of black life and the attitudes of the dominant society within which blacks lived. The second semester emphasizes the changing status, expectations and ideologies of black Americans in the 20th century. First semester: to 1877. Second semester: since 1877. Crosslisted as: AFAM   362.

HIST   363. American Religious History I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A survey of religious movements, events and ideas in America from indigenous and colonial traditions to the Civil War, with attention to the diversity of religious expression and the relationship between church and state.

HIST   364. American Religious History II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A survey of religious movements, events and ideas in America from the Civil War to the present, with attention to the diversity of religious expression and the relationship between church and state.

HIST   365. American Women's History I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Students will analyze historical changes in the social, cultural, political and economic position of women in America from the colonial period through the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention. Methods include reading, lecture and discussion. Topics include differences and similarities of women's experiences across lines of class, race and ethnicity, the struggle for suffrage and social reform, shifting gender roles and changing employment opportunities. Crosslisted as: GSWS   341.

HIST   366. American Women's History II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Through reading, lecture and discussion, students will analyze historical changes in the social, cultural, political and economic position of women in America from 1848 to the present. Topics include differences and similarities of women's experiences across lines of class, race and ethnicity; the struggle for suffrage and social reform; shifting gender roles; and changing employment opportunities.

HIST   370. History of Central America. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An exploration of the history of the region beginning with pre-Columbian civilizations and continuing to the present. Topics include the Spanish conquest, the liberal-conservative struggle, U.S. gunboat diplomacy, the Sandinista Revolution, civil wars in El Salvador and Guatemala and current challenges to democracy in the region.

HIST   371. History of Mexico. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A survey of Mexican history, including topics such as the pre-Columbian civilizations, the Spanish conquest and the colonial order, as well as independence, the struggle for reform, revolution and the development of the modern state.

HIST   372. History of Brazil. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A survey of Brazilian history including topics such as the pre-Columbian civilizations, Portuguese colonialism, the independent empire and the republic, and populism and the modern state.

HIST   373. History of the Andes to 1800. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A critical view of the historical process of the Andean region from the pre-Columbian period to independence from Spain. Focuses mainly on the core of the region, which currently comprises the territories of Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru. Special attention to the indigenous population of the Andes -- also known as "Indians," "Andeans" or "Amerindians" -- and their interactions with other ethnic groups (Europeans, Criollos, Mestizos, as well as Africans and their descendants) in the political, economic, social and cultural realms.

HIST   374. History of the Andes From 1800. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A critical view of the historical process of the Andean region from independence from Spain to the present. Focuses mainly on the core of the region, which currently comprises the territories of Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru. Special attention to the indigenous population of the Andes -- also known as "Indians," "Andeans" or "Amerindians" -- and their interactions with other ethnic groups (Europeans, Criollos, Mestizos, as well as Africans and their descendants) in the political, economic, social and cultural realms.

HIST   376. Caribbean History to 1838. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An exploration of changes in the structure of Caribbean society from the late 15th century to 1838, with emphasis on the development of plantation slavery, social stratification, race, slave resistance, the Haitian Revolution, African cultural patterns and abolition. Crosslisted as: AFAM   392.

HIST   377. Caribbean History Since 1838. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Covers major developments in the history of the Caribbean in the period after the British abolition of slavery in 1834, with a major focus on the social and economic aspects of change.

HIST   378. Atlantic Slavery. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines social and economic aspects of slavery in the Atlantic world, principally Africa, the Caribbean, the United States and Canada.

HIST   379. The History of Modern Japan. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course will offer a detailed examination of Japan's modern history, from the rise of Tokugawa rule in 1600 to the end of World War II. A general overview of Japan's traditional society will give way to a historical analysis of the major social, cultural, political and intellectual changes that occurred in Japan throughout this time period.

HIST   380. Africa and the Americas: Slavery, Gender and Race. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines various aspects of slavery in Africa and selected parts of the African diaspora, including the United States, Canada and the Caribbean, with special emphasis on the role played by race and gender. Topics will include African conditions of servility, the trans-Atlantic trade in enslaved Africans, and chattel slavery, demography, labor, law, discipline, abuse, resistance and status. Crosslisted as: AFAM   390/GSWS   390.

HIST   381. History of West Africa to 1800. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the transformation of West African societies from early times to 1800, with emphasis on the rise of states and empires, the introduction, spread and impact of Islam, the Atlantic slave trade and its effects, and colonialism. Crosslisted as: AFAM   387.

HIST   383. History of Southern Africa. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the history and culture of the peoples of southern Africa. Deals with the areas that presently are the Republic of South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, Botswana, Namibia and Zimbabwe. Emphasizes the interaction among the various communities and ethnolinguistic groups in southern Africa. Crosslisted as: AFAM   389.

HIST   384. Africa: Social, Cultural and Economic History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of economic, social and cultural developments in Africa from the beginning of the 19th century to the present, with emphasis on agricultural and industrial development, trade, Africa's involvement in the world economy, changes in labor systems, racial dominance, African initiatives and resistance, religion and social evolution, and Africa in world affairs. Crosslisted as: AFAM   388.

HIST   385. The History of Modern Japan. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course will offer a detailed examination of Japan's modern history, from the rise of Tokugawa rule in 1600 to the end of World War II. A general overview of Japan's traditional society will give way to a historical analysis of the major social, cultural, political and intellectual changes that occurred in Japan throughout this time period.

HIST   386. History of Late Imperial China, 900-1800. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines the history of China from 900 to 1800 CE. A general overview of China's political economy is followed by a historical analysis of the major social, cultural, political, intellectual and economic changes that occurred in China between 900 and 1800 CE. In addition, students will be introduced to such concepts and issues as empire building, conquest dynasties, steppe and sedentary societies, sociocultural history and Western and Chinese historiography.

HIST   387. The History of Modern China, 1800 to the Present. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines China's modern history beginning at the height of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) in 1800. A general overview of China's traditional political economy is followed by a historical analysis of the major social, cultural, political, intellectual and economic changes that occurred in China from 1800 to the present. This course is divided into three sections: the first examines the factors leading to the collapse of China's last dynasty in 1912; the second focuses on the revolutionary changes taking place in China during the first half of the 20th century (from 1912 to 1949); and the final section looks at Communist China since 1949.

HIST   388. Africa: Social, Cultural and Economic History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of economic, social and cultural developments in Africa from the beginning of the 19th century to the present, with emphasis on agricultural and industrial development, trade, Africa's involvement in the world economy, changes in labor systems, racial dominance, African initiatives and resistance, religion and social evolution and Africa in world affairs. Crosslisted as: AFAM   388.

HIST   389. History in Film: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits with different topics. An examination of the uses and misuses of historical events and personalities in film. Lectures and readings are used to critically analyze films dealing with biographies, events and propaganda.

HIST   390. Historical Archaeology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ANTH/INTL   103 or ANTH   105/INTL   104, and any history course. A review of historical archaeology, recognizing its contemporary emphasis on the spread of European cultures across the globe beginning in the 15th century. Methods and findings of archaeological research from the United States, Europe and Africa will be covered with special emphasis on the study of documents and artifacts related to the emergence and present state of the modern world. Students will participate in field research. Crosslisted as: ANTH   394.

HIST   391. Topics in History. 1-3 Hours.

Semester course; 1, 2 or 3 lecture hours. Variable credit. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credits. An in-depth study of a selected topic in history. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester.

HIST   392. Revolutions in Science I. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A survey of the history of science from the ancient Greeks to 1800, focusing on the development of scientific ideas, practices and institutions in Western society. Crosslisted as: SCTS   392.

HIST   393. Revolutions in Science II. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A survey of the history of science from 1800 to the present, focusing on the development of scientific ideas, practices and institutions in Western society. Crosslisted as: SCTS   393.

HIST   394. Historical Archaeology. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ANTH/INTL   103 or ANTH   105/INTL   104, and any history course. A review of historical archaeology, recognizing its contemporary emphasis on the spread of European cultures across the globe beginning in the 15th century. Methods and findings of archaeological research from the United States, Europe and Africa will be covered with special emphasis on the study of documents and artifacts related to the emergence and present state of the modern world. Students will participate in field research. Crosslisted as: ANTH   394.

HIST   397. Genetics and Society: 1865 to the Present. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An investigation of the science and technology of heredity in its historical, cultural and political contexts, emphasizing the ways in which genetic theories have been applied in attempting to solve social and biological problems. Crosslisted as: SCTS   397.

HIST   398. History of Medicine and Public Health: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated with different thematic content for a maximum of six credits. Studies in selected topics in the history of medicine, medical science or public health. Includes introduction to the interdisciplinary approaches practiced in the history of medicine as well as the historical content and relevant analytical skills needed to examine the specific course theme. Crosslisted as: SCTS   398.

HIST   399. Introduction to Science and Technology Studies. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An introduction to the study of science, technology and medicine from political, sociological and historical perspectives, focusing on case studies that illustrate the methods and theories used to examine the structure and behavior of the scientific community and the role of scientific knowledge in shaping public culture. Crosslisted as: GVPA   399/SCTS   300.

HIST   401. Studies in Ancient History: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated once, with a different topic, for credit. Prerequisite: 3 credits of HIST at the 300-level or permission of instructor. Courses taught under this heading provide advanced study and analysis of the theory and field of ancient history.

HIST   402. Studies in Medieval History: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated once, with a different topic, for credit. Prerequisite: 3 credits of HIST at the 300-level or permission of instructor. Courses taught under this heading provide advanced study and analysis of the theory and field of medieval history.

HIST   403. Studies in Early Modern European History: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Repeatable once, with a different topic, for credit. Prerequisite: 3 credits of HIST at the 300-level or permission of instructor. Courses taught under this heading provide advanced study and analysis of the theory and field of early modern European history.

HIST   404. Studies in Modern European History: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Repeatable once, with a different topic, for credit. Prerequisite: 3 credits of HIST at the 300-level or permission of instructor. Courses taught under this heading provide advanced study and analysis of the theory and field of modern European history.

HIST   406. Studies in Middle Eastern History: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated once, with a different topic, for credit. Prerequisite: 3 credits of HIST at the 300-level or permission of instructor. Courses taught under this heading provide advanced study and analysis of the theory and field of Middle Eastern history.

HIST   407. Studies in Early American History: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated once, with a different topic, for credit. Prerequisite: 3 credits of HIST at the 300-level or permission of instructor. Courses taught under this heading provide advanced study and analysis of the theory and field of early American history.

HIST   408. Studies in Modern American History: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated once, with a different topic, for credit. Prerequisite: 3 credits of HIST at the 300-level or permission of instructor. Courses taught under this heading provide advanced study and analysis of the theory and field of modern American history.

HIST   409. Studies in Latin American History: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated once, with a different topic, for credit. Prerequisite: 3 credits of HIST at the 300-level or permission of instructor. Courses taught under this heading provide advanced study and analysis of the theory and field of Latin American history.

HIST   410. Studies in African History: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours, 3 credits. May be repeated once, with a different topic, for credit. Prerequisite: 3 credits of HIST at the 300-level or permission of instructor. Courses taught under this heading provide advanced study and analysis of the theory and field of African history.

HIST   411. Studies in the African Diaspora: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated once, with a different topic, for credit. Prerequisite: 3 credits of HIST at the 300-level or permission of instructor. Courses taught under this heading provide advanced study and analysis of the theory and field of the African diaspora.

HIST   412. Studies in Asian History: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated once, with a different topic, for credit. Prerequisite: 3 credits of HIST at the 300-level or permission of instructor. Courses taught under this heading provide advanced study and analysis of the theory and field of Asian history.

HIST   413. Studies in Atlantic History: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated once, with a different topic, for credit. Prerequisite: 3 credits of HIST at the 300-level or permission of instructor. Courses taught under this heading provide advanced study and analysis of the theory and field of Atlantic history.

HIST   414. Studies in Indigenous History: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated once, with a different topic, for credit. Prerequisite: 3 credits of HIST at the 300-level or permission of instructor. Courses taught under this heading provide advanced study and analysis of the theory and field of indigenous history.

HIST   415. Studies in the History of Religion: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated once, with a different topic, for credit. Prerequisite: 3 credits of HIST at the 300-level or permission of instructor. Courses taught under this heading provide advanced study and analysis of the theory and field of religious history.

HIST   416. Studies in the History of Women, Gender and Sexuality: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: 3 credits of 300-level HIST or permission of instructor. Repeatable once, with a different topic, for credit. Courses taught under this heading provide advanced study and analysis of the theory and field of the history of women, gender and sexuality.

HIST   417. Studies in African American History: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated once, with a different topic, for credit. Prerequisite: 3 credits of HIST at the 300-level or permission of instructor. Courses taught under this heading provide advanced study and analysis of the theory and field of African American history.

HIST   420. Studies in Historical Method: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated once, with a different topic, for credit. Prerequisite: any 300-level HIST course. Focuses on a particular methodology used by historians as they investigate the past.

HIST   421. Studies in Comparative History: ____. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated once, with a different topic, for credit. Prerequisite: any 300-level HIST course. Undertakes a topic that cuts across regions and cultures, making comparative judgments about human events.

HIST   485. Seminar in Historiography. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for maximum of 6 credits with different topics. Introduction to questions in historiography, meaning, methodology and interpretation in the teaching and writing of history.

HIST   490. Seminar in History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. Prerequisite: HIST   300. Research and analysis of a selected historical topic in a seminar setting. See the Schedule of Classes for each semester's offerings.

HIST   492. Independent Study. 2-4 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. 2-4 credits per semester. Maximum total of 6 credits. Open generally to students of only junior and senior standing who have acquired 12 credits in the departmental disciplines. Determination of the amount of credit and permission of instructor and department chair must be procured prior to registration of the course.

HIST   493. Internship. 2-4 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours; 2-4 credits per semester. May be repeated for a maximum total of 6 credits. Prerequisite: HIST   300. Open generally to students of senior standing. Students receive credit for work on historical projects with approved agencies. Determination of the amount of credit and permission of departmental internship coordinator must be procured prior to registration for the course.