The Bachelor of Arts in African American Studies is an interdisciplinary degree that provides students with knowledge of human cultures and intellectual and practical skills to engage complexity, diversity and change. The degree program fosters students’ personal and social responsibility and, through applied learning experiences, empowers students to negotiate and to solve the complex problems of the 21st century. African American studies majors often pursue graduate and professional degree programs in business, education, history, international relations, law, political science, psychology, public health and social work. Career opportunities with a B.A. only in African American Studies include employment in community health agencies, public and private schools and nonprofit organizations.

Learning outcomes

Upon completing this program, students will know and know how to do the following:

  • Define Black experiences across the African Diaspora.
    We aim for each of our majors to demonstrate knowledge of the major concepts, perspectives and theories in Africana studies. This knowledge includes an understanding of the intellectual origins and extant and emergent interdisciplinary scholarship that provide context, definition and form to the collective experiences of persons of African descent.
  • Document and measure Black experiences across the African Diaspora.
    We aim for each of our majors to demonstrate analytical skills that enable them to compare and contrast the utility of qualitative and quantitative approaches in Africana studies and critical-thinking skills that allow them to assess the cultural, political and social implications of such approaches when measuring the experiences of people across Africa and its Diaspora.
  • To interpret Black experiences across the African Diaspora.
    We aim for each of our majors to demonstrate an awareness of the interpretive frameworks that give meaning to Black experiences across the Diaspora. This awareness includes recognition of the intersectionality of artistic, cultural and historical perspectives; gendered, political and religious perspectives; and social and behavioral perspectives.
  • To affirm and validate Black experiences across the African Diaspora.
    We aim for each of our student majors to demonstrate the ability to critically engage and to propose integrity-based solutions to novel problems that impact persons of African descent and their communities
 

Special requirements

Majors in African American studies must meet the general education requirements of the College of Humanities and Sciences. The Bachelor of Arts in African American Studies requires the completion of 120 credits with at least 30 credits in African American Studies courses. At least 15 of the 30 credits in African American Studies must be in upper-level courses.

Students also are required to establish an area of study by taking a minimum of four courses in the artistic, historical and literary perspectives concentration. At least one of the four courses must be an upper-level course.

Degree requirements for African American Studies, Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) with a concentration in artistic, historical and literary perspectives

General education requirements

University Core Education Curriculum (minimum 21 credits)
UNIV 111 Play VideoPlay course video for Focused Inquiry IFocused Inquiry I3
UNIV 112 Play VideoPlay course video for Focused Inquiry IIFocused Inquiry II3
UNIV 200Inquiry and the Craft of Argument3
Approved humanities/fine arts3
Approved natural/physical sciences3-4
Approved quantitative literacy3-4
Approved social/behavioral sciences3-4
Total Hours21-24
Additional College of Humanities and Sciences requirements (11-23 credits)
HUMS 202Choices in a Consumer Society1
Approved H&S diverse and global communities3
Approved H&S human, social and political behavior (fulfills University Core social/behavioral sciences)
Approved H&S literature and civilization (fulfills University Core humanities/fine arts)
Approved H&S science and technology (fulfills University Core natural/physical sciences)
Approved H&S general education electives6-8
Experiential fine arts 11-3
Foreign language through the 102 level (by course or placement)0-8
Total Hours11-23
1

Course offered by the School of the Arts

Major requirements

AFAM 111 Play VideoPlay course video for Introduction to Africana StudiesIntroduction to Africana Studies3
AFAM 211Africana Social and Political Thought3
AFAM 311African Diaspora Experiences3
AFAM 399Interdisciplinary Research Methods 13
AFAM 411Applied Concepts in Africana Studies3
AFAM 499Capstone Seminar in Africana Studies3
Artistic, historical and literary perspectives requirement (Complete a minimum of 12 credits from the approved electives below. At least one course must be 300-level or higher.)12
Total Hours30
1

Any one of GSWS 393, POLI 320, PSYC 317, SOCY 320 or SLWK 380 may be substituted for this course if completed with a minimum grade of C.

Open electives

Open electives32-58

Total minimum requirement 120 credits

Artistic, historical and literary perspectives electives

AFAM/HIST 105Survey of African History3
AFAM/ANTH/INTL 200Introduction to African Societies3
AFAM/MHIS 250Introduction to African-American Music3
AFAM/THEA 303Black Theatre3
AFAM/URSP/INTL 333Geography of Africa3
AFAM/ARTH 342African-American Art3
AFAM/ARTH 358African Art and Architecture3
AFAM/HIST 361Americans from Africa3
AFAM/HIST 362Americans from Africa3
AFAM/ENGL 363/INTL 366African Literature3
AFAM/ENGL 365/INTL 367Caribbean Literature3
AFAM/ENGL 379African-American Literature: Beginnings Through the Harlem Renaissance3
AFAM 387/HIST 381History of West Africa to 18003
AFAM 388/HIST 384Africa: Social, Cultural and Economic History3
AFAM 389/HIST 383History of Southern Africa3
AFAM 390/HIST 380/GSWS 390Africa and the Americas: Slavery, Gender and Race3
AFAM 392/HIST 376Caribbean History to 18383
AFAM 413/ARTH 350African and Oceanic Art3
AFAM/ANTH/INTL 420Women of Africa3
AFAM/ARTH 440Contemporary Art and Architecture of Africa3
AFAM 491Topics in African-American Studies (courses with an artistic, historical or literary focus only)3
APPM 360Jazz Orchestra 11
APPM 361Small Jazz Ensemble 11
ARTH 454Studies in African and Oceanic Art3
DANC 255Hip Hop Dance2
DANC 256Hip Hop Dance2
DANC 291Topics in Dance1-4
DANC 413African American Presence in American Dance, Performance and Social Contexts3
ENGL 355African-American Women Writers3
ENGL 382African-American Literature: Realism to the Present3
FREN 450Francophone Literatures and Cultures1-3
HIST 302Ancient Egypt3
HIST 348The American Civil War and Reconstruction3
HIST 352History of the South I3
HIST 353History of the South II3
HIST 356History of Virginia I3
HIST 357History of Virginia II3
HIST 360The Long Civil Rights Movement3
HIST 377Caribbean History Since 18383
HIST 378Atlantic Slavery3
HIST 410Studies in African History: ____3
HIST 411Studies in the African Diaspora: ____3
HIST 417Studies in African American History: ____3
MHIS 147Jazz Theory and Aural Skills 23
MHIS 291Topics in Music1-3
MHIS 311Jazz Arranging I 23
MHIS 312Jazz Arranging II 23
MHIS 324Jazz History 23

 Some cross listed courses may count toward multiple concentration requirements.

1

 Accessible by audition

2

 Restricted to music majors

What follows is a sample plan that meets the prescribed requirements within a four-year course of study at VCU. Please contact your adviser before beginning course work toward a degree.

Freshman year
Fall semesterHours
AFAM 111 Play VideoPlay course video for Introduction to Africana Studies Introduction to Africana Studies 1 3
UNIV 101 Introduction to the University 1
UNIV 111 Play VideoPlay course video for Focused Inquiry I Focused Inquiry I 3
Approved H&S human, social and political behavior 3-4
Approved quantitative literacy 3-4
 Term Hours: 13-15
Spring semester
HUMS 202 Choices in a Consumer Society 1
UNIV 112 Play VideoPlay course video for Focused Inquiry II Focused Inquiry II 3
Approved H&S general education elective 3-4
Approved H&S literature and civilization 3
Approved H&S science and technology 3-4
 Term Hours: 13-15
Sophomore year
Fall semester
AFAM 211 Africana Social and Political Thought 3
UNIV 200 Inquiry and the Craft of Argument 3
Experiential fine arts 1-3
Foreign language (102-level) 4
Open elective 3
 Term Hours: 14-16
Spring semester
Approved artistic, historical and literary perspectives elective 3
Approved H&S general education elective 3-4
Open electives 9
 Term Hours: 15-16
Junior year
Fall semester
AFAM 311 African Diaspora Experiences 3
Approved artistic, historical and literary perspectives elective 3
Open electives 10-12
 Term Hours: 16-18
Spring semester
AFAM 399 Interdisciplinary Research Methods 2 3
Approved artistic, historical and literary perspectives elective 3
Open electives 10-12
 Term Hours: 16-18
Senior year
Fall semester
AFAM 411 Applied Concepts in Africana Studies 3
Approved artistic, historical and literary perspectives elective 3
Open electives 12
 Term Hours: 18
Spring semester
AFAM 499 Capstone Seminar in Africana Studies 3
Open electives 12
 Term Hours: 15
 Total Hours: 120-131
1

Fulfills H&S diverse and global communities
 

2

Any one of GSWS 393, POLI 320, PSYC 317, SOCY 320 or SLWK 380 may be substituted for this course if completed with a minimum grade of C.

AFAM 104. Sociology of Racism. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The course will explore the direct and indirect ways in which racial attitudes are acquired, their effect on individuals and society, and the institutional and ideological manifestations of racism as a "faith system," as exploitation and as a form of human conflict. The central focus of interest will be on black-white relationships. Crosslisted as: SOCY 104.

AFAM 105. Survey of African History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A survey of African civilizations from prehistory to the present, emphasizing the events, ideas and institutions that have shaped, influenced and defined Africa's place in the world. First semester: to 1800. Second semester: 1800 to the present. Crosslisted as: HIST 105.

AFAM 106. Survey of African History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A survey of African civilizations from prehistory to the present, emphasizing the events, ideas and institutions that have shaped, influenced and defined Africa's place in the world. First semester: to 1800. Second semester: 1800 to the present. Crosslisted as: HIST 106.

AFAM 111. Introduction to Africana Studies. 3 Hours.Play VideoPlay course video for Introduction to Africana Studies

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Using a multidisciplinary approach, this course will familiarize students with important events developments, personalities and other phenomena that help facilitate the study and understanding of peoples of African descent dispersed throughout the world from their early continental African past to their present existence.

AFAM 121. Tap Technique I. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 2 studio hours. 2 credits. Beginning study and training in the principles of tap technique with emphasis upon style, body alignment, spatial patterning, flexibility, strength and kinesthetic awareness to move the body in the style required for tap dancing. Crosslisted as: DANC 121.

AFAM 122. Tap Technique I. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 2 studio hours. 2 credits. Beginning study and training in the principles of tap technique with emphasis upon style, body alignment, spatial patterning, flexibility, strength and kinesthetic awareness to move the body in the style required for tap dancing. Crosslisted as: DANC 122.

AFAM 126. African-Caribbean Dance I. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 2 studio hours. 2 credits. Dance based on the movements and rhythms of Africa and the Caribbean. Crosslisted as: DANC 126.

AFAM 127. African-Caribbean Dance I. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 2 studio hours. 2 credits. Dance based on the movements and rhythms of Africa and the Caribbean. Crosslisted as: DANC 127.

AFAM 151. Jazz Dance Technique I. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 2 studio hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: DANC 102 or permission of instructor. Study and training in the principles and concepts of jazz technique. Emphasis on body alignment, flexibility, balance, rhythmic awareness and mastery of isolated movements of body parts. The course includes the exploration of the relationship between jazz music and jazz dance. Crosslisted as: DANC 151.

AFAM 152. Jazz Dance Technique I. 2 Hours.

Semester course; 1 lecture and 2 studio hours. 2 credits. Prerequisite: DANC 102 or permission of instructor. Study and training in the principles and concepts of jazz technique. Emphasis on body alignment, flexibility, balance, rhythmic awareness and mastery of isolated movements of body parts. The course includes the exploration of the relationship between jazz music and jazz dance. Crosslisted as: DANC 152.

AFAM 200. Introduction to African Societies. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course introduces the student to the African continent, its peoples and cultures. It covers such general characteristics as the physical and geographical features, climate, topography, traditional economies, languages, religions, social systems and other cultural features that are traditional to its people. Crosslisted as: ANTH 200/INTL 200.

AFAM 204. Africa in Transition. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: AFAM/ANTH/INTL 200 or permission of instructor. The impact of modern social change upon the traditional aspects of African life. Various aspects of social change as it applies to Africa today will be explored.

AFAM 206. African American Family Relationships. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Focuses on the African-American family from the 1940s to the present. Examines the values and the interpersonal/role relationships that are involved in forming and maintaining African-American families in the contemporary United States. Topics include dating and sexual relationships, marital relationships, parent-child relationships and relationships with members of the extended family. Crosslisted as: SOCY 206/GSWS 206.

AFAM 211. Africana Social and Political Thought. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Guides students in identifying and mapping the continuities and discontinuities in political and social thought of the African world. Through an exploration of the various works of scholars, activists and artists, this course will expose students to nondominant narratives in an effort to expand the breadth and depth of interdependence in Africana contributions to ideas such as, but not limited to, the arts, justice, equality and human emancipation.

AFAM 250. Introduction to African-American Music. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An introductory survey of black involvement with the development of music in America from 1607 to the present. African-American musical styles will be studied from many aspects, including their African roots and contemporary popular expression. Performance practices will be analyzed and active cognitive listening skills developed through guided listening to selected recordings. Crosslisted as: MHIS 250.

AFAM 302. Politics of the Civil Rights Movement. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. The main objectives of the course are to introduce and examine the personalities and activities of the modern Civil Rights Movement. The course provides the historical background leading up to the peak years of the struggle for racial equality in America. It has special focus on the events of the 1960s and particularly their implication for the current state of U.S. Civil Rights. Crosslisted as: POLI 302.

AFAM 303. Black Theatre. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the major developments in the evolution of black theatre through readings and studio performances in black-related and black theatre dramaturgy. Crosslisted as: THEA 303.

AFAM 305. African American Family in Social Context. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: SOCY 101. A socio-historical examination of the development of the family system of Americans from Africa. Focuses on large-scale (macro level) processes such as changes in the major mode of economic production and in political systems and the corresponding changes in black family structure and functioning. Presents the theoretical material on African-American families and social change that prepares students for further study of the family as a social institution and for the study of family policy. This course is designed to meet the needs of upper-division social science majors. Crosslisted as: GSWS 305/SOCY 305.

AFAM 307. Black Religion. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An analysis of the role of religion in the lives of blacks with an emphasis on African religions and philosophies, the black church in America, and the roles of the various faiths, sects and cults. Crosslisted as: RELS 307/INTL 307.

AFAM 309. Global Women's Health. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Explores issues in women's health from a national and international perspective with an emphasis on the experiences of women in the African diaspora. Theories in medical anthropology are employed to examine key themes. Crosslisted as: ANTH 309/INTL 309/GSWS 309.

AFAM 310. African American Health: Health Disparities. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines health and health disparities among African-Americans in the U.S. Explores the primary health concerns and issues in the African-American community. Topics include impacts of infant mortality, cardiovascular disease, AIDS, violence and cancer on the overall health status of African-Americans.

AFAM 311. African Diaspora Experiences. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Traces the geography and history of dispersed African peoples from their motherland to all parts of the world and reveals the cultural, social, political and economic developments of peoples of African descent worldwide. Surveys the evolution and implication of the trans-Atlantic, trans-Saharan, and trans-Indian Ocean slave trade, in particular the dimensions of experiences of African-descended peoples with emphasis not only on North and South America but also the Caribbean, Europe, Asia, Papua New Guinea and Australia.

AFAM 315. Economic Development. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ECON 203 with a minimum grade of B and ECON 211; or ECON 210 and ECON 211. An introduction to the process of economic development. Surveys development theory and experiences of underdeveloped countries of Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean and of developed countries. Explores obstacles to development and policies and tools for stimulating economic development. Crosslisted as: ECON 315/INTL 315.

AFAM 318. Politics of Race, Class and Gender. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the racial, class and gender influences on the history and development of political values, conflicts, processes, structures and public policy in the United States. Crosslisted as: POLI 318/GSWS 318.

AFAM 322. Personality and Behavior of the African American. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. A study of personality factors such as motivation, ego-functioning and the socialization processes, with special emphasis on living conditions of African-Americans. Crosslisted as: PSYC 322.

AFAM 333. Geography of Africa. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the land forms, climate, peoples, livelihoods, settlement patterns and cultural groupings of sub-Saharan Africa. Crosslisted as: URSP 333/INTL 333.

AFAM 342. African-American Art. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ARTH 104 and UNIV 200 or HONR 200, both with a minimum grade of C. A study of the art forms produced by Americans of African origin from the 17th century to the present with an emphasis on contemporary trends in black art. Crosslisted as: ARTH 342.

AFAM 343. Black Political Thought. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An historical and sociological perspective on the political and social ideas of black thinkers from David Walker to the present. Crosslisted as: POLI 343.

AFAM 345. African-American Politics. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. In this course, students will discuss and analyze the dynamics of the black experience in the American political system. The status of African-Americans in the United States and the struggle for racial equality will be examined, as will the manner in which American institutions have responded to these phenomena. Students will examine the race/class metric in African-American politics, particularly policies of Affirmative Action as a black progress strategy. Crosslisted as: POLI 345.

AFAM 346. Mental Health Across the African Diaspora. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Surveys theory and research on the interaction of culture and mental illness focusing primarily on populations of African descent in a seminar format. Topics to be addressed, through the lens of the Africana world, include epidemiological and ethnographic research on major psychiatric disorders, culture-bound syndromes and idioms of distress, mental health of immigrants and refugees, and cross-cultural competence in clinical practice.

AFAM 347. African American Children and Families. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Reviews cultural variations in the physical, cognitive, emotional and social development of African American children. Addresses historical and contemporary frameworks of child development and highlights the strengths and limitations of extant research paradigms in the study of African American children. Considers integrity-based approaches that explain the developmental competencies of African American children in response to environmental risks that exceed normative expectations.

AFAM 350. Studies in the Music of the African Continent and Diaspora. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite: MHIS 243 or MHIS/AFAM 250. An in-depth examination of selected topics and issues in African-derived musical and cultural traditions. See the Schedule of Classes for specific topics to be offered each semester. Crosslisted as: MHIS 350/INTL 370.

AFAM 356. Government and Politics of Africa. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. This course will introduce students to the basic outlines of government and politics in Africa. The course will consider such topics as colonialism, elitism, and nationalism and modernization strategies. Using the comparative approach, the course will primarily focus on West, East and Central Africa. Crosslisted as: POLI 356/INTL 356.

AFAM 357. Politics of Southern Africa. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An examination of racial and political developments in the southern tip of Africa. While South Africa will be the primary focus of analysis, other countries in the region such as Zimbabwe, Angola and Mozambique will be studied. Crosslisted as: POLI 357/INTL 357.

AFAM 358. African Art and Architecture. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: UNIV 200 or HONR 200. A study of African art and architecture from prehistoric times to the present. Special emphasis is placed on form, content, function and meaning, as well as the impact of African art on modern and African-American art. Crosslisted as: ARTH 358.

AFAM 361. Americans from Africa. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the history and culture of blacks in the United States, designed to analyze some of the most important aspects of black life and the attitudes of the dominant society within which blacks lived. The second semester emphasizes the changing status, expectations and ideologies of black Americans in the 20th century. First semester: to 1877. Second semester: since 1877. Crosslisted as: HIST 361.

AFAM 362. Americans from Africa. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the history and culture of blacks in the United States, designed to analyze some of the most important aspects of black life and the attitudes of the dominant society within which blacks lived. The second semester emphasizes the changing status, expectations and ideologies of black Americans in the 20th century. First semester: to 1877. Second semester: since 1877. Crosslisted as: HIST 362.

AFAM 363. African Literature. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 211, 215, 236, 291, or 295. A survey of the literature of Africa with particular emphases on fiction and on West Africa. Some attention also will be given to orature. Crosslisted as: ENGL 363/INTL 366.

AFAM 365. Caribbean Literature. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 211, 215, 236, 291, or 295. A survey of West Indian writings. Attention will be given to African, European and Amerindian influences, as well as to the emergence of a West Indian literary tradition. Crosslisted as: ENGL 365/INTL 367.

AFAM 379. African-American Literature: Beginnings Through the Harlem Renaissance. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 211, 215, 236, 291 or 295. An examination of the culture and literature of African Americans from their roots in Africa and the African Diaspora to the Harlem Renaissance. Authors may include Wheatley, Douglass, DuBois, Hurston, Hughes and Cullen. Crosslisted as: ENGL 379.

AFAM 387. History of West Africa to 1800. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the transformation of West African societies from early times to 1800, with emphasis on the rise of states and empires, the introduction, spread and impact of Islam, the Atlantic slave trade and its effects, and colonialism. Crosslisted as: HIST 381.

AFAM 388. Africa: Social, Cultural and Economic History. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of economic, social and cultural developments in Africa from the beginning of the 19th century to the present, with emphasis on agricultural and industrial development, trade, Africa's involvement in the world economy, changes in labor systems, racial dominance, African initiatives and resistance, religion and social evolution, and Africa in world affairs. Crosslisted as: HIST 384.

AFAM 389. History of Southern Africa. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A study of the history and culture of the peoples of southern Africa. Deals with the areas that presently are the Republic of South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, Botswana, Namibia and Zimbabwe. Emphasizes the interaction among the various communities and ethnolinguistic groups in southern Africa. Crosslisted as: HIST 383.

AFAM 390. Africa and the Americas: Slavery, Gender and Race. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Examines various aspects of slavery in Africa and selected parts of the African diaspora, including the United States, Canada and the Caribbean, with special emphasis on the role played by race and gender. Topics will include African conditions of servility, the trans-Atlantic trade in enslaved Africans, and chattel slavery, demography, labor, law, discipline, abuse, resistance and status. Crosslisted as: HIST 380/GSWS 390.

AFAM 392. Caribbean History to 1838. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. An exploration of changes in the structure of Caribbean society from the late 15th century to 1838, with emphasis on the development of plantation slavery, social stratification, race, slave resistance, the Haitian Revolution, African cultural patterns and abolition. Crosslisted as: HIST 376.

AFAM 393. Akhenaten to Cleopatra. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. A survey of Egyptian history from the period of the Empire (New Kingdom, c. 1570 B.C.) through the Ptolemaic Age of Cleopatra (c. 30 B.C.). Particular areas of concentration will include the Amarna Period of Akhenaten and various aspects of Egyptian daily life.

AFAM 394. Service-learning in African American Health. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: AFAM 310. Open to African-American studies majors only. Provides an overview of critical public health issues and intervention strategies that may influence life chances and disease susceptibility among African-Americans through a service-learning format.

AFAM 399. Interdisciplinary Research Methods. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Introduces students to the interdisciplinary processes whereby those working in the field develop their arguments and interpretations concerning the black experience. Students will develop increased skills in library research and an awareness of the importance of such methodologies as archaeology, oral history, case studies, participant observations, experiments and surveys. Students will be introduced to the need for critical analysis, the role of biases and frames of references and the reason why scholars working in the field often reach different conclusions with reference to issues of fact, interpretation and significance.

AFAM 401. African-Americans and the U.S. Health Care System. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: AFAM 103, AFAM/SOCY/WMNS/GSWS 305 or permission of the instructor. Explores issues surrounding the disparity in health status and health outcomes between African-Americans and other groups in the United States. Students are required to participate in an experiential exercise designed to enhance learning. Crosslisted as: SOCY 401.

AFAM 411. Applied Concepts in Africana Studies. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: AFAM 111 with a minimum grade of C. Pre- or corequisite: AFAM 399. Explores the processes and challenges involved in studying the experiences of African-descended peoples, with a focus on the development of an idea or observation into a finished and well-executed research product. Investigates how these processes unfold in the works of specific black studies researchers, as they capture the varied consciousnesses, histories and social forces surrounding black life in America, Africa and throughout the diaspora.

AFAM 413. African and Oceanic Art. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: UNIV 200 or HONR 200 with a minimum grade of C. A study of the architecture, painting, sculpture and civilizations of the major art-producing tribes of West Africa and Oceania from the 13th century to the present. Crosslisted as: ARTH 350.

AFAM 416. The Origin and Evolution of the Idea of Race. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ANTH/INTL 103 or AFAM 103 or permission of instructor. This course is an exploration of the origins and social history of the "idea" of race from the Middle Ages to the end of the 20th century. Using both historical and anthropological scholarship, the course presents an analytical framework for race as a sociocultural phenomenon. Crosslisted as: ANTH 416.

AFAM 420. Women of Africa. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ANTH/INTL 103 or AFAM 103. This course looks at the traditional roles of women in African societies and examines how women have coped in different environments. It focuses on the institutionalized aspects of similarities and differences in women's lives in pastoral and horticultural societies and those with mixed economies, and will contrast these with women's roles in large state societies of Africa and in the modern urbanized context. Crosslisted as: ANTH 420/INTL 420.

AFAM 440. Contemporary Art and Architecture of Africa. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisite: ARTH 390 with a minimum grade of C. A study of the impact on African art and architecture of Colonialism, urbanization and modernization. Special emphasis is placed on the search for a new identity by contemporary African artists. Crosslisted as: ARTH 440.

AFAM 451. Religion, Racism and Social Justice. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: RELS 340/INTL 341, WLRD 210 or WRLD 220; UNIV 200 or HONR 200. Explores the complex history and contemporary relationships between religion, racism and social justice. Crosslisted as: INTL 451/RELS 451.

AFAM 491. Topics in African-American Studies. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. May be repeated with different topics for a maximum of 9 credits; 3 credits may be applied to the African-American studies minor. An in-depth study of specialized areas of African-American studies.

AFAM 492. Independent Study. 1-4 Hours.

Semester course; variable hours. Variable credit. Maximum 4 credits per semester. Maximum total of 4 credits in all independent study courses. Prerequisites: completion of 12 credits in African-American studies courses; junior or senior standing.

AFAM 493. Internship in Africana Studies. 1,3 Hour.

Semester course; variable hours. 1, 2 or 3 credits. May be repeated for a maximum total of 6 credits. A minimum of 50 hours of work per credit. Permission from the department chair or internship coordinator required. Determination of the amount of credit (based on hours or effort required) and permission of departmental internship coordinator must be obtained prior to registration for the course. Internship credit is restricted to students with a minimum grade point average of 2.5 and junior or senior status. Through a directed internship with a nonprofit organization, business, industry, government or university, the student will serve as an intern in a position that provides a real-life experience working with a population of African descent with the goal of defining, improving, affirming and/or validating black experiences in the African diaspora. Graded pass/fail.

AFAM 494. Internship in African American Health. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 150 clock hours in appropriate organization. 3 credits. Prerequisites: AFAM 310, either AFAM/ANTH/INTL/WMNS/GSWS 309 or AFAM/PSYC 322, and AFAM 394. Applicants must be approved by the internship coordinator. Open to African-American studies majors of senior standing only. Students are placed in organizations that offer supervised work or research experience in a health setting appropriate to their interests. A final report must be submitted upon completion of the internship.

AFAM 499. Capstone Seminar in Africana Studies. 3 Hours.

Semester course; 3 lecture hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: AFAM 111, AFAM 211, AFAM 311, AFAM 399 and AFAM 411; and senior standing. Involves the planning and execution of a major research project demonstrating the interdisciplinary processes through which those working in the field of Africana studies use diverse sources to develop their arguments and interpretations.